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Last year I decided that after several years of mountain biking I wanted to experience cycling in San Diego. I am not sure what drove me to the change; I think I enjoy the smoothness of riding and being able to move within the county of San Diego using mine own two-legs is a novelty. I think a big part of it is the bike I have seems very nice to me, and compared to mountain biking it seems like I am riding a Ferrari.

So I posted a thread on the purchase I was going to make and ended up buying this bike and absolutely loving this and having a great time. I am posting the link to the thread because 9 out of 10 posters on the thread discouraged me from making the purchase of I think it was $850 for the 2004 or 2005 Trek OCLV. At the bottom is the link to that thread which shows my current ride and how everyone was saying I got gypped by my LBS. In any case I really love the activity of road cycling and have grown to enjoy it more at this point than mountain biking, since my local trails were mostly destroyed in the recent winter rains and I just enjoy going up long hills etc and getting out of where I live, Santee, into metropolitan San Diego.

So since I love this sport, and I bought a semi-cheap bike, should I spend big-bucks and get the real deal bike? If so what would I get that I do not already have? My current ride is carbon and rides very smoothly as far as I can tell and is pretty comfortable, though after about 12 miles my ass starts to get uncomfortable and my feet get a little sore -- that happens to me in mountain too. I did upgrade to nice clip-less pedals and shoes and that is where the soreness in my feet comes in after about an hour of. Anyways, if I spent anywhere from $2500 to $4k, what could I except to get in return compared to what I have now that would make my riding relatively improved? I enjoy riding about 25 miles, and I would like to be able to ride more except as I say my ass hurts a little and feet get sore (not too bad but noticeable) Today I went into the Trek store and they put me on there fitting unit, whatever you call that contraption that hooks into a computer, and from the get go the way the rep had me on a high end Madone my upper body pushed my arms and hands into the handle-bars to the extent I would see carpal tunnel syndrome as a real prospect. When he set it for the Domaine (sp) model it wasn't so bad but I cannot say it was as comfortable as what I have now.

Link to previous thread from when I first got the bike:

Thank you!

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/beginners-corner/my-new-road-bike-what-add-355661.html
 

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Don't see how a different bike will make your feet and ass hurt any less. As you write the only equipment that might be at issue are the pedals ,shoes or saddle.

I upgraded three years ago from a Trek 5200(which I like) to a Colnago C-59 which I like a ton more. The benefit was mostly geometry. The bike weighs a bit less but that was hardly the motivating force. I found the frame rides a bit better too but that can happen when jumping several generations ahead in a Carbon fiber frame and while the 2001 Trek 5200 was a good frame what Colnago puts out in its top of the line is quite a bit better although a C-40 from that era would also have been better I believe.
 

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mantrain - you're about to experience some "roadie duplicity." In the following replies, you'll be inundated with "it's not about the bike" sentiment, e.g. the bike doesn't make a difference, your old bike is fine, no need to upgrade, lose body weight not bike weight... all (okay, mostly) from guys on $3,000+ bikes.

That $2,500 will buy you a new, nicely spec'ed (Shimano Ultegra 6800, etc) bike. It really will feel like a legitimate upgrade from your bike - the 6800 is an amazing groupset. But don't buy it to fix the feet/ass pain - those are likely just products of needing more time on the bike or a fitting - neither requiring a new bike... well, assuming the current Trek is the right size.

If you're really liking the sport, think you're sticking with it indefinitely and the money isn't being pulled from the kids' college fund, I think that $2,500 would be well spent on a new bike.
 

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if its just about a new group set or wheels there's no reason to buy a whole new bike unless the pricing just dictates it. Lots of people rave about that new bike when what they are really raving about are the wheels and group set
 

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Get your ass and feet sorted out, and then, when you're more comfortable, sort out the new bike urge. Are your shoes to tight, that'll cause sore feet. And maybe another saddle would suit you better, try something different. In any case, the more comfortable on the bike the easier it will be to decide on new or up grade.
 

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Go to a good bike shop and get yourself FITTED properly. In your other thread, this was mentioned by a few people. Did you ever do this? If not, find a shop that will put you and your bike on their trainer, watch you pedal and make necessary adjustments. Your pains may be as simple to solve as this.

And no, you don't need a new bike. That vintage of Trek OCLV bikes were quite good. They were made in Wisconsin until after 2009 when they shipped production to Asia. The worst thing about those bikes were the crappy Bontrager wheels it originally came with, but it looks like those were already replaced.
 

