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I know there is no one that can tell me what saddle will work for me but I was wondering if riders that use a saddle with a cut out notice a real difference versus a saddle without one?

Right now I am on a San Marco Power Ponza. I like the shape, length, and width of the San Marco but notice if I am in the drops for a extended period or on a set of rollers for more than 10 mins I start to go numb.

Looking at possible going to the Porlogo Nago PAS since it is similar to the San Marco but with a cut out. I would think it would help but just do not know anyone that rides a cut out nor does any shop have a test saddle with a cut-out in it to try out for a few days.

Thanks
 

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It seems to help. I just got a Selle Italia Max Flite Gel and the cutout seems to work.
Now if I can get my extremities to keep from going numb, I'll be set!
Of course, as always w/ saddles, YMMV.
 

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If you're going numb you're seriously on the wrong saddle, cutout or not. You need a saddle that fits the bones in your backside. They come in different widths, not just different designs.
 

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Seven step program

fireplug said:
I know there is no one that can tell me what saddle will work for me but I was wondering if riders that use a saddle with a cut out notice a real difference versus a saddle without one?

Right now I am on a San Marco Power Ponza. I like the shape, length, and width of the San Marco but notice if I am in the drops for a extended period or on a set of rollers for more than 10 mins I start to go numb.

Looking at possible going to the Porlogo Nago PAS since it is similar to the San Marco but with a cut out. I would think it would help but just do not know anyone that rides a cut out nor does any shop have a test saddle with a cut-out in it to try out for a few days.
Some people love cutout saddles, while others hate them. No one can tell what will work for you. However there are 7 factors in preventing saddle numbness and pain:

1) saddle adjustment - tilt angle is very important

2) sitting properly - a lot of people ride too far forward on the saddle. Your "sit bones" should be perched on the rear, wide part of the saddle

3) standing up - you should never let things go numb or get painful. At the first sign of any lack of feeling or pain, pedal standing up for a short distance and repeat as necessary to bring the feeling back and prevent further numbness

4) easing up - you want to lift your butt off the saddle any time you are going to hit a bump or sharp edge. It's easier on your anatomy, your wheels, your tires, and the rest of your bike.

5) bike fit: in addition to saddle height and tilt, there is fore/aft adjustment, reach and drop to the bars, cleat position.

6) tires: proper width with the right PSI for your weight and roads so you don't feel every single road imperfection.

7) saddle - there are some people who can ride most any saddle if it is properly adjusted (see #1) and there are some people who have problems with nearly any saddle. It's hard to predict which type you are. Work on 1-6 and if that doesn't help, THEN consider a new saddle.

The standard advice to cure numbness is to tip the nose down, but having discussed this topic many times, it seems that some people are not sitting properly on their saddles. You need to have a saddle and saddle position that has your sit bones on the butt of the saddle. If your saddle nose is tipped down too far, it may cause you to slide forward. If it is tipped up too far, it may be causing pressure. And if you can't get things right in between these points, it may be that you are not sitting in the right spot or that the saddle doesn't fit you. IME, the range of saddle tilt goes from "nose level" to saddle level. Nose level means that for most saddles, the butt of the saddle is elevated (this is how I ride). Saddle level means that a level placed on the saddle would have the nose and butt level, which may create a hammock effect in the middle. Your personal comfort has to rule on where to place things in this range. Also, fore/aft position can influence comfort - it is a trade between pedaling style and the how much you lean on the bars vs. sit on the saddle.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
4) easing up - you want to lift your butt off the saddle any time you are going to hit a bump or sharp edge. It's easier on your anatomy, your wheels, your tires, and the rest of your bike.
Kerry - genuinely curious as a newbie...why would lifting off the saddle affect anything but me and the seat post? It's still the same amount of weight on the wheels and tires, right? Or does standing allow my knees to absorb more of the impact maybe?
 

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Silver - yes your knees do act as a shock absorber, but there are also other things going on. If you're standing and are about to hit a bump or sharp edge, your body shifts to the back of the bike taking the weight off the front when you're front wheel hits and by the time you're back hits, you shift your body to the front, taking weight off the rear wheel. The movements are natural and very subtle if you're lifting off the saddle.
 

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If you're going numb, you need to....

1) Stand for one ot two pedal strokes every few minutes.

2 Push harder on the pedals.

3) Ride more.
 

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Thanks for the reply

Thank you for your response felix5150 - I will definitely pay attention to that next time I am out. That's not something I have considered on motorcycles or my suspension-fork hybrid. At a little over 200lbs and running 700x23 tires, I am always a little concerned about the wheels.
 

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Larry Lackapants
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fireplug said:
I know there is no one that can tell me what saddle will work for me but I was wondering if riders that use a saddle with a cut out notice a real difference versus a saddle without one?

Right now I am on a San Marco Power Ponza. I like the shape, length, and width of the San Marco but notice if I am in the drops for a extended period or on a set of rollers for more than 10 mins I start to go numb.

Looking at possible going to the Porlogo Nago PAS since it is similar to the San Marco but with a cut out. I would think it would help but just do not know anyone that rides a cut out nor does any shop have a test saddle with a cut-out in it to try out for a few days.

Thanks
Well in theory the cutout should be helpful. but you must take into account that the saddle with the cutout is not the same saddle any more
- its more flexible in the zone of the cutout
- the manufacturer might have taken some padding measures to accomodate the cutout - less / more / differently placed padding.

you might decide that the same saddle with a cutout fits you even less.
agree that numbness or any other discomfort must be addressed but i;m afraid it's still trial and error. (In case you can try out the cutut saddle, it might be a good starting point for the search of the new saddle)
 

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RRRoubaix said:
It seems to help. I just got a Selle Italia Max Flite Gel and the cutout seems to work.
Now if I can get my extremities to keep from going numb, I'll be set!
Of course, as always w/ saddles, YMMV.
+1, been using the Mx Flite Gel since May and no problems, great saddle
 

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SilverStretch said:
Kerry - genuinely curious as a newbie...why would lifting off the saddle affect anything but me and the seat post? It's still the same amount of weight on the wheels and tires, right? Or does standing allow my knees to absorb more of the impact maybe?
In addition to what felix5150 says, standing up allows the bike to rock up/down independently of what your body is doing.

Asad
 
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