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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to find a better workout for the winter. I am considering rollers (which I have never tried) or just buying a good spin bike for home. I am in the $600-$800 range that I will spend. I am just looking for a way to get an hour or so ride in 3-5 days a week to keep in decent shape and riding form.

Any ideas from experienced riders as to which direction is better in terms of work out and value? I will just be watching tv while I do it and trying to burn winter calories.
 

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spx5002k said:
I need to find a better workout for the winter. I am considering rollers (which I have never tried) or just buying a good spin bike for home. I am in the $600-$800 range that I will spend. I am just looking for a way to get an hour or so ride in 3-5 days a week to keep in decent shape and riding form.

Any ideas from experienced riders as to which direction is better in terms of work out and value? I will just be watching tv while I do it and trying to burn winter calories.
Any particular reason you aren't looking into a stationary trainer for your current bike? Though there are models that are up in your budget, they can be had for much less. As a bonus they don't become clothes racks in the spring/summer/fall months since you can easily store them in your garage, etc.
 

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corning my own beef
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rollers with resistance unit (built in or external, depending on mfg).

the more time you spend indoor training, the more you'll realize it was a good decision.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
regarding a stationary trainer: I tried one a while back and was not pleased with the feel. I want to be able to get decent tension adjustments on the fly so I can stand up. Heard of problems with oil leaks. Maybe I need to revisit. I always thought they were a cheaper alternative. Any ideas?
 

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What type of workout are you going to do on them? Just sitting there spinning your legs mindlessly while you watch tv or something more structured liked intervals?
 

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spx5002k said:
regarding a stationary trainer: I tried one a while back and was not pleased with the feel. I want to be able to get decent tension adjustments on the fly so I can stand up. Heard of problems with oil leaks. Maybe I need to revisit. I always thought they were a cheaper alternative. Any ideas?
Same here. Went with Kreitler rollers and am much happier; meaning the thing actually gets used.
 

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I have a pair of E-Motions and they have barely gotten used. Not because they aren't a good product, but because I have chickened out alot, because they are scary to ride. I've found a rear-mounted trainer to be a much easier tool, especially with limited time in my day to train. My goal for this winter is to make myself ride the E-Motions. I can't even imagine riding real rollers without the "training wheels" the E-Motion provides. There is a definite learning curve to rollers in my experience. Kinda hard to be bored if you are doing everything you can to stay upright. Not sure I'd recommend rollers for zoning out and watching a football game though. You might find yourself dusting yourself off like the quarterback after a blitz. Then again I am the wimp who is avoiding using his $700 wall art for its intended purpose.
 

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krisdrum said:
I have a pair of E-Motions and they have barely gotten used. Not because they aren't a good product, but because I have chickened out alot, because they are scary to ride.
This story is a good reason to try out some rollers before buying. Some people catch on quick, others don't. My shop lent me a set beforehand. See if yours or friends will do the same.
I thought the bumpers on the e-motions were supposed to prevent riding off?
 

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The Weasel said:
This story is a good reason to try out some rollers before buying. Some people catch on quick, others don't. My shop lent me a set beforehand. See if yours or friends will do the same.
I thought the bumpers on the e-motions were supposed to prevent riding off?
Correct, you can't ride off, but since I equate the sensation to riding on ice, you can easily go down side to side.
 

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I have a trainer (Tacx Flo abdout $500-600) which I have used for three years to build strength. I hook my aluminum bike up to it and crank. I will never use my CF bike on a fixed trainer.

Recently I bought some Tacx rollers ($200) for a little variation, which I like. I can also ride my nice bike on rollers without fearing any delamination issues casued by stress.

Knowing what I know, If I could go back, I'd probably look into buying the E-Motion Rollers which I have read is the best of both worlds (trainer/rollers).
 

