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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a roubaix elite apex and took a few relatively short rides last weekend as well a ride to work and back. Yesterday and today I took it out for 20 mile rides and my sit bones have been just as sore as last weekend. I know theres am adjustment stage but roughly how long? I heard a few days.

Also worth noting is once I get into the ride its not that bad but I was told the seat on this is much more smooth than most rode bikes so im a bit concerned
 

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I recently bought a roubaix elite apex and took a few relatively short rides last weekend as well a ride to work and back. Yesterday and today I took it out for 20 mile rides and my sit bones have been just as sore as last weekend. I know theres am adjustment stage but roughly how long? I heard a few days.

Also worth noting is once I get into the ride its not that bad but I was told the seat on this is much more smooth than most rode bikes so im a bit concerned
Initial saddle discomfort typically takes a couple of weeks to dissipate, depending on how much you ride and obviously differences between people. If you're only one week in you have some time to go.

That said, you might want to think about these saddle comfort issues:

Saddle comfort and adjustment:

There are 7 factors in preventing saddle numbness and pain:

1) saddle adjustment - tilt angle is very important

2) sitting properly - a lot of people ride too far forward on the saddle. Your "sit bones" should be perched on the rear, wide part of the saddle

3) standing up - you should never let things go numb or get painful. At the first sign of any lack of feeling or pain, pedal standing up for a short distance and repeat as necessary to bring the feeling back and prevent further numbness

4) easing up - you want to lift your rear end off the saddle any time you are going to hit a bump or sharp edge. It's easier on your anatomy, your wheels, your tires, and the rest of your bike.

5) bike fit: in addition to saddle height and tilt, there is fore/aft adjustment, reach and drop to the bars, and cleat position.

6) tires: proper width with the right PSI for your weight and roads so you don't feel every single road imperfection.

7) saddle - there are some people who can ride most any saddle if it is properly adjusted (see #1) and there are some people who have problems with nearly any saddle. It's hard to predict which type you are. Work on 1-6 and if that doesn't help, THEN consider a new saddle.

The standard advice to cure numbness is to tip the nose down, but having discussed this topic many times, it seems that some people do not sit properly on their saddles. You need to have a saddle and saddle position that has your sit bones on the butt of the saddle. If your saddle nose is tipped down too far, it may cause you to slide forward. If it is tipped up too far, it may be causing pressure. And if you can't get things right in between these points, it may be that you are not sitting in the right spot or that the saddle doesn't fit you. In my experience, the range of saddle tilt goes from "nose level" to saddle level. Nose level means that for most saddles, the butt of the saddle is slightly elevated (this is how I ride). Saddle level means that a level placed on the saddle would have the nose and butt level, which may create a hammock effect in the middle. If your saddle is "flat" and doesn't have a raised butt relative to the nose, then the "level" concept applies to the entire length of the saddle, not just the nose. Your personal comfort has to rule on where to place things in this range. Also, fore/aft position can influence comfort - it is a trade-off between pedaling style and the how much you lean on the bars vs. sit on the saddle.
 

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Since the source of your discomfort is at your sit bones, I attribute this to acclimation.

Stands to reason you'd be "just as sore" (as last weekend) after completing two 20 mile rides in two days. Give yourself a break (like tomorrow), then incrementally ramp up your saddle time. Your body needs time not only to acclimate, but to heal.

One indication that your saddle will ultimately work for you is the statement "once I get into the ride its not that bad". If it were ill fitting, I think it would get worse, not better, as the ride progressed.

Patience... :wink5:
 

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I started riding a road bike last summer and had the same issue. The first time I went out, my ace hurt so bad I couldn't ride for another week. Even after that, the next 2 or 3 rides hurt from time to time (nothing lasting but it would while I was riding). After the first trip, I immediatly went out and bought a set of riding shorts and that did help.

Now, with more time on the saddle, I've been learning what causes what in saddle adjustments. I originally had my saddle too low and it was causing my to sit more on the nose making my crotch hurt. Then I got fit to the bike and although he took the saddle up and back quite a bit...my crotch was REALLY getting sore (and my parts were getting numb from time to time). After a 40 mile trip that is was miserable on due to crotch soreness I took matters into my own hands and decided to mess with tilt myself. I found the fitter had it actually tiled nose up. I leveled it out and actually took it nose down just slightly and it took care of the problem some 75%.

I thought I'd add that last year I rode on a Specialized Toupe and this year a Romin. The Romin had already offered better comfort but like some have said, the wider nose may be a bad fit for me. I may look into a Romin EVO...but I'll give the stock saddle more time and see how the adjustments take.

Either way...your sit bones will heal but you'll have to give it time. Don't rush things or sitting will be hell. Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the input guys. Yes I do wear riding shorts. I have specialized bibs I wear and was told the quality was good. As I stated earlier, once I'm in a ride, I tend not to notice any pain and whenever I do start to get a bit irritated, I just stand up for a bit or readjust my placement. Hoping this episode ends in a week or so becuase there's some 50+ mile routes I found that I'm wanting to try out.
 

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If you're not counting grams, why not get a Brooks Saddle?
 
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