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Hey all!

I've been having some problems with numbness in my hands while riding lately, and it seemed unsolveable. One of my buddies suggested that I angle up the nose of my Arione a little bit to help "settle" me into the seat and get some weight off my hands. I tried this and it stops the numbness completely. My question is if anyone else rides "nose up", and if so, how much?

The background:
I'm a big rider (217lbs), with a lonnng torso, short arms and short legs. Very muscular throughout and an upper body like a sail. I've been riding the Arione for a while and at times felt like I was moving a bit forward on it when going hard. I've moved it a bit forward to stop that, and that has helped a bit. My seat has been traditionally very flat after coming from tri-bikes where the nose was always down.

Before going to my Scott CR1 Pro, my Giant had a great fit with no problems. I have since transferred over the Campy shifters and Arione and started to dial it in. Turns out my nose was a little up on the Giant as well. Overall, it feels pretty comfortable with no weird pains or numbness down there.

What say thee, RBR forum?

The Flash!
 

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me too

greetings

if you read the reviews on Fizik Arione and Aliante saddles (there are plenty) you will find that some folks like it nose/rear level, some nose a bit down and some with nose a bit up. So you are in good company. This setup is ok if it feels good to you.

I have both Arione Ti and Aliante Sport and in both cases the most comfortable position for me is when the rear end of each saddle is completely level flat and therefore the nose is a bit up. Less so on Arione because it more flat that Aliante but still it has a small kink in the middle.

This nose-up angle keeps my sit-bones on the rear widest part of the saddle else I tend to slide forward and very quickly get uncomfortable.

But if you get a saddle that is really flat nose to tail then you might find the best position will be nose to rear level on that particular saddle.

What I have learnt about saddles is that it is all about personal fit and your riding style and your anatomy and what works for some will hurt others.

Good luck.
 

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True but

acid_rider said:
greetings

if you read the reviews on Fizik Arione and Aliante saddles (there are plenty) you will find that some folks like it nose/rear level, some nose a bit down and some with nose a bit up. So you are in good company. This setup is ok if it feels good to you.

I have both Arione Ti and Aliante Sport and in both cases the most comfortable position for me is when the rear end of each saddle is completely level flat and therefore the nose is a bit up. Less so on Arione because it more flat that Aliante but still it has a small kink in the middle.

This nose-up angle keeps my sit-bones on the rear widest part of the saddle else I tend to slide forward and very quickly get uncomfortable.

But if you get a saddle that is really flat nose to tail then you might find the best position will be nose to rear level on that particular saddle.

What I have learnt about saddles is that it is all about personal fit and your riding style and your anatomy and what works for some will hurt others.

Good luck.

moving around changes your saddle height too.
 

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Me too

I ride a variety of saddles from Brooks Pro(2) to a San Marco Rolls(1) to a SanMarco Regal(1). I start off with the saddle level and can feel myself sliding forward putting pressure on my wrists and hands. I attach the level to my saddle and tilt the nose up until the bubble moves past center line. What it feels like that position does for me is rolls my hips back, prevents me from sliding forward, pulls my stomach in and stretches out my back a little.
 

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Lizzie will ride free
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I ride with the saddle a bit nose up. Very little changes in tilt seem to make big changes in comfort. For me, I seem to get three benefits to a little up tilt. First, it just seems to plant my sit bones in the right spot. Second, it keeps me from sliding forward. Third, it seems to keep some pressure off my hands.

Different shape saddles all seem to need a bit different angle too.

I can never get it right without riding. I get it close, and then I mess around with little adjustments on the first ride.

The worst fit advice I ever got from a shop started when the local bozo insisted I ride with my seat exactly level before I could mess around with stem length. We're only talking a couple if degrees here. I mean, how the heck could he know? Clueless.
 

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Nose up a little bit for me.

It's hard to tell what's flat since the saddles I use curve up in the back, but the nose is higher than the point on the saddle above the center of the seatpost. On seatposts with grooved clamps I try to find level and them move it forward one notch. Further up than that tends to pin the package between me and the nose of the seat.

