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passes gas, let him draft
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been riding off and on for a year. I have an 06' Giant OCR Carbon bike. I can't remember if C1,C2, or C3. I've put approximately 1000 miles on it. I've done a few 100k's with it. Now I'm at that point where I'm beginning to slowly upgrade what I find gives me a better ride. I've only changed my tires to higher PSI Continental GP4000's, Ultegra pedals, and stem for better seating position.

Some have commented that with my 230lb weight, the carbon frame might be comfortable but also probably flexing with my weight and strength. I've now become aware that it does flex compared to my mtn bike, 02' Cannondale F800. I know this is not an apples to apples comparison so I'd like to know from you guys. Should I swap my carbon frame for a Cannondale CAAD8 or 9 aluminum frame?

One other thing, would most bikes flex while it's attached to a bike trainer stand? I can see the frame flex left to right while I stand and crank as if I was climbing.

Thanks,
 

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my bike's underpowered
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Sorry, but I can't help you w/ flex questions since I haven't experienced it since I last rode a Vitus aluminum 20 years ago.

IMHO, the best thing you can do is test ride one on a familiar road to decide for youirself and have fun doing it.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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If the flex you're referring to occurs only when the bike is mounted on the trainer, forget about it and keep your bike. Riding on the trainer won't damage the bike, but it doesn't emulate riding on the road, either.
 

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passes gas, let him draft
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The most flexing I see is on the trainer. I'm going to test ride an aluminum synapse to see if I see difference.
 

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If you're gonna go backwards, go all the way back and take a look at a high quality steel bike. I doubt that you'll like the harsh nature of aluminum, but you never know.
 

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what you are seeing on the trainer probably isn't flex, rather your wheel moving from side to side as the whole bike is only secured at the drop outs....

1000miles total - your bike hasn't seen much action - doesn't make that much sense to 'upgrade' it.

The stiffness thing is over-rated. Such a casual rider only has to worry if it is causing a significant negative issue such as brake rub at the rear wheel (or front).... that itself may be a wheel/hub issue.

you also state that in that 1000miles, you have done a couple of 100mi rides... in which case, if your bike is 'flexy' its probably the best thing for your style of riding.
 

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passes gas, let him draft
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I do have a problem with the stock wheels. When standing up to climb, the front wheel was rubbing on the brake pads and the speedometer magnet would hit the sensor. I adjusted both a little but the brake pad still continues to rub. The LBS has recommended at least upgrade the front wheel.

After the test drive of the aluminum Synapse, I'll be able to recognize if there are is an advantage. If there isn't, I'll just upgrade to 32 hole wheels for my peace of mind.

Thanks to all for your advice.
 

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All bikes flex, and flex more on a trainer. The flex doesn't make you slower by absorbing power as some bike marketers claim, but you may prefer a stiffer feel.

What wheels do you have? Some wheels are pretty flexy.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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Bosplya said:
I've been riding off and on for a year. I have an 06' Giant OCR Carbon bike. I can't remember if C1,C2, or C3. I've put approximately 1000 miles on it. I've done a few 100k's with it. Now I'm at that point where I'm beginning to slowly upgrade what I find gives me a better ride. I've only changed my tires to higher PSI Continental GP4000's, Ultegra pedals, and stem for better seating position.

Some have commented that with my 230lb weight,
Thanks,
if you're a recreational rider, i'm not sure why you'd change to what would most likely be a harsher riding frame material. also, i'm wondering about the 'higher pressure' tires. i'd recommend going to bigger tires, like 25's or 28's if they fit. that way you have more air volume and can go to lower pressure and have a better ride.
 

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passes gas, let him draft
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
ericm979 said:
All bikes flex, and flex more on a trainer. The flex doesn't make you slower by absorbing power as some bike marketers claim, but you may prefer a stiffer feel.

What wheels do you have? Some wheels are pretty flexy.
Xero XSR-3 wheels.

Front: 1107g Rear: 1209g with skewers and tape, without tire/tubes.

I don't know yet if I prefer a stiffer feel but I know I do like how stiff the Cannondale aluminum frame my mtn bike has.
 

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passes gas, let him draft
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
cxwrench said:
if you're a recreational rider, i'm not sure why you'd change to what would most likely be a harsher riding frame material. also, i'm wondering about the 'higher pressure' tires. i'd recommend going to bigger tires, like 25's or 28's if they fit. that way you have more air volume and can go to lower pressure and have a better ride.
I'm not looking for a more comfortable ride. I'm looking for less rolling resistance. I noticed I was having to peddle to keep up with a buddy on our last ride. We have similar bikes except he had stiffer 32 spoke Mavic open pro/ultegra hubs and 700x23c continentals. We were both surprised to see how much of a difference there was. This is why I chose to go with higher air pressure tires. My current Michelin Dynamics only air up to 102lbs.
 
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