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I have never been a runner and never trained for any type of running event. I am currently running 4 - 5.5 miles 3-4 times a week. Houston marathon/half marathon is at the end of January so plenty of time to train. Experienes, thoughts? It seems like I need something to push me over the edge and just register. Of course it is a lottery this year - you register and then participants are randomly selected on 17Aug.
 

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Captain Obvious
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do it.
 

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no (this reply is too short)
 

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Opus was just napping
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MCF said:
I have never been a runner and never trained for any type of running event. I am currently running 4 - 5.5 miles 3-4 times a week. Houston marathon/half marathon is at the end of January so plenty of time to train. Experienes, thoughts? It seems like I need something to push me over the edge and just register. Of course it is a lottery this year - you register and then participants are randomly selected on 17Aug.
What if you don't get in?

Houston has upset a bunch of people this year going lottery...Boston they ain't.

As for training...I have to ask--do you like to run?
And how are you looking to participate in the half--finish--or compete (at least against yourself).

Finishing 13.1 isn't that hard...racing 13.1, training, sweating and pushing yourself that is considerably harder.

For me the half is when you have to start loving the miles...a good program will have you running up to 15 miles on your LSD runs...will work in tempo or hill repeats, some Yasso 800s for good measure (although they are better measure for the full)...as well as easy runs and perhaps some recovery runs.

My recommendation would be to see if you can average 25-30 miles a week after a slow build to that number...and then look at training. With 4-5 months you can spend some time getting accustomed to a slow build and then latch onto a plan from one of the Guru's (Higdon is always a nice beginning)
 

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You won't have any problem training with that mileage. Just start upping the mileage on one run a week gradually, you wouldn't even need to start for a few months.
 

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If you like running, then yes.

If you don't actually enjoy running, it seems like a waste of time and effort that could be better spent on an activity you really like.
 

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I ran my first half a couple months ago. It was an interesting and somewhat rewarding experience, although I don't think I'll do it again. Running takes a toll on the body that cycling doesn't (at least for my 44 year old body).

Go over to beginnertriathlete.com. You'll get all kinds of advice and encouragement.
 

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absolutely do it

running 4-5 miles already means you're not that far from being ready

pick one day a week for your long run, and ramp that 5 up 10(if you're wanting to do the min) or 15 (if you want raceday to be easy)

run slow on your long runs, run fast during your shorter runs

enjoy the scenery while you're out there, half marathons have so much local talent it's crazy
 

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roscoe said:
run fast during your shorter runs
Ummm...no.

Run fast on designated days that are specifically marked for speedwork. Running too quickly on regular "easy" days...is a sure way to be too fatigued for real speed days and skew your long run pace.

Most run too fast on their easy days and too fast on their LSD...which prevents them from running fast enough on their designated speed days. It cripples real progress.
 

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disgruntled pigskin fan
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I say do it. As TMB said, there's a considerable difference between just running it to finish and racing it. Do you enjoy running?
 

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Opus was just napping
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MCF said:
I wouldn't say I love running, but I don't hate it either. I would do it purely to SURVIVE. I found this program that seems reasonable for me:

http://www.halhigdon.com/halfmarathon/novice.htm

This program still leaves days for lifting and riding (cross days).
Higdon is a good source.

Having said that...and I know it sounds bad when I say this, but while I appreciate those folks that show up for running events which makes it easier for folks like myself to find an event on any given weekend I want to race. I have never understood the bucket list mentality of just doing enough to survive. The half isn't that hard, if you train properly...but you have to train. The race should be the fun part, the confident part, the knowing you did the hard work and now you are going to test your body, cash in your chips and--race.

So you don't hate running--if someone asked me if I like running...I would tell him that even though I ran hill intervals this morning, when I was driving back from my lunch meeting I spied a lone runner pacing herself through campus in 100 degree heat...and my first thought was how jealous I was of her. Running...I love it.

So maybe I am biased, but to me time well spent is doing something you really get off doing. Not something you don't hate...that sounds like work.
 

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Chain said:
Do it, but let the Lounge pick what you will wear...
It should include a tie...at least.

//Shamrock Mary--1/2 Mary revelers in the get drunk after the race tent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
thatsmybush said:
Higdon is a good source.

Having said that...and I know it sounds bad when I say this, but while I appreciate those folks that show up for running events which makes it easier for folks like myself to find an event on any given weekend I want to race. I have never understood the bucket list mentality of just doing enough to survive. The half isn't that hard, if you train properly...but you have to train. The race should be the fun part, the confident part, the knowing you did the hard work and now you are going to test your body, cash in your chips and--race.

