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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had my bike for 4 years now and have right at 16,000 miles on it. Pretty good amount of miles for GrandPa. Anyway recently I have noticed that when I stop at the signal getting out of the neighborhood the front brake kind of has a spot where it grabs the rim and is kind of pulsating as I stop. So I figured maybe new brake pads are in order since the rim itself looks real nice (2 years old). I have the H+ son archtype rim and those of you that are familiar with it know that the rim butt is so good that you cannot find it unless you remove the tire and look inside.

Anyway I looked on-line and cannot find the exact same pad as my current model. So I just thought why not rotate the brake pads. I did and now the bike is back to perfect. The brake pads are not directional and are the solid rubber type (no insert type thing) so I went front to back and cross corner. Anyway I am good for a few years I imagine.

I guess I could buy a new set of the brakes for the pads for $60.00 or buy a set of 4 Ultegra pads for about $30.00. I will decide on that in a few years when I need them.

In all these years I never considered rotating my brake pads but now I will just keep that in mind as a quick fix.
 

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I guess I could buy a new set of the brakes for the pads for $60.00 or buy a set of 4 Ultegra pads for about $30.00. I will decide on that in a few years when I need them.
Or you could buy a set of Kool Stop pads and holders and have better braking performance and better adjustability than you had when the bike was new.
 

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I have had my bike for 4 years now and have right at 16,000 miles on it. Pretty good amount of miles for GrandPa. Anyway recently I have noticed that when I stop at the signal getting out of the neighborhood the front brake kind of has a spot where it grabs the rim and is kind of pulsating as I stop. So I figured maybe new brake pads are in order since the rim itself looks real nice (2 years old). I have the H+ son archtype rim and those of you that are familiar with it know that the rim butt is so good that you cannot find it unless you remove the tire and look inside.

Anyway I looked on-line and cannot find the exact same pad as my current model. So I just thought why not rotate the brake pads. I did and now the bike is back to perfect. The brake pads are not directional and are the solid rubber type (no insert type thing) so I went front to back and cross corner. Anyway I am good for a few years I imagine.

I guess I could buy a new set of the brakes for the pads for $60.00 or buy a set of 4 Ultegra pads for about $30.00. I will decide on that in a few years when I need them.

In all these years I never considered rotating my brake pads but now I will just keep that in mind as a quick fix.
Simple things: scuff the braking surface of the pad with sandpaper and rub the brake track on the rim with a ScotchBrite pad. This will have the desired effect (assuming the pulsing is not do to a deformation in the rim sidewall).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Simple things: scuff the braking surface of the pad with sandpaper and rub the brake track on the rim with a ScotchBrite pad. This will have the desired effect (assuming the pulsing is not do to a deformation in the rim sidewall).
Good tip, thanks but the brake pad rotation took care of it.. If I have a problem down the road I will try that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Must live someplace perfectly flat where you never need to brake to get 16,000 miles out of a set of pads!
No, I live in a hilly area. Most of the rides I go on do not require braking or very little. Currently my Strava data shows 3600 miles and 157,000 ft of climbing for the year. We do have some Cat 2 climbs around which require significant braking on the descent but I do not ride up them much. My regular loop that I have ridden countless times is 23mi and 900 feet of climbing. One kind of fun downhill that lets you spin out and then coast. Then back home without ever touching the brakes.
 

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Must live someplace perfectly flat where you never need to brake to get 16,000 miles out of a set of pads!
I live in a moderately hilly area and my brake pads have 20,000 miles on them with nowhere near worn out. It's not how hilly it is, it's how much you have to brake. You could do a lot of braking in flat country if you had a lot of stops with cross traffic or stop lights, and you could do virtually no braking if your downhills are straight with long runouts.
 

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Gee, I live in a city, do a good bit of "near country" riding on moderately hilly terrain, and I rarely get more than about 2000 miles out of a set of pads. Heck, 16000 miles would be about average for my car!
 

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Gee, I live in a city, do a good bit of "near country" riding on moderately hilly terrain, and I rarely get more than about 2000 miles out of a set of pads. Heck, 16000 miles would be about average for my car!
As Kerry noted above, it's more about your riding/driving style. 2000 miles would hardly have my pads properly worn in and the last time I changed pads on my vehicle (mini-van) they had over 90,000 miles on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I cannot say I know much about brake pad wear but I suppose in addition to time spent actually braking I guess the brake pad's themselves probably have different life spans and the rim should make a difference. My son bought a Cannondale Cadd 10 about 4 years ago and the Shimano wheels have a rim butt the size of Grand Canyon on them. I imagine that would take it's toll on a pad. However those wheels are actually still hanging in the garage with maybe 20 miles on them. Anyway the braking surface on the rim is probably very important for brake pad wear especially if the braking surface is to narrow or it has one of those grooves down the middle as a wear indicator which would reduce braking surface.
Anyway I use H+ Archtype rims and the braking surface is enough that the entire pad fits on the surface and the rim butt is perfectly smooth and it's so nice you cannot find it without taking the tire off and looking inside the rim. It's an aluminum rim and I think of amazing quality.. I have no experience with carbon rims.

Yesterday I went out in the cold and rode an easy 25mi in the hills. I did not use my brakes during the ride. I climbed about 1000 feet but the downhills associated with it just do not call for brakes. There was a pretty large tartantula on the road yesterday and I almost stopped to take a picture of it but I did not in the end. We always have tartantula's on the road this time of the year. They are males walking around looking for a female. Not poisonous but palm sized spiders.
 

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As Kerry noted above, it's more about your riding/driving style. 2000 miles would hardly have my pads properly worn in and the last time I changed pads on my vehicle (mini-van) they had over 90,000 miles on them.
I think it's more so about how wet are the roads, how much grit do you pick up and how clean do you keep your rims.
Even very little braking destroys pads if you ride in the rain and pick up grit and pads seem to last forever regardless of braking habit if they and the rims are always clean and dry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think it's more so about how wet are the roads, how much grit do you pick up and how clean do you keep your rims.
Even very little braking destroys pads if you ride in the rain and pick up grit and pads seem to last forever regardless of braking habit if they and the rims are always clean and dry.
Good point. Yesterday after my ride I picked up a lot of grit on the bike because it had rained the night before. The brake surfaces were very dirty. I spend probably an hour cleaning my bike after a ride of that type. I use 409 and a shop rag.
 
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