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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started cycling a couple years ago and have logged a couple thousand miles, and I am enjoying it, but I find myself wanting to go faster (and farther), and I'm drawn to the pure sexiness of dedicated time trial/triathlon bikes.

I've been considering getting either a Cervelo P2C or a Felt B2. For the past couple months I've been losing sleep and stressing out and waffling and changing my mind, back and forth about whether it makes any sense at all for me to drop the cash on a TT bike when I already have a perfectly good road bike. I took a P2C for a brief ride (3-4 miles). I felt reasonably comfortable on it, but that's not enough time in the saddle to form any real opinion of it or of TT bikes in general. I was also somewhat preoccupied with riding in an unfamiliar area, traffic, etc.

I have no intention of racing, mostly because I'm old and slow and don't think I could really be competitive. I'd just be doing my regular solo rides on it, and possibly group rides and events, depending on how comfortable I am among other cyclists, and assuming I can stand the aero position on long (over 40 mile) rides.

So. Here's my (unanswerable) question. Should I get a triathlon bike if I have no intention of racing?
 

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Two scoops of inertia.
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resounding answer on the boards is no. A TT bike has a singular end and most consider it a disservice to self to buy one if not racing. You mentioned Cervelo. I remember reading somewhere about setting the Soloist Team up as a TT bike. There's also the Hellafaster by Van Dessel that can serve double duty. Just ad clip-ons. You could figure out if that position suits you and upgrade the frameset later on if you deem it necessary. I'm not convinced you'll make friends on group rides though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the input. I've got aerobars on the road bike, but I find that I'm unable to stay on them for any length of time because the rest of the bike isn't really set up for it. I considered the Soloist, but perhaps I'll just save the cash and stick with my current bike.
 

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if you've got cash to blow, then yes.

If you are considering whether the investment is worth it... it doesn't sound like it is, for you. Most group rides don't allow the use to TT/Tri bikes anyways. it's dangerous to not be near the brakes when riding in a pack. I'd only use it if I were riding solo or with 1 or 2 mates.

The real big differences between a TT bike and a road bike are the aerodynamics of the frame, the seat being farther forward, and the bars. If you've already got the bars, consider a seatpost that puts you farther forward, and more directly above the pedals. Many triathletes race with the nose of the seat directly above the BB. Of course there's nothing you can really do about the frame at this point, but a more aerodynamic frame generally won't FEEL all that much faster to you when you're riding anyways. So if you're wanting to feel like you're going fast, just staying in the aerobars and getting the bike set up for the aero position will give you the most difference.
 

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No. Its not worth getting even if you do have the cash to spend. It won't be the best look turning up to bunch rides on a tt bike. If your just into clocking up the miles stick with your road bike and treat yourself to some new wheels or other parts rather than buying a new bike which will end up gathering dust...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
To clarify, most of my riding on it will be solo. The possibility of doing group rides on it was entirely contingent upon everyone's comfort level. No matter. Sounds like I should concentrate on the engine instead of looking for shiny new hardware.

Just needed someone to save me from myself. That's what I needed to hear. Thanks, all.
 

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Two scoops of inertia.
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If you have a setback seat post you could get some idea of what you're getting yourself into by flipping it forward and adjusting the height/angle of the saddle and handlebars/aerobars around having that orientation to the cranks. If there's NO chance whatsoever of racing I'd think long and hard about it.
 
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