Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, all. I just got into cycling last May so I bought a cheapo (I know, here we go again) Giant TCX-3 that unfortunately has the Shimano 2300 gruppo with a FSA Omega triple crank.

I say unfortunately because I ride a lot and I ride pretty hard so I'm already regretting going cheap.

The problem is, I've never got the front shifting to work properly for long since I've had the bike.

First, terrible shifting performance. I could never get it from the middle to small chainring unless I literally jerked up on the pedals. If the mechanic(s) fixes that, then it seems to take 3 or 4 seconds to get from the small chainring to the middle. They can never seem to get the balance right. Its either the first problem, or the second, depending on how they adjust it.

And more annoyingly than that, it just won't stay in tune. I get chainrub most of the time, which seems especially bad for 500-1000km's after I get new cables.

When I first got the bike, I couldn't use the lowest 2 or 3 gears without a ton of noise. It eventually went away but in mid February I replaced the chain and cassette and I seem to have a different and more persistent problem now. I cant use the tallest three gears in the middle or big chainring without terrible grinding chainrub.

It's been over 500km now and it won't go away. The mechanics adjust it and it comes back 10 to 30km's later. This is my main complaint. I CAN'T FINISH A RIDE WITHOUT GETTING NOISY CHAINRUB! :mad2:

I know how to avoid cross-chaining so it's not that.

Is it normal for a front derailleur and cables to be so difficult to keep adjusted or to take so long to break in after new cables?

Do I have a faulty derailleur or is 2300 just cheap crap that won't stay adjusted? Are the mechanics not doing something right? Maybe the chain line isnt correct?

Any suggestions? Many thanks to anyone who has the patience to read and reply to my long-winded rant.
 

·
Burnum Upus Quadricepus
Joined
·
2,017 Posts
I know how to avoid cross-chaining so it's not that.
But do you know how to trim?

I've never used 2300, but in my experience with other Shimano triples--including Sora 3300 and 3400--the front shifter has five positions: small, small trim, middle, middle trim, and big.

The trim positions are used to eliminate noise when in the outer cogs--sort of half-shifts to move the FD out of the way of the chain without actually shifting to the next ring. Some of what I read in your post leads me to believe that either you are not using the trim positions properly, or your mechanic is not paying attention to trim positions when he's adjusting the shifting. (Or both.)

I've had experience with mechanics who don't, won't, or can't properly set-up a triple. I heard from them variations of "Sora is supposed to shift like crap". It's not, and I'm sure 2300 isn't either. Shimano wants you to be happy with its products.

Learn how to set up and tune your FD yourself. After some practice, I can set up a triple better than any mechanic who has ever worked on my bikes.

I prefer the Shimano Techdocs since they also include troubleshooting tips, which others--including Park Tool--do not.

FD: http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/t...01/SI-5LZ0A-001-ENG_v1_m56577569830673815.pdf

Levers: http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/t...01/SI-5LZ0A-001-ENG_v1_m56577569830673815.pdf

In such a long-standing and frustrating situation, I'd buy a couple of new cables and cable ends. You'll likely sacrifice at least one cable to the learning curve. Consider it tuition in the School of Hard Knocks. A bare stainless cable should be about five bucks.

Then start right from scratch verifying that the FD is mounted properly on the frame, and aligned properly to the chainrings. You won't have the "pro-set alignment block" but can do without by using only your hands or a pencil to hold the FD in the outermost position, and a penny to judge tooth clearance.

BTW, you don't need a workstand. I got by for many years by simply turning the bike over. I had to put it on three blocks of some sort (I use books) under the levers and the back of the saddle so that the bike doesn't rest on the stem clamp or the saddle nose.

After you first install the new cable, play with shifting by pulling on the cable with your hand so you can learn just what the lever and its five click positions do for you. Then start with adjusting the shifting.

I'm not the brightest bulb in the pack, so it took me a a couple of afternoons and a couple of cables to learn how the whole thing works, and how to tune and fine-tune it. These days, my triples (I have two) shift flawlessly and run quietly from day one on new cables for thousands of miles until the next cable change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,486 Posts
What the above poster said was completely true. A bigger problem is that shimano makes their stuff to work as a system. IE chain, chainrings, and cassette cogs are designed with ramps and pins to help with shifting. Up front these help a ton, and alot of cheapo rings have no ramps or pins to help lift and lower the chain during shifting.

Plus, in many years, the two things that seem to be the hardest for people to learn how to do is true wheels and set up front shifters. Honestly ive never understood why shimano, when they first introduced STI, didnt just put 8 indents on each side. It would have made triming so much easier.

Bill
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top