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I read several methods, still confused...Is this correct?
Put 1 thin layer of glue on rim and 1 thin layer on tire and let dry, then 1 thin layer on rim and 1 thin layer on tire and let dry? Then final coat on rim and tire, then install?
 

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that method has worked well for me, but wait till the third layer is at least tacky before you combine the tire and rim.
 

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Final coat

I think you can do the final (third) coat just on the rim, so it's easier to work with the tire. Otherwise if you put a third coat on the tire and not allow it to fully dry you'll have the semi tacky glue from the tire getting all over everything.
 

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Once again, tubulars attract the anal-retentive cyclists. Seriously, just put a layer of glue down, let it dry just a bit, and put on the friggin' tire. You ain't painting the Mona Lisa here!
 

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Dave_Stohler said:
Once again, tubulars attract the anal-retentive cyclists. Seriously, just put a layer of glue down, let it dry just a bit, and put on the friggin' tire. You ain't painting the Mona Lisa here!
Having ridden tubulars for many years, I gotta agree with Dave here. Also keep in mind that unlike a clincher (which wants to push itself off the rim the more you pump it up), a tubular tightens against the rim more and more with increasing pressure. Most tubulars I see now are way overglued. But I guess with cell phones in everyone's pocket it's not a big deal if you can't get a flat one off the rim. :D
 

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I always wonder what people do when they flat on the road---- do they just install a pre-glued tire and ride off into the sunset (and keep riding). Or do they ride it home, remove it, and reglue the spare.

I want to know because I have never actually flatted on a tubular--- or perhaps the Tufo sealant really does its job.

---but what if?
 

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filtersweep said:
I always wonder what people do when they flat on the road---- do they just install a pre-glued tire and ride off into the sunset (and keep riding). Or do they ride it home, remove it, and reglue the spare.

I want to know because I have never actually flatted on a tubular--- or perhaps the Tufo sealant really does its job.

---but what if?
Here's how it worked back in the day: you glued your tire to the rim tight enough so it wouldn't roll off in a fast turn, but not so tight that you couldn't muscle it off with your bare hands if it flats. Your spare was an old tubular with some glue still left on the base tape. The glue on the spare and the glue on the rim gave you enough of a contact-cement type bond to continue the ride, with some caution around fast, tight turns. If you had another flat far from home, a fellow rider gave you their spare tubular. If your second flat was within 5 miles or so of home, you'd ride the flat on in. FWIW, a good rider could change a tubular flat and pump the spare in less than 2 minutes.

Two things were the key: as mentioned, you had to get the bond just right—not breakable by a high-speed turn, but not so tight you couldn't get the flat tire off. (Some people left two non-adjacent spaces between spokes unglued to get a good start on the removal process.) The other thing that made this work is the fact that road glue (unlike track glue) doesn't dry for a long time. So even after months of no flat, the spare would still stick to the rim to complete a ride or even a road race without hairy descents.
 

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I know that much--- and you implied an answer-- in that through using an old tire, it is removed and replaced with a properly glued new tire.

My strategy is to milk out as much mileage as possible, and my rear is squaring off. I should probably replace it pro-actively-- but assuming I change it on the road, do I really need to reglue it later?

wim said:
Here's how it worked back in the day: you glued your tire to the rim tight enough so it wouldn't roll off in a fast turn, but not so tight that you couldn't muscle it off with your bare hands if it flats. Your spare was an old tubular with some glue still left on the base tape. The glue on the spare and the glue on the rim gave you enough of a contact-cement type bond to continue the ride, with some caution around fast, tight turns. If you had another flat far from home, a fellow rider gave you their spare tubular. If your second flat was within 5 miles or so of home, you'd ride the flat on in. FWIW, a good rider could change a tubular flat and pump the spare in less than 2 minutes.

Two things were the key: as mentioned, you had to get the bond just right—not breakable by a high-speed turn, but not so tight you couldn't get the flat tire off. (Some people left two non-adjacent spaces between spokes unglued to get a good start on the removal process.) The other thing that made this work is the fact that road glue (unlike track glue) doesn't dry for a long time. So even after months of no flat, the spare would still stick to the rim to complete a ride or even a road race without hairy descents.
 