Raising the nose keeps weight off my hands, makes it easier to ride with bent elbows, and saves me from neck and shoulder pain. I always thank the park ranger at the Bahia Honda Campground who suggested I try this when I complained of neck pain on a tour.
 

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tofurkey hunting
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for all of you that ride slightly nose up: does this put extra pressure on or create any numbness for your bits and pieces? to alleviate problems in my hands and wrists, I always try to imagine holding myself in position with my back and stomach muscles. i don't know if it makes them work any harder, but the visualization seems to help. the whole nose up issue created far worse numbness than in my hands and wrist.
 

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classiquesklassieker
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Slightly down

My saddle is slightly nose-down. The position encourages my back to keep a good straight posture, and as a result I put less weight on my hands. To each his/her own.

Note that there are so many small variables that can make a huge difference. I also use Campag, and I've gained a lot of comfort and power just by playing around with the tilt angle of the handlebar, and of the shifters. I used to have the "level at the top" setup that one sees with many of the younger riders, but now I've tilted the handlebar down a bit to be closer to the "level at the bottom of the drops" position that is more common with the older guys like Virenque, Pantani.

So it's more like this for former, less like the latter. Shorter reach, even with a little more drop.
 

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It's personal

There's no right position for the saddle - the range tends to be from the nose level (butt raised) to nose level with the butt. Some saddles don't have a raised butt, so this becomes academic. The point is to set YOUR saddle so that YOU get the right mix of comfort for your rear end and your hands, etc. What someone else does with their saddle may be very interesting, but may not apply to you in any way.
 

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n00bsauce
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I ride nose up and use the same saddle on all my bikes, mountain and road (except the tandem). I find it prevents me from slipping forward and balances me on the bike.

The shape of the saddle has a lot to do with positioning. Flat, sway back, whale tail, different shapes probably mean different saddle positions. It's an art, not a science.
 

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Depends on how saddle flexes when you sit on it

The way the Arione is built, it flexes a bit more in the mid to upper front (towards the nose) than the rear, so ever so slightly nose up can feel the same as flat, when you sit on it... depending on your weight and your @ss.

I ride mine perfectly flat, which is ever so slightly down. Too much down, and I was getting numb bits- which is very very bad. It didn't take much adjustment to make the Arione the saddle the bike guru told me I might find it to be. Same guy explained and showed me how it flexes, which is why that shop is well worth the extra $20 over mailorder.
 

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orange_julius said:
My saddle is slightly nose-down. The position encourages my back to keep a good straight posture, and as a result I put less weight on my hands. To each his/her own.

Note that there are so many small variables that can make a huge difference. I also use Campag, and I've gained a lot of comfort and power just by playing around with the tilt angle of the handlebar, and of the shifters. I used to have the "level at the top" setup that one sees with many of the younger riders, but now I've tilted the handlebar down a bit to be closer to the "level at the bottom of the drops" position that is more common with the older guys like Virenque, Pantani.

So it's more like this for former, less like the latter. Shorter reach, even with a little more drop.
Can I just butt in (no pun intended .. ok, maybe not!) and say that OJulius -- if that Cyfac in the upper picture is yours, you have one of the sweetest bikes ever to grace these pages and that I will hunt it down and take it back with me to Paris if I am ever down in Switzerland.... just kidding ... but only a little!

Philippe
 

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Also give the K-wing bars a try

I also experienced hand numbness on long rides and gave the FSA K-wing bar a try. If you like your current seat position this might be another option. I ride with my hands on the top of the bar much of the time (using very thin gloves or none at all), traditional round bars don't have enough surface area and seemed to put a lot of weight on a very small portion of my hand. Get the aluminum version since the carbon bars are very pricey.

https://www.bikyle.com/images/FsaWingBarTop.jpg
 

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classiquesklassieker
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Unfortunately ....

philippec said:
Can I just butt in (no pun intended .. ok, maybe not!) and say that OJulius -- if that Cyfac in the upper picture is yours, you have one of the sweetest bikes ever to grace these pages and that I will hunt it down and take it back with me to Paris if I am ever down in Switzerland.... just kidding ... but only a little!

