Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,158 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tried out a Selle SMP Evolution today. Interesting saddle. I think it might work for me, but I would like a little more padding.

My question: The three saddles in the "custom padding" level: Evolution, Stratos, Glider (where the heck do they come up with these names, anyway) obviously have different widths, but is the padding depth also different across these three models? Or do you have to go up to the Pro or Plus to get more padding (both of which would be too wide for me).

TIA
 

· Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
I believe the padding level is the only difference between those models. I have a composite on both of my bikes. I tell those who ask that it's the only saddle I've every tried that seems grateful to have my butt parked on it. But I almost never ride more than 50 miles at a time. I tried the Evolution and did not find it that much more comfortable than the composite, although it may pass the century test must better. In my experience, the composite is SMP's best saddle because there is no padding to smooth over that amazing profile. If it suits you, you'll never consider going back. Note: I prefer the older models without the stitching on the side, which tends to wear out your expensive bibs.
 

· Shut up legs!
Joined
·
1,331 Posts
I just bought a Glider today. I will try it out on my next ride. But by logic, it should be pretty comfortable especially when riding in the drops when the soft tissue/artery area of the lower scrotum gets squished.

I am thinking with the lack of pressure in the sensitive area, it will also help keep the legs fresh. I find that when the crotch is under pressure, the legs get tired easier as if it's not getting enough blood.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,158 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Let us know how it goes.

I borrowed an Evolution over the week, but did not like it. After 90 minutes lots of pain in my sitbones, radiating down my legs. And after two days abrasion sores where I never had them before.

Theoretically, these saddles should be da bomb. But this experience has not impressed me. Would more padding and a wider saddle make a difference? Should I spend $250 to find out? I dunno.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Those who have borrowed my Composite either really like, or really don't. But consider the possibility that, since the SMP is forcing the rider to rest their weight in places to which they might not be accustomed, the first experience might be like riding for the first time. I bought my saddle by mistake, but decided to try it rather than return it immediately. It took +/-150 miles to get it adjusted right. This is because I tended to try adjustments that seemed right for a more conventional saddle.

I find that the tilt adjustment is much more sensitive than with conventional saddles, and I will notice if the saddle slips even a couple of millimeters off the good position. For this reason, a ratcheting type seatpost might not be ideal. SMP's are sloping saddles. One of their best features is the raised rear end which provides a 'backboard' to push against. But this means that, for me anyway, the saddle appears to slope downward compared to the position of standard saddles.

There are two standard widths, and each rider will have to test for size, although I believe the wider design is intended for the more 'casual' rider.

The SMP's are on the heavy side, so definitely not for those who put weight over comfort.

Whenever I ride a standard saddle these days, I immediately feel that my weight is resting on the soft tissue between my legs rather than the gluteus muscle tissue next to it as with the SMP. It's a horrible feeling, and I wonder how riders spend hours in that position.

BTW, the SMP really shines when I'm in the drops, so I can imagine that it might suit TT and triathlon riders very well.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I've been riding a Selle SMP Pro on my Cervelo P2C for the last two months, and have had absolutely no numbness or tinglies. However, it has taken forever for my sit bones to adjust.

At first I thought it was because I hadn't been using my sit bones much on the narrow stock seat that came on the P2C, but then I'd feel fine on my other bike with a Specialized Alias on it.

I finally looked at those rear SMP profile shots that show padding and width, and found that even though the Pro is "wider" than the Glider for instance, the profile and padding slope way off very quickly, making the Glider have more real usable width. If my sit bones are actually that wide, then I was sitting on the sloped portion with almost no padding. However, the Glider is also has a more narrow and less padded nose. I'm going to order one and see if it helps...
 

· Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
Angle Really Helps

I found that I needed a wider SMP than my previous saddle. Once I figured that out, I needed to set the saddle with the nose down a bit. Part of it is the optics of the saddle profile as it seems to me hard to determine what is level. And using a level itself only helps a little. I think when one uses a level, and it is "nose down" about 1/4 inch from horizontal, that's really about level on the saddle as you sit on it. Having it tail down puts too much weight on my sit bones. You really settle into the trough, not on the tail of the saddle.

All said and done, I love it.
 

· Looking for my Amish Love
Joined
·
948 Posts
kdub said:
I wonder why no pros use the SMP seat or seats with a hole in the center. Considering they spend hours and hours on the bike, it would be a reasonable choice.
There are two continental teams that use the SMP saddles. It comes down to sponsorship dollars. Fizik & Selle Italia can put up a lot of money to a protour team & get them to use their saddles. Look at CSC, they are on the new ProLogo saddles. I bet they got paid a pretty penny to ride those.

Also, there are pros who do use seats with a cut-out. Gilbert rides an SLR Gel Flow, Rebellin uses an SLR Carbon Flow, Chavannel uses a Pro-Link Flow, just to name a few.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Andrea138 said:
I've been wanting to try one of these, but they are a bit expensive. Anyone know a place with a good return policy that sells them?
You might try nonstopciclismo.com , they are an ebay dealer, but the last time I was in their shop I noticed some SMP's marked 'demo'.

SMP's have a break-in period. I've got 1000 miles on my second composite, and it still not quite as pliable as my first. Also, the rider will require a break-in period, as you slowly develop a "thicker skin" where you contact the saddle.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top