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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, I just watched a video where the presenter put some tubless tire sealant in tubes, and then tested for puncture sealing. It appeared to work. So, aside from a slight weight gain, is there any downside to doing this?
 

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NO, there is no downside. It is all upside... let us know how it works out, maybe you'll start a revolution.
 

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cost of sealant, time required to put it in tubes...

that's enough to dissuade me from trying it.
 

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I haven't seen the video but I've heard good things with some caveats and considerations that generally go with tubeless tires.

With sealant in the tubes, you will need to use tubes with removable valve cores to get the sealant in.

You get some of the negatives that go with running tubeless such as potential mess with filling and depending on the puncture- both inside and outside the tire.

You also may have issues with clogged valve cores.

You do not want to use CO2 with sealant as it may harden in the tube and be rendered useless or shorten the usable life of the sealant - Technical FAQ: Tire sealant questions | VeloNews.com .

You cannot clean the old or hardened sealant out of a tube, once the sealant is done so is your tube in that regards.

Edit - forgot this one - if you have a puncture that will not seal and you replace your sealant filled tube in the middle of a ride, what are you going to do with the leaky, wet, sealant filled/covered bad tube? Put in your jersey pocket or litter and leave it at the side of the road? (gotta admit it's a pet peeve of mine when selfish riders leave their blown tubes on the side of the road or trail :mad2:)

There might be others, but those come immediately to mind. If you are willing to accept those and possibly other trade offs, then putting sealant in your tubes might be great for you.
 

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Why are u putting co2 in a slimed tube?
I thought the slime was to stop the leak, therefore no co2 required.
and u don't need removable valve stems, just to use a knife & patch.
 

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Not sure if you are being serious, but if you lose enough air on the road before the sealant stops the leak that you need to add air to your tube/tire, you want to use a hand pump not CO2. I know a lot of riders who do not have hand pumps and only carry CO2 inflators. It's just a consideration when using tubeless and sealant filled tubes.

Why would you go to the trouble of cutting and patching when a removable valve core solves that issue without compromising the tube in any way? If you are going to use sealant in you tubes, I guess you can do that, but it's a decent amount of extra work and time that you simply don't need to do for little or no extra cost. Cutting and patching is just more hassle to add to the negative list.
 

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I don't carry a hand pump on any of my road bikes, only a few of the people I ride with carry a hand pump. So I am out. If the system doesn't work, why use it?
You stated 'you need to', what you meant was 'one would prefer to' on using removable core tubes. 90% of tubes do not have removable cores.
 

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You stated 'you need to', what you meant was 'one would prefer to' on using removable core tubes. 90% of tubes do not have removable cores.
Fair points - the conti's I buy have removable cores even though I don't use sealant.

tlg - that would be an option too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Not sure if you are being serious, but if you lose enough air on the road before the sealant stops the leak that you need to add air to your tube/tire, you want to use a hand pump not CO2. I know a lot of riders who do not have hand pumps and only carry CO2 inflators. It's just a consideration when using tubeless and sealant filled tubes.

Why would you go to the trouble of cutting and patching when a removable valve core solves that issue without compromising the tube in any way? If you are going to use sealant in you tubes, I guess you can do that, but it's a decent amount of extra work and time that you simply don't need to do for little or no extra cost. Cutting and patching is just more hassle to add to the negative list.
My assumption was that you'd need tubes with removable cores.
 

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My assumption was that you'd need tubes with removable cores.
I understand for you, but for others your assumption is wrong.

If u need to get special tubes, just get the tubes with slime pre-installed, that would save most of the time making the conversion. Virtually no time if you just change them the next time one gets a flat.

But then u would have slime in your tubes!
 
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