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· TheHeadlessThompsonGunner
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Travel is going to force me off the bike, at least regularly, for the next two to eight months. I'm going to need to do something to stay sane, let alone fit. I own running shoes, and have done some running in the past, but it seems that every time I come even close to trying to replicate the aerobic workout of a four to six hour ride, I just cripple myself. Part of it is starting too fast, but I don't know how to "start slow." And I'm sure it doesn't help that I'm strong and very aerobically fit, but really, really skinny, and tend to waste away even further when I don't ride. (I'm a case-study of the adage, "the better you get at cycling, the worse you get at everything else.")

Can anyone recommend a good book about running? It doesn't need to be geared toward cyclists. I just need something that will help me develop good technique - not necessarily specific workouts, training and racing, etc., but I'm sure it will contain that stuff no matter what... Thanks!
 

· Scary Teddy Bear
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· Humanity...or....Vanity?
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Wow Phys, you buy your shoes from the Running Room (you must have some serious disposable cash)?

I run in the Asics Nimbus and they go for $180 CAD ($177 USD) on the Running Room site. That is crazy.

They normally retail in the US locally for $120 and I never pay more than $100-$110 USD.

By the way Scotty if your foot is neutral the Asics Nimbus is worth a serious look for the Clydes (you should get about 300-400 miles per pair).
 

· Scary Teddy Bear
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dwwheels said:
Wow Phys, you buy your shoes from the Running Room (you must have some serious disposable cash)?

I run in the Asics Nimbus and they go for $180 CAD ($177 USD) on the Running Room site. That is crazy.

They normally retail in the US locally for $120 and I never pay more than $100-$110 USD.

By the way Scotty if your foot is neutral the Asics Nimbus is worth a serious look for the Clydes (you should get about 300-400 miles per pair).

Nah, I buy my shoes from Dicks usually. I'm running in Asics GT shoes (two pairs) right now. We got to the running room for clothes, mainly cause they're the only place that we can find the shorts that my wife really likes.....she also buys her shoes there.:thumbsup:
 

· Humanity...or....Vanity?
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Not sure about that one. I would hit a local shop and just try on as many shoes as you can. I found a shop that will let me run in them (a couple runs of no more than 5K will be enough) and exchange them if they don't work out.
 

· Registered
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run times, not distances. Start with 15 minutes and never increase by more than 10%. I started too fast at first and developed severe ITBS which kept me from running at all for 2 months. You don't want to do that.

Focus on landing with your feet flat, not on the outside or inside of your foot, and try to run on the middle of your foot and not on your heel or toes. Toe running puts too much stress on your legs long distances plus you can't really develop a relaxed pace form with it, and running on your heels stops your momentum every step. It's like applying the brakes every time you put your feet down.

Hope those tips help. Good luck with the running, and do your best to start slow.
 

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Applesauce said:
Can anyone recommend a good book about running? It doesn't need to be geared toward cyclists. I just need something that will help me develop good technique - not necessarily specific workouts, training and racing, etc., but I'm sure it will contain that stuff no matter what... Thanks!
I say screw the book- at least at first- and go to a specialty running store. If you are going to run regularly, its not a bad idea to have two pair of shoes to alternate between. This helps for several reasons- two big ones is that it keeps your ankle and foot muscles stay strong as they don't have the same support in the same places for each run. 2nd, alternating shows allows the support in the shoe to fully rebound- something that might not happen overnight.

While you are at the store- ask the guy to watch you run. They will check out your stride from several angles and tell you things to work on. Some are really good at this, and can help you avoid knee injuries.
 

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My personal experience: it is a complete misconception to think that the correct pair of shoes can correct for bad form and poor fitness, and prevent injury.

Running became actually enjoyable for me after I adopted the high-cadence, mid- to forefoot landing style. Pose running and Chi running are two popular "schools", but AFAIK it's essentially the same core idea. IMO a shoe that tries to "correct" for "over" pronation, "flat" feet, or any number of perceived "defects", is more likely to do harm than good.
 

· TheHeadlessThompsonGunner
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
pretender said:
My personal experience: it is a complete misconception to think that the correct pair of shoes can correct for bad form and poor fitness, and prevent injury.
I agree. That's why I'm looking for something to work on my technique. (But thanks everyone for your shoe recommendations...)

I went to Fleet Feet not too long ago and got the whole shebang, filmed on a treadmill, fitted to three dozen shoes, etc. Running doesn't hurt me in a way that I can trace - at least not wholly - back to shoes. It makes EVERYTHING hurt. And while I don't race much anymore, I'm a complete pro-ho, and I'm pretty damn fit on the bike. I want to translate some of that fitness to running, without feeling after and hour's run like I was hit by truck after a ten hour ride.

