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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering if I could get an opinion. I will be looking at these 2 bikes soon - my first real road bike. I know I need to ride them to see if one "feels better."

My main question is that the Roubaix is full carbon and the via nirone is aluminum with carbon forks. I don't think I'll be able to tell the difference on a 3-5 mile ride.

Both cost about the same. The Roubaix is Shimano 105 equipped and the Bianchi is Campy Veloce.

So, I guess my question is, will a full carbon frame be significantly more comfortable on longer rides as compared to an Al/Carbon?

Thanks for the advice.
 

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i cant comment on the Bianchi but i bought an 09 roubaix elite just over a week ago and already have put over 150 miles on it, its more comfortable on the road than my stumpjumper, no bs, i dont think you could possibly get a more comfortable rigid bike,


now if you ask me does it flex? is it stiff? to me its stiff but im new to road bikes and some person with more experience may say otherwise, i can tell you though that i love it!!!!
 

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Orthodoc said:
I was wondering if I could get an opinion. I will be looking at these 2 bikes soon - my first real road bike. I know I need to ride them to see if one "feels better."

My main question is that the Roubaix is full carbon and the via nirone is aluminum with carbon forks. I don't think I'll be able to tell the difference on a 3-5 mile ride.

Both cost about the same. The Roubaix is Shimano 105 equipped and the Bianchi is Campy Veloce.

So, I guess my question is, will a full carbon frame be significantly more comfortable on longer rides as compared to an Al/Carbon?

Thanks for the advice.
As we like to say here, fit matters most, so let that be your guiding force. Seeing as this is your first real road bike, work with a LBS that has a knowledgeable fitter - some shops are better than others in that respect.

That said, there are several things about the Roubaix that (IMO) make it a better choice. The Bianchi is actually a materials mix of CF and ALU - CF seat stays bonded at the seat cluster and dropouts. I can honestly say that I've never ridden a bike with a CF rear that had any noticeable improvement in ride over an all aluminum bike. A CF fork will smooth the ride and absorb some of the vibration/ road harshness. Both have that, but the Roubaix's is full CF with an OS crown race.

The geo of the bikes is similar, but the Roubaix will offer a slightly less aggressive position because of the added HT length - allowing for higher bars. Also, the wheelbase appears to be longer on the Roubaix, which smoothes the ride and contributes to more predictable handling.

Regarding components. A couple of things worth noting: IME Shimano's 105 group is superior to Campy's Veloce, and the FSA crankset is inferior to the Shimano crank on the Roubaix. Try as I might, I could find no mention of Bianchi's warranty on their website. Specialized is among the best in the business - lifetime on the frameset (original owner). Even Trek limits theirs to 5 years on forks.

Bottom line, though is what you think. So get fitted, go for a real test ride with both bikes, put them through their paces and decide from there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info. Indeed, fit will be a huge factor, but the do appear to have similar geometries. Thanks for the detailed response.
 

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the crank on the roubaix elite is an SGX? i dont know of it but it got some negativity in an 09 allez elite review where they said it was a no name crank and lacked the hollowtech technology of the new 105, still im happy enough with it.
 

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darkest_fugue said:
the crank on the roubaix elite is an SGX? i dont know of it but it got some negativity in an 09 allez elite review where they said it was a no name crank and lacked the hollowtech technology of the new 105, still im happy enough with it.
The chainrings have the SGX designation. The predecessor was SG (Superglide), then the SG-X model was adapted - they were initially used on the XTR cranks.

The source: (scroll down to the Shimano explanation)
http://www.bikepro.com/products/cranks/chainrings.html

I don't know who the reviewer was or who they were writing for, but your Shimano crankset is by no means a 'no name'. No, it's not top of the line, but neither is the FSA. My $$ says the Shimano will hold up better.
 

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Orthodoc said:
Thanks for the info. Indeed, fit will be a huge factor, but the do appear to have similar geometries. Thanks for the detailed response.
I brought up the geo for ride/ handling purposes. 'Similar' can translate into a number of things, like... close, but not as good... or, both fit well... or, neither fit very well. Food for thought. :)
 
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