Philippe
Philippe, unfortunately that is not my Cyfac. I did borrow the pictures from the Veloeuropa website though. If I remember correctly that paint job is based off one of the Cofidis riders' paint jobs from the 2000 or 2001 Tour, when they were riding Cyfacs.

I do have the same model frame though, I believe. I shall from now on be wary of Frenchmen bearing gifts ;-).

A+!
 

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Not for me..

ampastoral said:
for all of you that ride slightly nose up: does this put extra pressure on or create any numbness for your bits and pieces? to alleviate problems in my hands and wrists, I always try to imagine holding myself in position with my back and stomach muscles. i don't know if it makes them work any harder, but the visualization seems to help. the whole nose up issue created far worse numbness than in my hands and wrist.
I have my saddle a bit nose up - at least so that it appears nose-up. That is, the flat part of the nose slopes upward, but the tip of the nose is still level with or slightly below the highest part of the tail.

Anyhow, I nosed my saddle up to ease the numbness on willy and the boys. Nose up keeps me back on the sit bones, rather than sliding forward and supporting my weight on the nose of the saddle (and pinching the soft tissues.)

But folks and saddles are shaped different, so what's right for you is what works for you.
 

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My saddle is about 10* nose up. When I level it, I almost always find myself riding on the "rivet". That means I'm riding on the narrowest part of the saddle, which to me = saddle sores. With the nose up a bit, I tend to stay back more. Haven't noticed any diff in numbness to hands / arms / nether-regions.
 

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keep posture in mind

Lone Gunman said:
...tilt the nose up until the bubble moves past center line. What it feels like that position does for me is rolls my hips back, prevents me from sliding forward, pulls my stomach in and stretches out my back a little.
Interesting, and it probably works for you. But when I was fitted for a frame last year, early in the season when my posture/flexibility was poor, the fitter noticed that my hips were "rolled back" which in turn put more of a curve in my back when I reached for the handlebars. Sure enough, during the course of the season my hips slowly rolled forward, my back straightened (somewhat), and my reach stretched forward.

So my only point is, as noted by many here, fit is a very personal thing - but also keep in mind that making one adjustment (for seat comfort) may have an unexpected side effect (long term back issues).
 

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The Flash said:
Hey all!

I've been having some problems with numbness in my hands while riding lately, and it seemed unsolveable. One of my buddies suggested that I angle up the nose of my Arione a little bit to help "settle" me into the seat and get some weight off my hands. I tried this and it stops the numbness completely. My question is if anyone else rides "nose up", and if so, how much?


What say thee, RBR forum?

The Flash!
Hi Flash
Had a similar problem a couple of years - traced to handlebars that swept back slightly! It appeared when I stopped regarding 15 miles as a long day's ride (30 years off a bike does strange things to you) and started ramping up the efforts. At the time, I was riding a MTB, with the usual slightly back-swept 'straight' bar and a cyclo-cross styled clunker that I managed to equip with Ritchie "Bio-Max" bars - these are ergonomic drops with more wierd bends than Dupont Circle in DC and sweep back slightly just before they bend forward to the 'dropped' part.

Both of these gave me considerable hand problems - numbness being the worst. A swap to a Deda 215 shallow drop bar made them all go away! This bar actually sweeps forward slightly just before the dropped section, after the traditional road bar straight centre part.

Just to show I read your first post - I ride my Fizik Pave saddles level, my one Arione equipped bike, I have to have the nose section level, which puts the tail slightly up-swept. T

hose saddles that look somewhat like a hammock with a huge dip in the centre, send spasms through my unmentionable regions just looking at them and thus I offer no opinions on that type :eek:

Hope that helps

Dereck
 

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J24
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Saddle Tilt

As other here have said its what works best for you, might be nose down, up or level, the profile of the saddle whether its flat, concave, whale tail, plays a part too.

Peter White Cycles had an article on fitting saddles on his web site some time ago, basically saying that you level the part of the saddle where your pelvis/sit bones rest, not the whole saddle, this might result with the nose up, level or down.
 
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