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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have been looking into a new bike and I wanted to get a few opinions to help make my final decision. I want the new Trek Equinox 7 in the place of a road bike, but in use as a road bike. I am concerned slighty about areodynamics and efficiency and comfort for long ride but i really like the over all design of the Trek Equinox 7, unfortunately this is a tri bike. So my question is should i get the Equinox or stick to a road bike for my commute/recreation bike? :confused: :confused:
 

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If you are buying a new bike for commuting/recreation IMHO there is absolutely no reason to opt for a TT bike just because it looks cool. Do you plan on competing in a triathlon or any sort of TT competitive riding ever? TT bikes are built to go in a straight line and not to deal with the type of riding conducive to recreational riding, much less commuting. There are plenty of appealing road bike designs...get a road bike.
 

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the Tri bike is designed to be ridden with on the rivet power on the pedals - ie not comfortable
its basically a time trial bike. -stick to road bike if your not racing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I appreciate the suggestions.. I am thinking about doing duathlons. In this case i would need a TT/Tri bike correct?? I complete understand that the TT/Tri bike is not for comfort.
If i commute on the bike/recreation i will definitly get a good road bike.
 

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If you want a road bike with aerodynamics in mind you might check out the Felt AR series. They use the same aero designs as their TT bikes, but with road bike geometry.

Bob
 

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figstr said:
I appreciate the suggestions.. I am thinking about doing duathlons. In this case i would need a TT/Tri bike correct?? I complete understand that the TT/Tri bike is not for comfort.
If i commute on the bike/recreation i will definitly get a good road bike.
Depends on what you're tri/duo goals are.

If you plan on doing a tri/duo to win, then yes a dedicated tri bike is a good idea.

But, if you plan on doing a tri/duo as a personal challenge event and not as a race, then a road bike is more than fine if not better. Several of my cyclist and non cyclist friends have at one point decided to take on the challenge of accomplish a tri event just to see if they can train well enough to complete event. They do two of three races, then it's over and they are regular road cyclist again.

For the ones that got hooked to tri after trying it on their road bike, they got an separate race day tri bike. Train on the road bike the majority of the time.
 

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holy cromoly said:
Depends on what you're tri/duo goals are.

If you plan on doing a tri/duo to win, then yes a dedicated tri bike is a good idea.

But, if you plan on doing a tri/duo as a personal challenge event and not as a race, then a road bike is more than fine if not better. Several of my cyclist and non cyclist friends have at one point decided to take on the challenge of accomplish a tri event just to see if they can train well enough to complete event. They do two of three races, then it's over and they are regular road cyclist again.
+1....most of the Tri and Duo events around here, you see very few Tri bikes...
 

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Honestly, look at the Cervelo S1 or S2 depending on how much you want to spend. Both terrific road bikes but can also be used just as easily in a Tri.
 

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I would look at getting a road bike and a set of clip on aero bars for racing. A long time ago I was considering a triathlon bike, but it just didn't make sense in the long run. Unless training for that sort of race is the only thing you will do, go for a road bike with clip on aeros.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
New_World_Man said:
I would look at getting a road bike and a set of clip on aero bars for racing. A long time ago I was considering a triathlon bike, but it just didn't make sense in the long run. Unless training for that sort of race is the only thing you will do, go for a road bike with clip on aeros.
Yeah, I have definitely considered getting a road bike w/ aero bars, and for long run thats probly the route i should take. The thought is that i need the fastest bike possible if i am going to win. So i would guess that it would be a tri bike. But for the versitiliy of a road bike w/aero bars,it does sound good!

Anyone else have any thoughts??
 

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figstr said:
Yeah, I have definitely considered getting a road bike w/ aero bars, and for long run thats probly the route i should take. The thought is that i need the fastest bike possible if i am going to win. So i would guess that it would be a tri bike. But for the versitiliy of a road bike w/aero bars,it does sound good!

Anyone else have any thoughts??
No matter how "fast" of a bike you have, there will always those with even "faster" bikes.

All tri bikes accomplish three main points
1. Tucked aero bar handlebar placement and body position
2. Power forward saddle position over the cranks
3. Some form of claimed aerodynamic efficiency

So long as you have the first two points, you're in. The aero bars will keep you in wind cheating position. The saddle placement ensures power delivery in the tucked position. A modified road bike can accomplish this with clip on bars and a forward position seatpost.

The rest of the bikes differ in what they claim their aero designs can achieve for you. Where this is worth it depends on you and the competition in your area.

If this was me, I would just make sure I have bike with points 1 & 2, and focus the rest on training (my swimming sucks) and conditioning to be fast on the bike. Better shape can trump the average shape rider who has a "faster" bike is my philosophy.

But pride and enthusiam for a bike can play in helping you get serious for you tri training too. That is a personal and subjective value that only you can judge for yourself. If having that gorgeous S-Works time trial bike motivates you, the go for it.

But what I am trying to say is that the tri scene seems to be very into the lastest and greatest. Being a cyclist for over 15 years now, I would say the latest and greatest is not necessary, but skill and conditioning is.
 

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wsrobert said:
Honestly, look at the Cervelo S1 or S2 depending on how much you want to spend. Both terrific road bikes but can also be used just as easily in a Tri.
+1 on Cervelo.

Felt also makes a road bike that some of the aero designs of their dedicated tri bike.
 

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I have a friend who bought a Quintana Roo because he liked the looks. He spends most of his time on his ragged old Schwinn road bike. The Roo gets ridden very little. He now knows he made a mistake.
 

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The only thing the TT bike will get you is a couple of seconds. Reasons not to get a TT bike...
Everyone will expect you to go fast on it, you can't have an easy training ride on it.
People in the group rides will shun you and tell you not to ride with them
Duathlons do not require TT bikes
A TT bike is a great second bike to use when needed
.
 
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