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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In fitting up my new bike I am finding that I need a zero setback seat post. My current seat post is a Ritchey WCS with 25mm set back, and my saddle is pushed up all the way. As Ritchey doesn't make a WCS seat post in zero set back, I will be departing from the brand and looking at all available manufacturers. My question is:

Does the material really make a noticable difference in ride quality?

Should I get Ti (my bike is Ti), Carbon, or just throw another alloy post in there?

This has nothing to do with weight or bling. I strictly want to know if I can improve my ride quality by spending a few more dollars?

Thanks in advance. You have all been very helpful in my previous posts.:thumbsup:
 

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Gruntled
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Someone is bound to disagree, but I'll give you my opinion anyway. Over the last 20 years, I have owned and ridden bikes made from all four major materials: steel, aluminum, titanium, and carbon fiber, and in my humble opinion, the differences in ride quality between materials are often grossly overstated. Different frames ride differently, of course, but I think the differences are almost entirely due to geometry, tubing diameter and thickness.

If the above is true, that is, frame materials barely make a perceptible difference in ride quality, then there's no way seatpost material is going to make any difference. The seatpost just doesn't bend or flex that much. Throw an alloy post in there and forget about it.
 

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Cpark
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Jim Nazium said:
Someone is bound to disagree, but I'll give you my opinion anyway. Over the last 20 years, I have owned and ridden bikes made from all four major materials: steel, aluminum, titanium, and carbon fiber, and in my humble opinion, the differences in ride quality between materials are often grossly overstated. Different frames ride differently, of course, but I think the differences are almost entirely due to geometry, tubing diameter and thickness.

If the above is true, that is, frame materials barely make a perceptible difference in ride quality, then there's no way seatpost material is going to make any difference. The seatpost just doesn't bend or flex that much. Throw an alloy post in there and forget about it.
I'm with you on that.
Plus the tires/wheels will affect the ride quality quite a bit.
 

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I switched from a dean aluminium to a campy record carbon post on a ti frame, without switching anything else, and I could tell a difference in the ride. I know people will disagree with me but don't flame on me until you've changed only the seatpost and compared the ride. I changed nothing else on the bike and could feel a damping effect. Mine is a 27.2 and I'm guessing that the larger the seatpost diameter, the less difference there will be. If you go with carbon, make sure you don't overtighted seatpost clamp.

I had Dean Ti seatpost on a hardtail mtb a number of years ago, but felt like I was getting catipulted on seated small rollers on the top of Mount Falcon Castle trail outside Morrison Colorado, if you're farmiliar with that trail. The ti post would load up and launch me forward. I switched out to a Thomson aluminium seatpost and the catipult effect stopped. However, the thomson wasn't quite as comfy as the dean ti.
 

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+1 on that.

I have used carbon and aluminium posts on same frames I now own (Trek Madone and Time Edge). I did not notice *any* ride quality difference due to seatpost being carbon or aluminium.

On the other hand I had an aluminium Trek frame before I went to carbon frame/forks (same geometry as my Madone) and in that case I did notice a *huge* ride quality difference in favour of carbon frame+forks.

But not with seatpost! Carbon post feels the same as aluminium post inside a carbon frame/fork.

I therefore probably prefer an aluminium post to carbon post because it is harder to damage it by over-tightening the post clamp in carbon frame and it is less likely to fuse on the inside of the carbon seat-tube (but still possible so remove it and clean periodically). I also prefer aluminium stem and aluminium handlebars to carbon stem/bars because they feel more crash-worthy to me, but that is another topic.
 

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Old, slow, and fat.
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It all depends on how much of that seatpost you have sticking out of the frame. I've had the same Ti post on both road and mtn bikes. On the mtn bike, with LOTS of SP sticking out, it felt more compliant, felt like it absorbed more shock, etc. Yes, I could feel things moving around. I put that SP on my road bike with ~4-6" sticking out of the ST and it didn't feel any different than anything else I had on.

So... to all y'all that say 'it don't matter' you hafta qualify that statement with 'the way I have the bike set up.'

To the OP: ASSuMIng that you have a 'standard' road setup, chances are you won't feel much. Ride the bike 'small,' and you may feel a difference.

HTH

M
 

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The material doesn't matter, but if you are looking for a zero setback post, look no further than the thomson. Light, strong and the best clamping mechanism to be found. There are more expensive posts, but there are none better than the thomson.
 

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Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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Maybe it's placebo, but I had a cheap Al seatpost and went to EC90 and it did a world of difference for my BUTTom.

I ride a Al frame though, I think if you ride carbon, it really doesn't matter. Also, PSI in the tires also affect it, if I didn't ride at 125/130 PSI all the time, I think it would have made less of an impact.
 
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