Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Il faut d'abord, durer.
Joined
·
333 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was planning on buying a spinner for home, but looks like budget won't allow. So, I'm now considering a trainer, but have several questions as I've never used one.

1 - Do you change resistance by changing gears on your bike, or through the unit while leaving the bike in the same gear?

2 - What's better? Rim drive, tire drive, fluid or magnetic?

3 - Is standing advisable with your bike clamped in?

Thanks a lot.
 

·
nothing
Joined
·
120 Posts
Gargamel said:
1 - Do you change resistance by changing gears on your bike, or through the unit while leaving the bike in the same gear?
You can change resistance by shifting gears on your bike. Some trainers have progressive resistance - basically, the faster you pedal, the more resistance the trainer produces. Other trainers have a remote that connects to the handlebars for adjusting resistance.
Gargamel said:
3 - Is standing advisable with your bike clamped in?
You can stand and really hammer with no trouble.
I've never used anything but tire drive fluid trainers, so I can't help you with your second question.
 

·
Scary Teddy Bear
Joined
·
14,791 Posts
Gargamel said:
I was planning on buying a spinner for home, but looks like budget won't allow. So, I'm now considering a trainer, but have several questions as I've never used one.

1 - Do you change resistance by changing gears on your bike, or through the unit while leaving the bike in the same gear?

2 - What's better? Rim drive, tire drive, fluid or magnetic?

3 - Is standing advisable with your bike clamped in?

Thanks a lot.

Being in Minnesota, Trainers are a necessary evil. I had a magnetic trainer and hated it, the resistance wasn't progressive and it was louder than anything. I could have the TV on, and be outside, and I could still hear it. Now, I recently purchased a Kurt Kinetic Fluid trainer and I love it, progressive resistance, and QUIET. I've never used a rim drive, only tire drive, so I can't speak to them. You increase your resistance by changing gears on your bike, as you increase your RPM's the resistance goes up....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
you may want to consider rollers too - can be as good of a workout as a trainer and it's waaay better for your cycling form as you're actually riding - and if you thrash, bob your head around, move your upper body, rock back and forth etc, you will crash.

rollers 'be the best of both worlds - good workout (pending you get some form of resistance) and will do wonders for your form.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Definately get some rollers because riding only a trainer will make you go insane! My favorite part about rollers is:
1.) riding without hands and feeling super cool
2.) spinning in my 53x11 and watching the speedometer read 40mph. It's funny how fast you can go if you don't need to push air around! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Or if you are willing to spend some $$, you can get a virtual trainer. This way you can have a video game or (for a Tacx unit) Real Life Video and have the resistance altered by the computer to match what you are seeing on the computer screen. You can compete against other people or previous rides. I have a Tacx Fortius. It actually simulates a downhill by spinning your rear wheel so it feels more realistic. However I have found this to be kind of flaky, at least on my unit. I have found the Real Life Video (real video on DVD of actual rides around the world) to be the most interesting. Most good units will be tire drive.

I can stand with my bike in the trainer, but of course it doesn't feel realistic because the bike can't move side to side, but I have had no problems so far.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top