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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
O.K. there are multiple threads throughout concerning sidewall failures and/or Tyvek booting. 100% of the conclusions are, don't do it for long and never on a front tire.

Now what about a puncture from a roofing nail directly in the center of the tread? Twice I have had to pull out first a staple/brad and then a roofing nail right from the center of the contact patch. This leaves behind probably a 2mm hole in the tire through to the inside where the hole is greatly reduced in diameter. A little Shoe Goo on the outside of the contact patch and an oval Tyvek boot glued to the inside of the tire seems like a solid repair.

So what do you think? Same answer as with the sidewall failure, don't ride it!?? Training tire only or good enough to race on? Most of us already have tires with little divots in them from road flints, but any debris that puntures the tube usually goes right through the cords to some degree.
 

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Tough to say without looking at the puncture and seeing how bad the carcass fabric is torn. You will get diverse responses on your question because of differences in perception of what some consider repairable or not.
What I do is look at the puncture from the inside of the tire. If the carcass is punctured but not torn I boot it, shoe-goo it and keep an eye on it. Not an exact science.
 

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O.K. there are multiple threads throughout concerning sidewall failures and/or Tyvek booting. 100% of the conclusions are, don't do it for long and never on a front tire.

Now what about a puncture from a roofing nail directly in the center of the tread? Twice I have had to pull out first a staple/brad and then a roofing nail right from the center of the contact patch. This leaves behind probably a 2mm hole in the tire through to the inside where the hole is greatly reduced in diameter. A little Shoe Goo on the outside of the contact patch and an oval Tyvek boot glued to the inside of the tire seems like a solid repair.

So what do you think? Same answer as with the sidewall failure, don't ride it!?? Training tire only or good enough to race on? Most of us already have tires with little divots in them from road flints, but any debris that puntures the tube usually goes right through the cords to some degree.
In addition to cycling, I'm also an avid motorcyclist. I've successfully used radial tire patches on quite a number of occasions where the puncture is through the tread. In a clean tread puncture (as opposed to a sidewall puncture, clean or not), the structure of the tire is not compromised and the patch merely serves to seal things.

Once I've properly patched my cycle tire, I don't give things a second thought and in over 30 years, have never had an issue. Though most of my fellow motorcyclists would agree, there is a substantial - and vocal - minority who insist this is unsafe and will further insist on replacing, rather than repairing, a punctured tire.

I'm confident that this model also holds for bicycle tires, i. e., a tread puncture has relatively little effect on the structural integrity of the tire. That being the case, a properly applied patch should not be a cause for concern - all it's doing is providing a bit of assurance that the tube won't press out through the puncture hole - which is probably unlikely even without a patch for small punctures.

I would not under any circumstances, patch a sidewall puncture on any tire (bike, cycle, car, riding lawn mower . . .) and return that tire to service,

Just my opinion however, and worth every penny you paid for it.
 

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I have glued a large tube patch to the inside of a almost new tire then filled the hole with Shoe Goo or similar and recreationally ridden that tire on the back until it is worn out. Never tried Tyvek gluing. I routinely look over my tires when pumping up my tires prior to every ride and would not do high speed declines with a booted tire.
 

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A large hole in the tread area of the casing will cause a small bulge when inflated. You will likely feel a little thump as it contacts the ground. It should be fine to ride as the tread area is the most reinforced, but may be a bit annoying.

I agree with Easyup and would avoid high speed descents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all. Two nail punctures in a row can get to be expensive. I guess the high speed decent would be the one scenario I wouldn't want. Any normal loss of air from the rear tire and I would simply be sitting down on it.

Makes it even better when a town takes federal funding for a bike lane, then never cleans or sweeps it, allows parked cars on it, etc. Just playing politics.
 

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A large hole in the tread area of the casing will cause a small bulge when inflated. You will likely feel a little thump as it contacts the ground. It should be fine to ride as the tread area is the most reinforced, but may be a bit annoying.
The key question on any boot is whether there is a bulge after the boot is in place, and how big the bulge is. If there is no bulge then there is no issue - the tire is fine to ride in any conditions. A small bulge anywhere near the running surface of the tread means that you will have faster wear at that point and the tire will be worn out much quicker than normal. Generally front tires don't wear at all (lose rubber) but with a bulge in the casing they will.

As the bulge gets bigger then the concern gets greater. Different people have both different experiences and different levels of tolerance so there is no hard and fast rule for when a tire boot is not sufficient.
 
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