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Big is relative
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11,901 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had the following experience on my commute home today;
Riding on the MUT, I saw a guy ahead of me walking next to his bike. He was wearing cycling cleats and was pushing an aluminum Trek road bike with a flat rear tire. I slowed down and ask him if he needed help. He said that he had a flat so I offered him the use of my minipump that I carry in my bag and my patch kit. He didn't have a saddle bag and was carrying nothing as far as spare tubes or pump. He said that he didn't know how to change a tire and would just walk home. What to do? I could fix it for him, I carry two spare tubes, but they are 28-38mm and don't fit a 23mm tire very well so I would have to patch his tube. The only CO2 cartridges I have in my commuter bag are 16 gram and might blow a 23 off of the rim and I sure as hell don't want to pump another rider's tire for them with my crappy minipump. He did have a cell phone. In my mind, a cyclist has a responsibility to be prepared for minor repairs on the road. I just told the guy to have a nice weekend and rode off. Not feeling much guilt here.
 

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Premium Member
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15,996 Posts
Of course you have no responsibility but to PITY DA FOOL!

Seriously, to leave home without a spare is negligent, though I'm sure most of us have done it at one point or another. To not know how to change a flat is just pathetic. It should be mandatory for any cyclist, especially ones who have gone to the trouble of purchasing shoes that are unsuitable to walk in.
 

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"Cypress Gardens" Fl.
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686 Posts
O.K...... You offered the guy use of your pump and patch kit, so as far as I'm concerned you did good. For you to even stop you done good. The Co2 cartridge is your call, because his use of it would cut your options for yourself if you had a flat further down the road. Plus he had a cell phone. It does strike me funny that the guy did'nt even know how to fix a flat, yet he was wearing cycling shoes. Even if he did have a pump and patch kit, he would still be unable to help himself, so why should it be your responsibility. Hell, when I was ten years old I was regularly fixing flats on my buzz bike.

Since you have aligned yourself to be in judgement of your peers on this forum, I rule that you be exonnerated of any guilt, and that your record be fully restored. :D :D
 

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Palm trees & sunshine!
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24,208 Posts
bigbill said:
I had the following experience on my commute home today;
Riding on the MUT, I saw a guy ahead of me walking next to his bike. He was wearing cycling cleats and was pushing an aluminum Trek road bike with a flat rear tire. I slowed down and ask him if he needed help. He said that he had a flat so I offered him the use of my minipump that I carry in my bag and my patch kit. He didn't have a saddle bag and was carrying nothing as far as spare tubes or pump. He said that he didn't know how to change a tire and would just walk home. What to do? I could fix it for him, I carry two spare tubes, but they are 28-38mm and don't fit a 23mm tire very well so I would have to patch his tube. The only CO2 cartridges I have in my commuter bag are 16 gram and might blow a 23 off of the rim and I sure as hell don't want to pump another rider's tire for them with my crappy minipump. He did have a cell phone. In my mind, a cyclist has a responsibility to be prepared for minor repairs on the road. I just told the guy to have a nice weekend and rode off. Not feeling much guilt here.

I woulda changed it.... if he were a she and she was hot.
 

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C 1/5
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613 Posts
I think you fulfilled your fellow cyclist "obligation". You are not required to give up your last tube, CO2, or patch to bail out another cyclist. If you choose too, you should be elevated to "saint" status. :aureola: Nor are you required to conduct maint. classes on the side of the road. Again if you choose to, "saint" status is assured.:smilewinkgrin:
 

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Does it matter?
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760 Posts
You did enough, on your end by asking.

I've helped a triathlon chick patch her tube with my patch kit. She was on the side of a MUT, and told me it was her second flat of the day. I think she didn't check her tire, and the small piece of glass was still in the tire. She was using 650 tires, so I had to patch it since I have 700. As someone else aluded to, she was cute, but I would've helped anyway, even if she wasn't, since I had stopped. Another time I was going along the highway, and some roadie dude was on the side, with his second flat of the day, but he told me it was a blow out. I just tossed him one of my spare tubes (I carry two, usually they're patched tubes, and I don't carry a patch kit anymore), and went on my way. figured he'd already changed one, so he knew how. I've also helped some guy change his tube at night, by shining my headlamp in the area, and offering use of my frame pump.

I think I've built up some good roadie karma over the years with other helpings as well.
 
