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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I have been riding a new trek 1.2 for nearly 2 months now. I have noticed that I feel more pressure in the perineum and hardly any on the sit bones. Is this a seat issue, fit issue, or both. Thanks for any help.
 

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Burtsc said:
Hi, I have been riding a new trek 1.2 for nearly 2 months now. I have noticed that I feel more pressure in the perineum and hardly any on the sit bones. Is this a seat issue, fit issue, or both. Thanks for any help.
A couple of questions...

Have you been fitted to your bike? Purchased new, from a LBS? Also, do you get tingling/ numbness, or just feel pressure. Any other areas of pain, or even discomfort?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the quick reply. Yes I was fitted at LBS. I have not had serious pain or numbness. Just mostly soreness. My longest ride has been 15 miles, so im not sure if something else would develop on a longer ride. I also felt a little discomfort in area that only men would, I thought it might be the compression shorts. Now that I am paying attention, I notice hardly any weight on the sit bones.
I am sure the guy at the bike store would be glad to help me, but he is an hour away. If its a simple as a seat adjustment, I would like to try myself, as it may be a while before I can get the bike to him. It would kill me to leave it sitting a couple weeks .:mad2:


Thanks for your help, Burt
 

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Burtsc said:
Thanks for the quick reply. Yes I was fitted at LBS. I have not had serious pain or numbness. Just mostly soreness. My longest ride has been 15 miles, so im not sure if something else would develop on a longer ride. I also felt a little discomfort in area that only men would, I thought it might be the compression shorts. Now that I am paying attention, I notice hardly any weight on the sit bones.
I am sure the guy at the bike store would be glad to help me, but he is an hour away. If its a simple as a seat adjustment, I would like to try myself, as it may be a while before I can get the bike to him. It would kill me to leave it sitting a couple weeks .:mad2:


Thanks for your help, Burt
It's possible that it is your saddle position, but there are three adjustments, so we need to be fairly certain before making adjustments. It's also important to know the starting position, in the event you need to return to it, so keep that in mind.

First thing I'd check is if the saddle is level with the ground. Don't use your bikes top tube for reference, because many slope (even slightly). If you have one, place a level on the saddle (front to back) to check it. If not, try a straight edge similarly placed and then use a tape measure running from ground to straight edge measuring both tip and rear of saddle. If both measurements are the same, your saddle is level.
 

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"Default position"

PJ352 said:
First thing I'd check is if the saddle is level with the ground. Don't use your bikes top tube for reference, because many slope (even slightly). If you have one, place a level on the saddle (front to back) to check it. If not, try a straight edge similarly placed and then use a tape measure running from ground to straight edge measuring both tip and rear of saddle. If both measurements are the same, your saddle is level.
I tend to question what is considered the default position of saddles. I thought the most objective reference would be the clamp section of seat rail's angle relative to the ground/horizontal plane.

I think this because: 1) The engineering would have to revolve around a certain reference - be odd for a company to say, "lets design with a default position 2-3 degrees". 2) Many saddles aren't made flat, and were intended to have dropping noses and high rears, low spots, etc that were to offer ideal performance that wasn't necessarily when all things were set level. 3) It's easy to pinpoint with an angle-marked seatpost (take 90 minus the ST angle for a horizontal setting)

That being said (not to build up into any heated argument), OP: I'd also suggest a re-approach your self-fine-fitting with the rails lining up with a level, horizontal plane. Even if seemingly sloped, you shouldn't have sliding issues - or at least my experience I haven't.
 

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It can depend on the saddle design too, for instance Selle Anatomica recommends starting with the nose 1/8" high. Regardless of how you arrive at it, if you're sliding forward because your saddle is tilted too far forward, you'll likely wind up with perineal pressure
 

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Ventruck said:
I tend to question what is considered the default position of saddles. I thought the most objective reference would be the clamp section of seat rail's angle relative to the ground/horizontal plane.

I think this because: 1) The engineering would have to revolve around a certain reference - be odd for a company to say, "lets design with a default position 2-3 degrees". 2) Many saddles aren't made flat, and were intended to have dropping noses and high rears, low spots, etc that were to offer ideal performance that wasn't necessarily when all things were set level. 3) It's easy to pinpoint with an angle-marked seatpost (take 90 minus the ST angle for a horizontal setting)

That being said (not to build up into any heated argument), OP: I'd also suggest a re-approach your self-fine-fitting with the rails lining up with a level, horizontal plane. Even if seemingly sloped, you shouldn't have sliding issues - or at least my experience I haven't.
You're rushing to judgement re: my inquiring on saddle position. I want to know the OP's current position, but didn't tell him to change it. And while it's obvious that saddles are (to an extent) shaped differently, you can check it as I described if you account for those contours in placing the level or straight edge. I do it all the time.