So you don't hate running--if someone asked me if I like running...I would tell him that even though I ran hill intervals this morning, when I was driving back from my lunch meeting I spied a lone runner pacing herself through campus in 100 degree heat...and my first thought was how jealous I was of her. Running...I love it.

So maybe I am biased, but to me time well spent is doing something you really get off doing. Not something you don't hate...that sounds like work.
Oh, I think I would do more than survive. When I say survive I mean push myself as hard as I can and never walk during the 13 miles AND survive. Every year I say I just want to survive the MS150 and average 20mph over 180miles...this morning I just wanted to survive my morning run and did 4.4 miles in ~38 minutes. I already have an idea of what I would like to do in my first half (keeping in mind I have NEVER run longer than 6 miles) - that being 2'15".
 

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MCF said:
Oh, I think I would do more than survive. When I say survive I mean push myself as hard as I can and never walk during the 13 miles AND survive. Every year I say I just want to survive the MS150 and average 20mph over 180miles...this morning I just wanted to survive my morning run and did 4.4 miles in ~38 minutes. I already have an idea of what I would like to do in my first half (keeping in mind I have NEVER run longer than 6 miles) - that being 2'15".
Okay...so you are going to do this, some tips from experience and from experts that I have read, spoken with and run with.

1) Find your race pace. Don't know what your race pace is? Find a local 5k race...run it flat out and then go here... http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/mcmillanrunningcalculator.htm

plug it in and see what you should be doing for all of your different types of running from intervals to recovery/LSD runs. It will also make a preliminary determination not based on what you would like, but what you can expect based on a previous race distance...while not foolproof it is a better predictor than nothing and gives you paces for each run you will want to do in training.

Again...your easy runs should be conversational, if you feel like you are pushing you are going to fast. When you are ready to add speed workouts--that is the time to turn yourself inside out. People kvetch that running is hard on their body, because they don't follow proper principles that will keep your body fresh...and running too hard on normal run days is the best way to fatigue and injury.

Your LSD, while not as important as the LSD for a marathon (and I could debate its importance here as well)...make sure you are working a slow pace...90-120 seconds slower than your expected race pace. Remember...you only care about being fast on race day, or speed days.

Speed work...once you have acclimated yourself to running I would recommond step downs or hill intervals. My preference is hill intervals...for me that has been the fastest way for me to gain cardiovascular and muscular increases (which equates to faster running). Step downs is warming up and doing each mile progessively faster...I will do step downs during my midweek longish run (10-12 miles) where I will start easy, move to race pace and then spend the final 3-4 miles dropping your time, it will teach your body to finish strong.


Step back weeks...I believe Higdon incorporates this in his half training (I know he does for his marathon plans), but you should divide your schedule into for week micros. 3 weeks of build one of step back. Or 3 week micros...2 weeks build 1 week step back. This will allow your body to recover and get stronger to be ready for the uptick the following week.

Measure your fitness as a runner not a cyclist. Remember your skeleton needs months to adapt (if not years) to the rigors of running...go to fast and you put yourself on the shelf, build before the body is ready...same thing. Since you have overall fitness from cycling and probably are pretty light you will face the quandry. Error on the side of caution...the longterm benefits aside, it is the only sure way you will make it to the start line healthy.

Enjoy the race.

//bit on form...whether you heel strike (yikes!) or are a midfoot striker (yea!) make sure that your foot hits under your center of gravity...and concentrate on the lift, not the lower.
 

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MCF said:
this morning I just wanted to survive my morning run and did 4.4 miles in ~38 minutes. I already have an idea of what I would like to do in my first half (keeping in mind I have NEVER run longer than 6 miles) - that being 2'15".
It sounds like you at least enjoy running otherwise you wouldn't have gotten up and ran this morning. You've got plenty of time to ramp up the mileage. Follow the Higdon plan and add a mile to your long runs each week for 3 weeks and then back off a week, don't neglect the other runs during the week though. Starting at your 5 mile base you should be able to do more than survive the race. I followed his plan for my first marathon and although my finishing time was slow, but close to my goal time, the plan worked.

This will have an effect on your riding mileage though. My running and riding mileage are not much different this year. Most years it's about 7-1 riding to running, this year about 1.25-1.
 
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