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Go to a good bike shop and get yourself FITTED properly. In your other thread, this was mentioned by a few people. Did you ever do this? If not, find a shop that will put you and your bike on their trainer, watch you pedal and make necessary adjustments. Your pains may be as simple to solve as this.

And no, you don't need a new bike. That vintage of Trek OCLV bikes were quite good. They were made in Wisconsin until after 2009 when they shipped production to Asia. The worst thing about those bikes were the crappy Bontrager wheels it originally came with, but it looks like those were already replaced.
The Rolf Vector Comp wheels weren't much better if in fact they were. Their sole virtue was that they were bullet proof. Could ride them over land-mines
 

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The Rolf Vector Comp wheels weren't much better if in fact they were. Their sole virtue was that they were bullet proof. Could ride them over land-mines

It looks like he has Shimano Ultegra wheels.
 

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How often have you been riding and what distances? Really only between 12-25 miles?

Aside from full on bike fitting, have you looked into saddle and different bike shorts/bibs?

You may not need a new bike, but that doesn't mean you might not end up really happy on a new one. Have you actually test-ridden anything in that ~$2500-$3000 price range? Also, if you do go shopping for a new one, don't get to hung up on Endurance vs Racing geometry... just hop on some bikes for test rides.

Per what other folks have said, though, the rear-end pain and foot pain aren't really good reasons to go searching for a whole new bike. But if you really get into the sport and can afford having two bikes, there are quite a few advantages. Your old bike becomes your bad weather bike, backup bike when good one is in shop, and indoor trainer bike, etc.
 

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How often have you been riding and what distances? Really only between 12-25 miles?

Aside from full on bike fitting, have you looked into saddle and different bike shorts/bibs?

You may not need a new bike, but that doesn't mean you might not end up really happy on a new one. Have you actually test-ridden anything in that ~$2500-$3000 price range? Also, if you do go shopping for a new one, don't get to hung up on Endurance vs Racing geometry... just hop on some bikes for test rides.

Per what other folks have said, though, the rear-end pain and foot pain aren't really good reasons to go searching for a whole new bike. But if you really get into the sport and can afford having two bikes, there are quite a few advantages. Your old bike becomes your bad weather bike, backup bike when good one is in shop, and indoor trainer bike, etc.
I am always amazed at how people can afford a new bike, but somehow can't afford to pay for a fitting for their existing one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I am always amazed at how people can afford a new bike, but somehow can't afford to pay for a fitting for their existing one.


Well remember time is a resource too but there is no excuse not to get a good fitting. when I was in Trek yesterday it was agreed for me to come back and get a fitting which I will do.

I guess what I am trying to understand is quite a simple question but maybe not a simple answer: is the new technology versus what I have, with the upgraded wheels etc, a lot better in terms of current ride of my 2004 Trek? How has technology changed from what I have versus what I can get, and how will that translate to a different feel and experience? Are we able to make generalized statements like that? I am not excited about electronic shifters but I just love the feel of a smooth ride that only high-end technology can give you. I think it is the same with any human endeavor involving equipment. The more specialized something is in terms of human technology, the more refined mankind makes something, the more pleasure we tend to derive. But technology is no always linear in time.

Thanks all for the responses!
 

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Last year I decided that after several years of mountain biking I wanted to experience cycling in San Diego. I am not sure what drove me to the change; I think I enjoy the smoothness of riding and being able to move within the county of San Diego using mine own two-legs is a novelty. I think a big part of it is the bike I have seems very nice to me, and compared to mountain biking it seems like I am riding a Ferrari.

So I posted a thread on the purchase I was going to make and ended up buying this bike and absolutely loving this and having a great time. I am posting the link to the thread because 9 out of 10 posters on the thread discouraged me from making the purchase of I think it was $850 for the 2004 or 2005 Trek OCLV. At the bottom is the link to that thread which shows my current ride and how everyone was saying I got gypped by my LBS. In any case I really love the activity of road cycling and have grown to enjoy it more at this point than mountain biking, since my local trails were mostly destroyed in the recent winter rains and I just enjoy going up long hills etc and getting out of where I live, Santee, into metropolitan San Diego.