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krisdrum said:
I have a pair of E-Motions and they have barely gotten used. Not because they aren't a good product, but because I have chickened out alot, because they are scary to ride. I've found a rear-mounted trainer to be a much easier tool, especially with limited time in my day to train. My goal for this winter is to make myself ride the E-Motions. I can't even imagine riding real rollers without the "training wheels" the E-Motion provides. There is a definite learning curve to rollers in my experience. Kinda hard to be bored if you are doing everything you can to stay upright. Not sure I'd recommend rollers for zoning out and watching a football game though. You might find yourself dusting yourself off like the quarterback after a blitz. Then again I am the wimp who is avoiding using his $700 wall art for its intended purpose.
I just got some rollers and am up and at 'em (it took be a few @#$%^&* times but I'm there). Set it up against a wall and set both breaks, keep your elbow/shoulder on the wall and start peddling. Get up to speed and focus on an object in front of you bike. Keep your arms stiff and spin.
 

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I have a spin bike and rollers. I only use the spin bike for hard intervals because it's hard to do that on rollers. I also use it if I'm training late at night because it's virtually silent unlike rollers and I live in a loft so there aren't any separate rooms. I prefer riding on the rollers as the feel is better. The spin bike never quite feels like riding an actual bicycle. The rollers take some getting used to and you can't really zone out like on a trainer, but I like that you have to focus on staying upright. It gets easier though, I do most of my roller rides in the aero bars now to get used to the position.
 

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jkuo said:
I have a spin bike and rollers. I only use the spin bike for hard intervals because it's hard to do that on rollers. I also use it if I'm training late at night because it's virtually silent unlike rollers and I live in a loft so there aren't any separate rooms. I prefer riding on the rollers as the feel is better. The spin bike never quite feels like riding an actual bicycle. The rollers take some getting used to and you can't really zone out like on a trainer, but I like that you have to focus on staying upright. It gets easier though, I do most of my roller rides in the aero bars now to get used to the position.

'Zactly. I had a spin bike and I hated every minute of it. I never felt like I "fit" on a spin bike. with a good bike fit, you feel a part of the bike. So the spin bike went to Craigs list.

I can kinda watch TV on rollers, but I still need to concentrate on what I'm doing. On a trainer, you can forget about what your doing and "escape" the tedium with a movie.
 

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Get a set of 3" Kreitler rollers. The poly model with the plastic cap ends are less expensive and as well built as the alloy ends. Both units have the same warranty. The 3" provide a level of resistance, so you don't need to buy the flywheel or fan.

Some people say rollers are difficult to ride. They do take a day or 2 getting used to but once you get the hang of it, you will have no problem. Just ride them in a doorway, near a workbench or something else you can use to hold you up at first, just in case by lose your balance.
 

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spx5002k said:
Just too Big: that is what I have been told when it comes to training inside. Any suggested brands?
To me, rollers are superior simply because I'm not bored out of my skull when I ride them. Hence, I RIDE THEM. And contrary to popular belief, they're not particularly difficult to ride. I'm certainly not the best bike handler out there, but riding the rollers while watching a movie, ballgame, training vid, etc., is pretty easy.

IMO, Kreitler and E-Motion are at the top of the list; I have both, and each have their merits.

I can stand and hammer on the E-Motions, they have maybe the best realistic feel since they're "suspended". They're actually difficult to ride OFF of, with the little roller/bumpers on the front and "catch bars" in the rear.

The Kreitlers are for big power days, I can output 1000+ watts with the use of the Killer Headwind resistance unit and lowering my tire pressure a bit.

Either are great rollers, well made, and will last for many, many years.
 

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Get rollers. You will maintain and perhaps improve balance-related skills. Rollers offer some semblance of actual bike riding. Doing intervals on rollers, and indeed just riding them, is harder than a trainer or a stationary bike, but that's the point. I don't see a huge benefit in developing power on a bike when you don't have to balance yourself because I have hard time believing that such power will fully transfer over onto a moving bike.
 
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