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When people say they upgraded their shimano components from 2300, to Sora, to 105, dura ace, etc, etc -- is that more about performance (they want lighter materials to reduce weight, or a shifter/derailleur that shifts faster/smoother) or for durability (their component broke/became dysfunctional)?

I'm considering buying a new Trek 1.1, and my only concern is having to replace the 2300 level derailleurs and brifters -- NOT for weight/performance reasons, but only in the event they break. Is this something to be concerned about, or should these components if properly used, hold up well over time?

My only reference point is my original road bike, a 1984 trek 560, with downtube friction shifters/components (suntour), which are still good to this day. Can I expect the 2300 components to last a while? I don't care about the weight, or performance level of the 2300 components -- I'm happy with the level they are (not looking to get into serious road racing).

Also, how frequently do brifters need to be tuned up? The LBS I'd buy from offers free tune-ups for life :)
 

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I've got a few bits of Sora (shifters) and Tiagra (hubs, derailleurs) and they've all held up fine. Functionally, the drivetrain parts run through the indexing exactly as they should--can't ask for more at the price point. Same for 105 (shifters/derailleurs).

I only upgraded my lower-end Shimano components for weight or because the shifting mechanisms are slightly different (Sora has/had buttons), or to get more speeds. Durability has absolutely not been a factor with lower-end Shimano components, for me at least.
 
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In my experience, Shimano stuff lasts forever.

I'm using a rear deraillieur that came on my bike when I bought in it 2001. I only swapped out the front shifters and front derailleur because I went from 9-speed Ultegra to 10-speed (the rear D doesn't know the difference).

I've been very impressed with the quality and durability. And once you get the stuff dialed in, forget it ... It has been years since I've fooled with adjustments of any kind.

I think this is one reason why Shimano keeps updating components and halting production of earlier incarnations. If they didn't, there'd be no reason to buy more Shimano.
 

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I am still using the original Sora drive train on my 2000 Giant OCR2. Just had a tuneup down and everything works fine.
 

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Beetpull DeLite
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I've had two Shimano mt. bike thumb shifters fail (an Acera and an Alivio) and one Tiagra STI lever crap out on me. The former two were old and beat up, the Tiagra lever not so much. It was replaced under warranty through the dealer, no problem. The replacement was fine and still is.
 

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I seem to burn up chains quicker than I hear other people with different brands do.....but other than that I've never had anything Shimano just wear out and die.

To directly answer your question.....when you hear about people 'upgrading' it has nothing to do with the old stuff dying. It often has little to do with performance either but that's a whole other subject.
 

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The Cube
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not knowing much about the bont wheels, or 2300 parts, my concern on this bike would first and foremost be the crankset. My first roadbike had a FSA Gossamer which was clicky, creaky, rapidly ring wearing, and generally soft feeling (compared to its 6700 replacement) and overall junky, and my bike shop said this was not uncommon, in their experience.

The 1.1 appears to have an FSA that is even a step down from the Gossamer. Like I said, I don't have personal experience with any of the parts on this bike, but based on the other respondents' (new word?) experiences and my own, I'd bet the first thing to wear down is this crankset.

It really depends on intended intensity. riding super hard is going to put all parts through more wear than riding moderate, relaxed, etc. If you intend to ride super hard, its cheaper in the long run to buy a complete bike with, say 105, or SRAM rival components, than it would be to continually upgrade components as they fail. It really seems like at least crankset, and wheels are vulnerable in this respect, when buying an early bike.
 

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Resident Curmudgeon
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There's a woman in our club that's a blindingly fast rider...very powerful. She goes through a 105 cassette every year. Why? I have no clue. She cleans it & lubes her drive train like anyone else who cares about their bike. I'll ride a 105 cassette for 4-5 years @ 6500 mi/year. BTW, that's about what she rides.
 

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Mr. Versatile said:
There's a woman in our club that's a blindingly fast rider...very powerful. She goes through a 105 cassette every year. Why? I have no clue. She cleans it & lubes her drive train like anyone else who cares about their bike. I'll ride a 105 cassette for 4-5 years @ 6500 mi/year. BTW, that's about what she rides.
I think that depends on your riding style and the amount of shifting you do. I ride +5,000 miles a year and generally replace the cassette yearly or with every 2 chain replacements. I clean and lube the drivetrain religiously.

For the OP. I've never had an issue with Shimano durability. Used RSX, 105, Ultegra and Dura-Ace. My main road ride is DA equipped, 23,000 miles to date and it functions like new. Had an older bike with RSX that I never had to do any adjustment to. In my experience, new parts are for damage replacement or performance upgrades or just to add a little bling to the bike.
 
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