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filtersweep said:
I know that much--- and you implied an answer-- in that through using an old tire, it is removed and replaced with a properly glued new tire.

My strategy is to milk out as much mileage as possible, and my rear is squaring off. I should probably replace it pro-actively-- but assuming I change it on the road, do I really need to reglue it later?
Yes, always reglue after you get home. Of course, all my spares were very old, very worn and suffered from having been strapped under the saddle for years. So I always removed them once back home and put on a new or newer tubular.
 

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I agree that too much glue isn't a good thing. I still curse the LBS wrench who superglued my first tire with what must have been 4-5 tubes of glue. My fingers are still sore and cramping from peeling off the tire, then removing the huge chunks of glue from the rim. Some wonder that the tire was out of round. I've been much happier since
I glued the tires myself.
 

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Too much glue issue

eugkim said:
I agree that too much glue isn't a good thing. I still curse the LBS wrench who superglued my first tire with what must have been 4-5 tubes of glue.
In really hot weather, or under heavy braking on long descents, too much glue can be a real problem because if it softens due to the heat, the tire will roll off much more easily than if you have a (reasonable) thin glue layer. Been there, done that.
 

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If you roll a tire in a very hard turn, you know that you didn't use enough glue. If you roll a tire after a pedal strike, and the bike jumps and hits the ground at a 45 degree angle, you know that it's always smart to use lots of glue on crit wheels.
I've never had to change a tubie on the road because I only use them in race situations. When I do have to change them at home, it sometimes takes me 10 to 15 minutes to get that sucker off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
gluleing

MR_GRUMPY said:
If you roll a tire in a very hard turn, you know that you didn't use enough glue. If you roll a tire after a pedal strike, and the bike jumps and hits the ground at a 45 degree angle, you know that it's always smart to use lots of glue on crit wheels.
I've never had to change a tubie on the road because I only use them in race situations. When I do have to change them at home, it sometimes takes me 10 to 15 minutes to get that sucker off.
But if one's concern is rolling tire (theoretical or real), then why not use clinchers for racing? Also, I don't think 100 grams per wheel would make a difference in a race. Am I wrong?
 

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Balancing act.

steel515 said:
But if one's concern is rolling tire (theoretical or real), then why not use clinchers for racing? Also, I don't think 100 grams per wheel would make a difference in a race. Am I wrong?
Depends on what and where you're racing. There's a real danger of rolling a tire in a crit because you're going through a lot of turns at insane speeds. But as Grumpy pointed out, just glue your crit tires down as tight as you can—you're not going to change a tire during a crit ever, only a whole wheel if you have a flat.

In a road race, the only real danger of rolling a tubular is if there are long, curvy, high-speed descents with lots of hard braking. Under those circumstances, I'd rather be on clinchers myself. But others will feel safer with tubulars, correctly pointing out that tubulars tend to stay on the rim if they flat, even at high speeds.

The 100 gram weight penalty? Unless racing is a constant yo-yo of decelerations and accelerations for you, forget it if on flat ground. Put a bike in a repair stand and spin up the rear wheel. Then put a +100 grams rear wheel into the frame and spin it up. If you can feel that extra 100 grams, it's in your head. Long and hard climbs is another matter—200 grams added to your bike is 200 grams you have to lift up a certain number of vertical feet. Of course, the 200 grams will help you go downhill again, so it wasn't all in vain.
 

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I was planning on racing my Hed Stingers in a crit in a couple weeks that I glued with Tufo tape. Should I be concerned about rolling a tire? It seems that I'd be better served by getting some clincher race wheels....

Tim
 

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takl23 said:
I was planning on racing my Hed Stingers in a crit in a couple weeks that I glued with Tufo tape. Should I be concerned about rolling a tire? It seems that I'd be better served by getting some clincher race wheels....

Tim


All I use is the tape and I've never lost a tire on any of my wheels. I've also never had a customer lose a tire under any circumstance.

Tape = good stuff.
 

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The downside of tape is that it is very hard to repair a tire after it's been taped.
Tape is always better than a minimal glue job, but not as good as a "heavy duty" glue job.
 

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Thanks for the replies guys! I'm going to race them tonight in our weekly training race. Speeds top out at about 38mph so we'll see how it goes!

Tim
 
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