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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have the rol volant r/t set. does anybody know the tension of these and if not could you post what tension your ROL wheels have. I have a park ts-2.2 truing stand and a tm-1 tensiometer so i am fully capable of doing my own wheel maintenance. if i called ROL would they still insist i have the tension sent to a local bike shop? i don't like being treated like a child, and might have to look else where for wheels in the future. i love these wheels, but come on already, i want to take care of my wheels and make them last. i would like to keep them speced to the recommended tension.
 

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Diesel Engine
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If ROL's are like most other wheels, that tension value should apply to the front and drive side spokes. The rim is typically the limiting factor of how tight the spokes can be in most wheels.

If you get the drive side right and the wheel is radially/laterally true then there is no absolute "right" value for the non-drive side, but you can check with the tensionometer to verify that the non-drive side spokes have consistent tension.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
true dat

i always run into that. rear wheels anymore with 10cogs seem to require a ton of tension on the drive side just so one can get adequate tension on the non drive side. that is if you try to actually true and center the rear wheel. anybody else run into this?
 

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JohnnyKat said:
i always run into that. rear wheels anymore with 10cogs seem to require a ton of tension on the drive side just so one can get adequate tension on the non drive side. that is if you try to actually true and center the rear wheel. anybody else run into this?
Whatever the dish in the wheel, you want your drive side to be the max that the rim can sustain and let the non-drive side be whatever but consistent throughout. There is no "adequate" tension on the NDS.

BTW, 8-9-10 speeds all have the same freehub width...
 

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Diesel Engine
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Typically if the NDS side spokes are "too loose" it is because there is not enough tension on the DS spokes. The higher the tension on the DS (within what the rim can handle), the higher the NDS can be tensioned to keep the wheel dish and trueness correct.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
8,9, & 10 are the same size aren't they. i forgot they just keep making the chain smaller to accomodate.

curious. i heard that the non-drive side is typically 60% of the drive side. i run into that and my god does the non-drive side seem loose. i tend to push the limit on the drive side tension to avoid wheel flex. brake pads rubbing does not give me a feeling of confidence in corners. however, stressing the rim which i tend to do might get costly. perhaps that's why low spoke count rear wheels are rubbish in practicallity. the flex is too much and no amount of tension can overcome it. i like 24-28 spoke (2x) rear wheels. anything less just doesn't work imho.
 

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JohnnyKat said:
i tend to push the limit on the drive side tension to avoid wheel flex
Not to disappoint or start a discussion on this topic (See MTBR's forum for those) but experiments show that there is no correlation between tension & flex as long as tension is not excessively low. So between 70kgf and 130kgf, there won't be any noticable flex difference.

To be honest, I have a hard time believing it but I saw the data so how can I argue?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
great news

ok just good news. rol sent me the tension requirements and i was right on the money. that is so cool to be able to simply true a wheel and it is just what they recommended. the wheels came almost perfect, and i made them ridiculously true and tensioned to perfecto.

another cool thing is that every spoke has nearly the same tension; of course not between drive and nds. i am super impressed with rol wheels.
 
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