I do disagree on the importance you place on the saddle rails. IMO they're simply irrelevant to this topic. I also disagree that a sloped saddle won't have the tendency to shift a riders weight forward - assuming the saddle tilts that way.
 

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dysfunction said:
It can depend on the saddle design too, for instance Selle Anatomica recommends starting with the nose 1/8" high. Regardless of how you arrive at it, if you're sliding forward because your saddle is tilted too far forward, you'll likely wind up with perineal pressure
Absolutely. It may also be necessary to shift the saddle rearward slightly (not tilt, but aft) as well, which shifts rider weight rearward. This is partly why I asked the OP about other numbness/ discomfort. I suspected excessive frontal weight, and that could still be the case.
 

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Burtsc said:
Hey, thanks again for the help. The best I can tell the seat is level from front to back.
Burt
If you're open to trying a couple of saddle adjustments, one would be to tilt the front of the saddle slightly up (keyword, slightly). The other would be to move the saddle rearward 5mm's and down about 2mm's. the goal is to shift your weight rearward (a little) so that you're sit bones support your weight, like they should.

If (for whatever reason) this doesn't work, you could always move things back, but if you're not comfortable with the adjustments, hold off and visit your LBS for assistance. And it's always possible that the saddle isn't to your liking.
 

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dysfunction said:
It can depend on the saddle design too, for instance Selle Anatomica recommends starting with the nose 1/8" high. Regardless of how you arrive at it, if you're sliding forward because your saddle is tilted too far forward, you'll likely wind up with perineal pressure
The correct way to ensure the starting point is to use a straight edge on the center of the seat to the stem top. Measure the distance with a tape and you will be able to duplicate it. Ensure that the straight edge is resting easy on both the front center and back center of the seat (it should be light weight like a wooden yard stick (make sure it is straight). You must also mark the current height of your seatpost and the fore and aft position of the seat before doing anything.
 

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SwiftSolo said:
The correct way to ensure the starting point is to use a straight edge on the center of the seat to the stem top. Measure the distance with a tape and you will be able to duplicate it. Ensure that the straight edge is resting easy on both the front center and back center of the seat (it should be light weight like a wooden yard stick (make sure it is straight). You must also mark the current height of your seatpost and the fore and aft position of the seat before doing anything.
This is the method I use for tilt, and it works well. I use a metal straight edge and measure ground to straight edge at both saddle tip and stem, then compare differences. 5-7mm's is about all the rise I need for a comfortable tilt, but others may prefer more or less.

For saddle height, I prefer to measure then note it, because marking the post isn't reliable if you ever have to drop the height. Agree on marking fore/ aft as well.
 

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I prefer to measure the saddle position fore/aft relative to the centerline of the BB too, I've never had good luck with any kind of on-bike markings. But a plumb-bob lives in my toolbox so it's always handy. Once everything is set to my liking I write it all down, although these days I have spreadsheets for recording fit per bike.
 

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dysfunction said:
I prefer to measure the saddle position fore/aft relative to the centerline of the BB too, I've never had good luck with any kind of on-bike markings. But a plumb-bob lives in my toolbox so it's always handy. Once everything is set to my liking I write it all down, although these days I have spreadsheets for recording fit per bike.
That'll work as well, as long as you don't change saddles. For whatever reason, once I check KOPS +/- the position is indelibly etched in my brain (-1cm), so no need to mark the rails as a reminder. I do mark them prior to removing the saddle, because it's easier to reposition at the mark than to redo KOPS.

FWIW, I've had my bikes set up the same for long enough now that if something were to happen to them I'd be able to duplicate the fit with minimal effort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks again for all the great advice. I will have a little time on Monday to tinker with it a bit. If all fails, I will take it to my LBS. Heck im getting in the mood for clipless pedals anyway.
 

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Burtsc said:
Thanks again for all the great advice. I will have a little time on Monday to tinker with it a bit. If all fails, I will take it to my LBS. Heck im getting in the mood for clipless pedals anyway.
Good attitude! And in the process you might just learn a few things! :thumbsup:

Post updates if you get a chance.
 
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