Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased my first "real" road bike from an LBS, and was fitted.
After 15 miles on my second day I have come to notice that the stock saddle is for shorter rides. So I am thinking about changing the saddle to a better , more comfortable one.
1.) Would I need to be fitted once again with the swap?
2.) OR do I do quick measurments with the stock saddle on, switch it and match the measurments?
3.) :confused:

Also, which saddles do you recommend? I am looking for one that fits my budget (no more than $75) fizik? san marco?
whats up with the saddles that fall forward ( as if melted) ?

thanks for your time / replies
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,019 Posts
blacklabel said:
I recently purchased my first "real" road bike from an LBS, and was fitted.
After 15 miles on my second day I have come to notice that the stock saddle is for shorter rides. So I am thinking about changing the saddle to a better , more comfortable one.
1.) Would I need to be fitted once again with the swap?
2.) OR do I do quick measurments with the stock saddle on, switch it and match the measurments?
3.) :confused:

Also, which saddles do you recommend? I am looking for one that fits my budget (no more than $75) fizik? san marco?
whats up with the saddles that fall forward ( as if melted) ?

thanks for your time / replies
You don't offer much in the way of previous cycling experience or amount of saddle time you've put in on the new bike, so you may want to give this saddle a fair chance, because you'll have to do the same if you buy another.

First, some questions...

Why do you think the OEM saddle is for shorter rides? Are you experiencing discomfort on the bike? And along those lines, what would make the saddle more comfortable?

To answer your questions...

Depending on how careful you were taking measurements, you may be able to swap saddles without fit assistance. But because saddles come in a multitude of shapes and sizes, you shouldn't use points of reference from (for example) saddle tip to bars, because another saddle might not be as long, or is longer.

In this instance, saddle height won't change, so that can be noted and duplicated. Tilt is either level or slightly tip up, so that can be noted as well, but KOPS +/- should be checked beforehand, then readjusted to the same point once the new saddle is installed.

If you're confident that you can reliably take these measurements, then it's likely you can install and adjust a new saddle without assitance. OTOH, if you're unsure, have a knowledgeable fitter assist you.

As for recommendations, saddles being very personal items (like helmets and shoes), I suggest finding a demo program or at least making sure the store you purchase from has a 30 day (minimum) return policy.

As a last resort, if you now have a road bike, consider using that saddle on your new bike to see if you notice a difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,832 Posts
Saddle comfort

blacklabel said:
I recently purchased my first "real" road bike from an LBS, and was fitted.
After 15 miles on my second day I have come to notice that the stock saddle is for shorter rides. So I am thinking about changing the saddle to a better , more comfortable one.
1.) Would I need to be fitted once again with the swap?
2.) OR do I do quick measurments with the stock saddle on, switch it and match the measurments?
3.) :confused:

Also, which saddles do you recommend? I am looking for one that fits my budget (no more than $75) fizik? san marco? whats up with the saddles that fall forward ( as if melted) ?
There are 7 factors in preventing saddle numbness and pain:

1) saddle adjustment - tilt angle is very important

2) sitting properly - a lot of people ride too far forward on the saddle. Your "sit bones" should be perched on the rear, wide part of the saddle

3) standing up - you should never let things go numb or get painful. At the first sign of any lack of feeling or pain, pedal standing up for a short distance and repeat as necessary to bring the feeling back and prevent further numbness

4) easing up - you want to lift your butt off the saddle any time you are going to hit a bump or sharp edge. It's easier on your anatomy, your wheels, your tires, and the rest of your bike.

5) bike fit: in addition to saddle height and tilt, there is fore/aft adjustment, reach and drop to the bars, cleat position.

6) tires: proper width with the right PSI for your weight and roads so you don't feel every single road imperfection.

7) saddle - there are some people who can ride most any saddle if it is properly adjusted (see #1) and there are some people who have problems with nearly any saddle. It's hard to predict which type you are. Work on 1-6 and if that doesn't help, THEN consider a new saddle.

