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I am replacing the crankset on my Lynsky; going from an FSA Omega to a Shimano 105 crankset. When I removed the FSA MegaExo BB, I noticed there was teflon tape on the threads.

Is this a recommended procedure when installing bottom brackets in titanium frames? I had not seen it before, and I'm wondering if I should do this when installing the new Shimano bottom bracket. If not, is a liberal coating of Phil Wood grease on the threads sufficient?

Thanks

G
 

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Get me to In&Out
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I agree that anti-seize is the way to go. The copper stuff is pretty pricey from Finish Line, but it has never failed me. A few dollars up front is worth the hassle you will save yourself if you skip it.
 

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chamois creme addict
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I have installed BBs in Ti frames with liberal usage of Phil's grease and never had a problem, and I live and ride in a very wet climate.

Park Tool also makes an anti-seize, might be cheaper than Finish Line.
 

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A wheelist
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Long-time Ti frames owner here. Even though I have Permatex Anti-Sieze (buy that as it will be cheaper from your local auto parts store than any bike-related re-packaged product) I used regular grease on my last BB install into my Ti frame. I just pulled it out after two years and it came out just fine.
 

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I went to Permatex years ago when the aluminum stem (the old threaded kind) got stuck in my wife's Litespeed. At one point, I was convinced that the stem was never coming out. Since then, I use it for the BB, head set and pedals. I'm sure grease would work just fine as well, but I bet Permatex has a longer life. Use one ot the other generously. I don't think titanium and aluminum get along real well. Or maybe they get along too well.
 

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Steaming piles of opinion
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My Litespeed came from the shop with teflon tape; when I removed it the following year for a crank swap, it came out fine. Maybe a little too easy, honestly. I replaced it the same way, did fine for three years until the BB crapped out (it was a cheap FSA) When I replaced it, I just used good ol' Park grease. Five seasons later, I pulled it for another swaparound - and it was fine.

Don't overthink it. Unless you are putting in Ti cups, just about anything will be fine. Anti-seize is probably 'right', but bikes don't see the sort of temperature or electrolytic action that makes it all that necessary.
 

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I am replacing the crankset on my Lynsky; going from an FSA Omega to a Shimano 105 crankset. When I removed the FSA MegaExo BB, I noticed there was teflon tape on the threads.

Is this a recommended procedure when installing bottom brackets in titanium frames? I had not seen it before, and I'm wondering if I should do this when installing the new Shimano bottom bracket. If not, is a liberal coating of Phil Wood grease on the threads sufficient?
There are 4 schools of thought: grease, anti-seize, thread lock compound, teflon tape. All have their proponents and they all work for some people. When I got my Litespeed many years ago it came with the typical messy copper anti-seize. I don't remember why but I contacted Litesped for their advice - my bike has some Ti bolts, a Ti stem and seat post, and various other aluminum and steel bolts and screws. Litespeed recommended grease. The bike now has about 140,000 miles on it and I've only ever used grease. No issues. None.
 

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When I replaced the FSA BB and crank on my Lynskey, the BB had some green thread lock on it from the factor. It was a bear to remove. I used grease because that's what was available and based on experience I was fine with using grease.

In the past when I worked in a shop in S. Florida, we did use Teflon tape and grease on all the BB we replaced, fixed, etc.
 

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Theoretically, it depends on what you one's trying to achieve. The purpose of Teflon tape is to help one properly tighten the thread, just like in plumbing applicattions. The purpose of anti-seize if to make sure you will be able to undo the thread when (if) it should become necessary. I know people who make a point of using both on BB treads, claiming that this is the right way to go about it. But to me it looks like an overkill. I used ordinary Moly grease alone and it worked just fine.
 
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