So since I love this sport, and I bought a semi-cheap bike, should I spend big-bucks and get the real deal bike? If so what would I get that I do not already have? My current ride is carbon and rides very smoothly as far as I can tell and is pretty comfortable, though after about 12 miles my ass starts to get uncomfortable and my feet get a little sore -- that happens to me in mountain too. I did upgrade to nice clip-less pedals and shoes and that is where the soreness in my feet comes in after about an hour of. Anyways, if I spent anywhere from $2500 to $4k, what could I except to get in return compared to what I have now that would make my riding relatively improved? I enjoy riding about 25 miles, and I would like to be able to ride more except as I say my ass hurts a little and feet get sore (not too bad but noticeable) Today I went into the Trek store and they put me on there fitting unit, whatever you call that contraption that hooks into a computer, and from the get go the way the rep had me on a high end Madone my upper body pushed my arms and hands into the handle-bars to the extent I would see carpal tunnel syndrome as a real prospect. When he set it for the Domaine (sp) model it wasn't so bad but I cannot say it was as comfortable as what I have now.

Link to previous thread from when I first got the bike:

Thank you!

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/beginners-corner/my-new-road-bike-what-add-355661.html
1)Did you have a quality MB?

2)Did you do a lot of hard riding?

3)if #3 is "yes", have you been to a Chiropractor*(my left leg was shorter during my fitting and was correct after I visited the Dr.)?

4)Do you have quality shorts with a quality Chamois?

5)How well do your shoes fit(size 10 feet in size 8 shoes won't work for long)?

6)How old are you?

7)Did you change the position of the bar?

*When I originally visited the Doctor, my hips were cantilevered forward and down to the right!
 

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The biggest issue I see with buying a new bike is that you are not comfortable on your current bike. If your fit is not sorted out then how

Biking is not supposed to hurt at all. If your fit is spot on you should literally feel no excess weight on ANY part of your ass, feet, hands and back and should be able to - at least lazily- pedal for 50+ miles.

If you don't know how you are supposed to fit on your bike to be pain free, then how will you know what bike size to splurge on? And if you don't know that then you can't buy a bike.

Fit first. Donate that bike to a museum and enjoy what we all enjoy doing...spending large amounts of money on a hobby we love.

Also, bike fitting, done by a reputable fitter not someone working retail with a vested interest in selling you something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The biggest issue I see with buying a new bike is that you are not comfortable on your current bike. If your fit is not sorted out then how

Biking is not supposed to hurt at all. If your fit is spot on you should literally feel no excess weight on ANY part of your ass, feet, hands and back and should be able to - at least lazily- pedal for 50+ miles.

If you don't know how you are supposed to fit on your bike to be pain free, then how will you know what bike size to splurge on? And if you don't know that then you can't buy a bike.

Fit first. Donate that bike to a museum and enjoy what we all enjoy doing...spending large amounts of money on a hobby we love.

Also, bike fitting, done by a reputable fitter not someone working retail with a vested interest in selling you something.
So how many miles should one be able to ride /out discomfort? Mine after about 14 miles becomes a level 2-3/ 10 1 being worse. I can usually just take a quick break for discomfort to go away and I am wondering should biking be discomfort free no matter how many miles?
 

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You haven't answered any pertinent questions. How about this: get a physical.
 

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You haven't answered any pertinent questions. How about this: get a physical.
I have a shifted and tilted pelvis that gets somewhat better with rigorous stretching and muscle activation exercises but I have to stay on top of it. May I ask what you did to resolve your issue and who you saw for it? PM is fine. Thanks in advance for taking the time out to respond!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You haven't answered any pertinent questions. How about this: get a physical.

my original question remains, not really about fitting, but about technological changes that warrant buying a new mode carbon road-bike. Just like everyone on this board discouraged me from getting this great bike, now everyone is morphing the intent of my question. So if I tweaked my bike a bit so that I would never have any discomfort that means I should not get a technological upgrade? I think people try and be too original with responses. Question remains simple. My fitting issue isn't a huge issue with me bc I can ride for about 90 minutes and then after that there is some mild discomfort that I think with this bike I might be able to tweak in a fit. But I do not want to over tweak it and be worse off by some second guessing computer model. There is something to be said that I can go 90 minutes and not feel a thing at age 49.
 

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I have a shifted and tilted pelvis that gets somewhat better with rigorous stretching and muscle activation exercises but I have to stay on top of it. May I ask what you did to resolve your issue and who you saw for it? PM is fine. Thanks in advance for taking the time out to respond!
Everything is connected and it starts with the feet. I'm flat -footed which causes misalignment of the knees, then the hips, lower/upper back, shoulders and neck. At my worst, the muscles surrounding the head start to constrict causing me to tense-up across the shoulders aggravating the back and hips which makes me walk slightly sideways.

The Chiropractor visits can be painful as the muscles want to pull the body whichever way their used to.
If you want to upgrade, do so. But remember, technology includes the saddle(I rode 135mm for 18 years when my sit-bones needed 143).

I can't walk, but I can ride.... until my lousy bibs curtail my enjoyment.
 
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