The standard advice to cure numbness is to tip the nose down, but having discussed this topic many times, it seems that some people are not sitting properly on their saddles. You need to have a saddle and saddle position that has your sit bones on the butt of the saddle. If your saddle nose is tipped down too far, it may cause you to slide forward. If it is tipped up too far, it may be causing pressure. And if you can't get things right in between these points, it may be that you are not sitting in the right spot or that the saddle doesn't fit you. IME, the range of saddle tilt goes from "nose level" to saddle level. Nose level means that for most saddles, the butt of the saddle is elevated (this is how I ride). Saddle level means that a level placed on the saddle would have the nose and butt level, which may create a hammock effect in the middle. Your personal comfort has to rule on where to place things in this range. Also, fore/aft position can influence comfort - it is a trade between pedaling style and the how much you lean on the bars vs. sit on the saddle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,652 Posts
You probably got a San Marco Ponza with your bike. I think getting a new saddle is what you should do, but you should get fitted again,

I changed my saddle earlier in the year and glad I went back to the shop to get fitted. There was a lit to consider.

$75 limits your choices. I suggest tough it out until you can spend a little more. I would try to demo a few, but you should be a very long ride. The saddle might feel good a 20, but 50 might be another stoey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
PJ352 said:
You don't offer much in the way of previous cycling experience or amount of saddle time you've put in on the new bike, so you may want to give this saddle a fair chance, because you'll have to do the same if you buy another.

First, some questions...

Why do you think the OEM saddle is for shorter rides? Are you experiencing discomfort on the bike? And along those lines, what would make the saddle more comfortable
thanks for the replies.
I used to ride here and there but not often enough in the past beacuse the bike I had before was too big for me . so far I have done 20 miles in total . I am giving this saddle a fair chance but.....dont know for how long
The discomfort is on my sit bones. Right when I get on the saddle my sit bones hurt
I have a Trek 2.1 , and have read a lot of reivews saying that the stock saddle was the first thing they changed beacuse of how hard it was .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,776 Posts
blacklabel said:
thanks for the replies.
I used to ride here and there but not often enough in the past beacuse the bike I had before was too big for me . so far I have done 20 miles in total . I am giving this saddle a fair chance but.....dont know for how long .
I think you need to give it a little more chance.

The discomfort is on my sit bones. Right when I get on the saddle my sit bones hurt
This is classic. 20 miles is just enough for you to get sore, and not long enough to start to recover. Even with a perfectly fitting saddle, you're putting pressure on places that don't normally experience much presssure. You'll be sore for a while, then your body will begin to adapt. This happens even to experienced riders if injury or weather forces them to take a few months off.

That's not to say this saddle is necessarily good for you, but only to say that you can't tell yet. You need at least a week or two more for that soreness to go away, then you can play with adjustment and see if you can make this saddle work.

Sit bone soreness at first, as distinguished from other kinds of discomfort, may actually be a good sign.
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,019 Posts
Based on the info you provided in your second post, I agree that you need to give this saddle more time. It's possible that ultimately it'll get swapped out, but you need to get some saddle time in yet. 20 miles is still a break-in period - for your butt. :)

It is a good sign that your discomfort is at the sit bones, because that says the saddle is a good fit for you and your weight distribution on the bike is good.

Give it some time.
 

·
What the what???
Joined
·
12,986 Posts
While Kerry offers the best step-by-step to dialing in your saddle position, I also agree with PJ352 and JCavilia. The sit-bone soreness suggests that is your primary contact point with the saddle which is a good sign the saddle position and your position on it are both good. I would give it a bit more time. Don't think of it in terms of miles right now, think of it in terms of time in the saddle. Start with shorter periods and gradually increase your time with subsequent rides. If the pain doesn't at least start to improve after a while, then you might consider a saddle with a bit more padding. My guess is, though, that your body will start to become more accustomed to the saddle and it will start to feel better. Keep us posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
+1 to the experts above... You're currently training your butt to do these longer rides if you haven't been riding that far and as often before. Give your stock saddle a chance before throwing money at the problem as you can burn through a lot of dough looking for the wrong fix.
 

·
still shedding season
Joined
·
8,849 Posts
blacklabel said:
The discomfort is on my sit bones. Right when I get on the saddle my sit bones hurt
I have a Trek 2.1 , and have read a lot of reivews saying that the stock saddle was the first thing they changed beacuse of how hard it was .
I have the same bike ('08 so silver/blue) and still using the stock saddle. When I bought the bike that year I was just getting into it so I can't really compare to to other saddles. Whenever I've had pain with it, it was only on the sit bones (I had a "real" fit) and just kept at it. Three hours seemed to be a comfort limit for a while, but that's not so bad anymore. So, most of it was me instead of the saddle.

However, I'm wondering the same thing. If I buy one that has a similar shape but supposedly better (like a Fizik Aliante), would it make longer rides more comfortable?
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top