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Banned Sock Puppet
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Now that both of these hub have the "digital" bearing adjustment, there only appear to be three differences between these:

1) Weight, because 9000 uses Ti.

2) 9000 is available in more drilling options whereas 6800 is limited to 32 and 36 holes.

3) Price

Are there any other differences anybody knows about? Are the bearings any larger/smaller, more durable/less durable, roll better/or not? Is the Ti cassette carrier or other Ti parts an issue as far as wear, being that Ti is a softer metal?

Thanks in advance!
 

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It used to be that DA had better seals than Ultegra. I dont think this is the case any longer. To me, the differences are weight (Ti on DA) and number of spokes. Bearing balls are larger 3/16 vs. 5/32 but you wont be able to discern the difference and if you do you could always upgrade the class of bearing balls up a notch if $15 burn a hole in your pocket.
The Ultegra 6800 is a great value hub; more hub than most folks could ever use although rarely admit.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks DC! Are you saying Dura-Ace has larger bearing balls? I would guess that larger bearing balls would be more durable, but weigh more. I would have thought it would be the other way around as Dura-Ace is usually going for the prize of least weight.

But yes, Ultegra is definitely the best bang for the buck. Add $300 for Dura-Ace.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ti is used to INCREASE durability. You've already been told as much in another thread.
Interesting that a softer metal increases durability. Yet, hasn't it been noted that Dura-Ace Ti cassette cogs wear faster than Steel? Steel chain vs. Ti cogs - chain wins. Ti hub carrier vs. Al cassette spider - winner?
 

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Interesting that a softer metal increases durability. Yet, hasn't it been noted that Dura-Ace Ti cassette cogs wear faster than Steel? Steel chain vs. Ti cogs - chain wins. Ti hub carrier vs. Al cassette spider - winner?
Ultegra has a steel freehub? I thought it was alloy, which most non-ti freehubs have and is less durable than titanium.

Whatever, durability is not an issue with titanium freehubs.
 

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Thanks DC! Are you saying Dura-Ace has larger bearing balls? I would guess that larger bearing balls would be more durable, but weigh more. I would have thought it would be the other way around as Dura-Ace is usually going for the prize of least weight.

But yes, Ultegra is definitely the best bang for the buck. Add $300 for Dura-Ace.
Smaller for the front, same diameter but more for the rear. Wheels Manufacturing used to carry different grades so DA grade balls could be used in an Ultegra hub. Not sure what the real life difference is but the option was there.
 

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changingleaf
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Yes, Ultegra has a steel freehub, which is primarily why it's so much heavier than the dura ace. Steel is harder than Ti, but Ti is harder than aluminum so the cassette won't dig into it significantly.

I think Ti is too soft for cassette gears though. The Ti cogs wear extremely fast. I only use Ultegra now. The Dura ace cassette might be okay for a wheel only used for certain applications.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Smaller for the front, same diameter but more for the rear. Wheels Manufacturing used to carry different grades so DA grade balls could be used in an Ultegra hub. Not sure what the real life difference is but the option was there.
Smaller in the front, same size but more in the rear? Interesting. I have to wonder what the motive was in this design. I would think larger and more would be more durable while smaller and fewer would have the weight advantage.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ultegra has a steel freehub? I thought it was alloy, which most non-ti freehubs have and is less durable than titanium.

Whatever, durability is not an issue with titanium freehubs.
Non-Ti freehubs are Al? I stand corrected. Understood.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes, Ultegra has a steel freehub, which is primarily why it's so much heavier than the dura ace. Steel is harder than Ti, but Ti is harder than aluminum so the cassette won't dig into it significantly.

I think Ti is too soft for cassette gears though. The Ti cogs wear extremely fast. I only use Ultegra now. The Dura ace cassette might be okay for a wheel only used for certain applications.

Ahhh, OK. I've heard some horror stories about cassette spiders chewing into freehubs. According to one bike mechanic I talked to, this is more an issue of how tightly the cassette fits onto the freehub, than anything else.

Sounds like the Ti Dura-Ace cassette would be the "race day only" choice. Since I don't race, it's irrelevant.

Thanks for the clarification!
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

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Nothing to tell yet unless someone is aware of insider info. DuraAce is due for its update this summer; whatever this may be.
 

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Does that mean that my Dura Ace-equipped bike will immediately lose 50% of its resale value? :)

Seriously, I think the Shimano non-Dura Ace hubs are a little long in the tooth. They may be fine for noobs (who don't know better) and folks who obsess about durability/maintainability, but with the move towards lower spoke-count wheels and wide-spread availability of very light hubs for less cost, their feature set (spoke count, weight) speak old-school.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Does that mean that my Dura Ace-equipped bike will immediately lose 50% of its resale value? :)

Seriously, I think the Shimano non-Dura Ace hubs are a little long in the tooth. They may be fine for noobs (who don't know better) and folks who obsess about durability/maintainability, but with the move towards lower spoke-count wheels and wide-spread availability of very light hubs for less cost, their feature set (spoke count, weight) speak old-school.
Doesn't everything eventually become old school? If I got 9000 hubs for 50% off, by all means I would bite!

Do I obsess about durability and maintainability? You bet!
 
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