I like the suggestion of starting with fifteen minutes. I had usually tried to start - I've started running a lot of times... - with thirty or forty-five minutes, because after anything less I don't feel like I got any kind of a proper (aerobic) workout.
 

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My 2cents.

Like all those with a change in lifestyle brought on by a new family, I traded in the 1-2hr daily ride for 30-45 minute run.

1) The only remote pleasure I find in running comes from the trail.
2) Buy good shoes from someone that knows what they're doing. My IT bands still hurt from a 20 mile trail run on worn out old shoes.
3) Don't expect to kill your buddies on the local climb b/c you run a lot. I'm a much better runner but at the EXPENSE of cycling. More riding makes a better cyclist not a lot of running. (Obviously you'll be bettter off than if you did not run at all).
4) Go early before you wake up so it is less boring.

+1 on Chi.
 

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maglia vecchia said:
I traded in the 1-2hr daily ride for 30-45 minute run.

[...]

2) Buy good shoes from someone that knows what they're doing. My IT bands still hurt from a 20 mile trail run on worn out old shoes.
Are you quite certain you wouldn't have hurt your IT bands from that 20 mile trail run on the "correct" pair of shoes?
 

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pretender said:
Are you quite certain you wouldn't have hurt your IT bands from that 20 mile trail run on the "correct" pair of shoes?
Not sure of much when it comes to running. The general consensus around my "injury" or strain was: too much running and really old shoes. Don't wish to repeat the run with good shoes to see if IT bands hold up.
 

· Scary Teddy Bear
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Bs

pretender said:
My personal experience: it is a complete misconception to think that the correct pair of shoes can correct for bad form and poor fitness, and prevent injury.

Running became actually enjoyable for me after I adopted the high-cadence, mid- to forefoot landing style. Pose running and Chi running are two popular "schools", but AFAIK it's essentially the same core idea. IMO a shoe that tries to "correct" for "over" pronation, "flat" feet, or any number of perceived "defects", is more likely to do harm than good.

It's true that the shoe folks try to over sell their stability shoes, as they cost more, but people with mild to moderate overpronation NEED additional support.

For example, my wife tried to run in normal shoes, and then in enhanced stability shoes....she pronates so wickedly that it's kinda scary, marked pes planus deformities bilaterally....just how she's built....she ended up with a pretty bad Posterior Tibial Tendinitis and ended up in a Cam Boot for 6 weeks. She had custom orthotics made, and now can run comfortably....

Bottom line. you can work on your technique and form ALL friggin day if you want, and you should, as they are important, BUT IF your ankles and feet are anatomically abnormal with either severe flat feet OR overpronation, then you will need enhanced stability within your shoes. Now, if your symptoms are mild....not severe like my wifes, then the shoes themselves can by adding a medial post, and heel support provide more stability, but if you're situation is real bad, then you may even need orthotics.

Running form doesn't correct anatomic abnormalities, BUT it might prevent overuse injuries like periostitis (shin splints).
 

· Old, slow, and fat.
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I've found over the years that running helps my riding much more'n riding helps my running. Not that I'm a serious runner by any means. I'm a hasher after all! (yeah, as seen on TV!) Mixed surfaces, trails, etc. all make running MUCH more enjoyable than 'running' iffen ya know what I mean. Kinda like riding a cyclocross bike... Where's THAT go!? Let's go find out!

As an added benefit, the softer surfaces off-road aren't as hard on yer legs/body.

I'm running in Brooks Adrenalin trail shoes. Not so bad for mixed surface running with an emphasis on easier terrain, but the built-in stability ain't the best bet for true off-road running. Think I'm gonna get another pair of Cascadias for that.

I really, really enjoy trail running, but have a moral issue driving to go do it. Hashing I can justify 'cause its a social outlet too.

Good luck!

M
 

· Rocket Scientist
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Before I decided to give cycling a go again this year, I tried running a marathon last year. I never ran before in my life. But with cycling, when I started 10 years before, group rides helped me get better and figure stuff out. So I joined a running group here in Denver. It was a huge help. I got coaching, peer help, and a group to run with. It made a huge difference. I broke my foot 5 weeks in but before that, I ran a 1:40 half marathon in training and began to get a real feel for running. I decided that I didn't like it nearly as much as cycling, thus I decided to come back to cycling, but I enjoyed it enough that after the national championships in October, I'll start doing shorter running races (5k, 5 mile, and 10k) races through the winter. And I'll join back up with the running group.

So while the books are good, a running group is what did it for me. Without that, I doubt I could have gotten through any decent running.
 
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