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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to (have to) replace my BB cups (the finish is popping off because of corrosion underneath, probably from sweat getting beneath the finish [Rant On]Seriously guys, this is your top-of-the-line group, with a couple of measly cups going for 40 bucks a pop. For that kind of money, you might expect the finish to last more than a year, just like any other $5-set of cups[Rant off]).

Anyhow, so I thought I might as well service the BB bearings while I am at it.

I have two questions:
  • What is the best way to clean the bearings? Just wipe them off with a dry cloth, use chain cleaner, some other solvent? Use a brush?
  • What lubricant should I use for re-lubing? Grease? Which one? Some oil instead of grease (I seem to recall Campy saying that you can lube the CULT bearings with oil rather than grease)?
Thanks for any advice!
 

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So the black anodize suffered from corrosion? You might consider washing the bike occasionally and/or applying some WD-40 to the area. Can't hurt. The cups and all other parts are a lot cheaper from the UK. When I order from Ribble or Shiney bikes, I stock up on cheap chains, tires, cables and whatever else I might need for the next couple of years.

The SR bearings only need oil. I'd use something heavy like 75W/90 synthetic gear lube.

Cleaning the bearings requires flushing them. There are no seals on the inside. Using some mineral spirits and a brush might work OK, but a spray would be better. WD-40 or similar will work. A product like brake parts degreaser in a spray can is hard on the seals. I tried it once and it curdled the seals, but they returned to normal when the solvent evaporated.
 

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C-40 said:
Cleaning the bearings requires flushing them. There are no seals on the inside. Using some mineral spirits and a brush might work OK, but a spray would be better. WD-40 or similar will work. A product like brake parts degreaser in a spray can is hard on the seals. I tried it once and it curdled the seals, but they returned to normal when the solvent evaporated.
Your comments interest me because I've been thinking of doing the same thing. My question, however, goes a little further. Should I pull the bearings to accomplish this or is it sufficient to do this while the bearings are attached to the joints on the crank arms?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
C-40 said:
So the black anodize suffered from corrosion?
Yep... It's only on the left cup, though, but then the right one is protected from sweat drippings by the chainrings/spider.

C-40 said:
You might consider washing the bike occasionally and/or applying some WD-40 to the area. Can't hurt.
Hey, my bike is one of the cleanest in the club... :rolleyes: But applying some protection might be a good idea. On the other hand, like I said, I don't believe any of the Shimano or SRAM counterparts, even at the very bottom of the lineups, need that kind of babying. But, I may have just received a pair from a bad batch.

And, yes, I usually order my Campy stuff from ShinyBikes. Good people.

C-40 said:
The SR bearings only need oil. I'd use something heavy like 75W/90 synthetic gear lube.

Cleaning the bearings requires flushing them. There are no seals on the inside. Using some mineral spirits and a brush might work OK, but a spray would be better. WD-40 or similar will work. A product like brake parts degreaser in a spray can is hard on the seals. I tried it once and it curdled the seals, but they returned to normal when the solvent evaporated.
Thanks very much, that helps!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
amicus said:
Your comments interest me because I've been thinking of doing the same thing. My question, however, goes a little further. Should I pull the bearings to accomplish this or is it sufficient to do this while the bearings are attached to the joints on the crank arms?
You don't want to pull the bearings. You would need the proper tools to do this in the first place, and at the very least the removal procedure would put unnecessary strain on the bearings. You may even end up having to replace the bearings with new ones after removing the old ones, due to damage they might sustain in the procedure. Plus, my motto is, don't fix it if it ain't broken, and don't remove/reinstall anything unless you have to.
 
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