G

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you know the funny thing is the only times ive flatted i get passsed by all the roadies going by. The only people who seem to try to stop and help are the motorcyclists. Though i am perfectly capable of changing a flat on my own anyway. Just thought that was kinda odd.
 

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Super Moderator
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19,599 Posts
bigbill said:
In my mind, a cyclist has a responsibility to be prepared for minor repairs on the road. I just told the guy to have a nice weekend and rode off. Not feeling much guilt here.
The big ring vortex of evil stikes! :D

Yeah you did good. Not much more you coulda done for him.
 

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Banned forever.....or not
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24,573 Posts
You were too kind. When he said " that he didn't know how to change a tire and would just walk home.", I might have said "You just might want to learn how to repair flats before you venture out on the road again"......."Have a nice walk".
On the other hand, if it was a nice looking lady, I would have fixed the flat with one of my tubes.
Ps A 28-38 tube will work. You just have to be very very careful that you don't pinch the tube when you inflate.
 

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pass the hot sauce
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197 Posts
bigbill said:
...The only CO2 cartridges I have in my commuter bag are 16 gram and might blow a 23 off of the rim...
The only way a 16g cartridge is going to blow a 27" tire off it's wheel is if it is not installed correctly and properly seated on the bead. I use that size cartridge exclusively with 700x22 and 700x23 tires. I'm lucky to get 115 to 120 psi out of one. A 12g cartridge will only take a tire like that up to 85 or 90 psi. If I ride like that, I will soon have another flat!
 

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A Canadian in Sweden
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6,136 Posts
You did good Bill. What else could you do without actually changing the guys flat? Talk about irresponsible and unprepared to not have anything but a phone. No, you do not need to feel guilty.
Cheers, Wayne
 

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Call me a Fred
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17,025 Posts
Sounds like the guy was prepared. He was prepared to walk home. That was his decision. He would have been smarter to have some walking shoes stashed on his route!
 

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Back from the dead
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20,800 Posts
I would feel no guilt. I'm sure the guy learned a pretty good lesson, and maybe it will stick.

I work right off an MUT, and a few weeks ago I was putting my stuff back in my car after an MTB ride. I saw a guy walking his bike across the parking lot who clearly had a flat. I yelled over and asked if he needed a pump. He turned and looked at me quizzically and kept walking. I yelled over again, louder, but he ignored me completely. Oh well. I tried to help. Hell, I would have given him a tube if he needed it. I guess you can add this as one more reason why wearing headphones is stupid when riding! It might save you from walking home.
 

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Registered
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738 Posts
I stopped to help a guy one time who said he had changed his tube but his *explative* pump didn't work worth a *explative*. I offered my CO2 and he said he heard that you'l blow the tire off the rim with those things...I offered to air him up and in an aggravated tone he said "naaa, don't worry about it". I continued on my way, let the jerk take a walk!
 

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The Right Wing
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871 Posts
OK, you did a good deed. Now let's talk inflation tech. You carry both CO2 and a mini (presumably to back up the CO2). If you knew (as I do) that the cool euro thing to do when training is to carry a full size frame pump, would that change your re-inflation plan?
 

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Big is relative
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11,901 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
53T said:
OK, you did a good deed. Now let's talk inflation tech. You carry both CO2 and a mini (presumably to back up the CO2). If you knew (as I do) that the cool euro thing to do when training is to carry a full size frame pump, would that change your re-inflation plan?
I was riding my commuter when I stopped. I carry an amazing amount of crap in my rack bag including CO2 and a minipump. MY bike has fenders, lights that use a bottle battery pack, and a bell. A full size frame would not be out of place on my frame, but since I have to ride through bad areas to and from work, CO2 is my plan to inflate. A 16g CO2 gets my 28mm tire to around 80 pounds, so I use my minipump to top it off when I get to work. 80 pounds is completely rideable. My main flat deterrence is the 28mm armadillo tires with 28-38mm tubes. I have ridden a flat for over a mile to get to a safe place to change.

When I am on training rides, I usually carry two tubes and three CO2 cylinders. I have a trigger type inflator for my CO2 and use 16s for a regular tube and a 12g for a patched tube. I got to try this out two weeks ago when I had three flats and had to patch a tube. Never had much luck with 16g and a freshly patched tube. At that point, I just want to get home.
 
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