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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I'm a newbie and was wondering should I just keep the stock petals on my 2006 trek 1000 or should start my new life of cycling with some clip petals. My worry is since I haven't been on a bike in a long time, I might not be able to have smooth entry/exit with clip petals. Any advice would be great!!
 

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Hey Jessica,

First off, I hope you like your new bike! Now, about your question-I would reccomend upgrading to a pair of clipless pedals. You will get much better power transfer, and be able to have a better spin. I would get look pedals, since they are generally easy to get in and out of(mine are anyway).

Hope this helps,
Jake

By the way-"clip" pedals are actually called clipless ;)
 

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Probably not the first thing to do...

I ride with old-fashioned pedals with toe clips and with clipless pedals about equally, and at least for me, there's no difference in performance. I've probably done my commute (25 mile round trip) at least 200 times each way, and the pedals I use make NO difference at all. I've done centuries both ways, and there's no change in speed, comfort or how tired I get.
I'm not saying clipless don't help--if they didn't, the pros wouldn't race in them. But for a new rider, it's one more thing to worry about, plus you'd be concerned about falling, plus you need new shoes and cleats and you have to install and adust them. It won't hurt anything to ride with what you have until you're comfortable on the bike, and meanwhile you can talk to friends about their favorite pedal-shoe combinations and make an informed choice.
 

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Like flower petals?

:)

If you're worried about falling, either use clipless or platforms (flat pedals), but clips and straps (at least properly adjusted) are even more challenging to get out of in an emergency. You can do quite fine with platforms for most recreational riding.
 

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Argentius said:
Like flower petals?

:)

If you're worried about falling, either use clipless or platforms (flat pedals), but clips and straps (at least properly adjusted) are even more challenging to get out of in an emergency. You can do quite fine with platforms for most recreational riding.
I agree. If you're a true rookie, interested in pleasure riding, I'd suggest you ride the 1st year with your stock pedals. When you get a bit more confidence & experience, you can always upgrade. Remember, If you get clipless pedals, you'll also have to buy cycling shoes to go with them. Shoes start at around $60-70 and go to well over $200. Give yourself some time to make that decision.
 

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I recommend tulips (j/k)

If you're interested in upgrading your "petals," I'm partial to tulips & daffodils. ;) As for your pedals, I'll ditto what others have said about just worrying about getting comfortable & confident on your new bike for the time being. If you spend enough time riding, sooner or later you'll develop an "itchy trigger finger" and want to upgrade something on your bike. That would be the best time to look into clipless pedals. Also, when that time comes, do your homework! There is a dizzying array of options available.
 

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I'm Amazed

I was expecting everyone to parrot Jake B. I think Clipless pedals are way over rated for the average rec. rider and the clearly are the reason for at least 50% of the falls.

Stick with what you got.
 

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I would stick with what you have for now, maybe look into some toe clips. There are toe clips out there that do not require the use of a strap, but what they will do is give you some slight leverage, and more importantly, put your foot in a better position. I quite often see beginner or recreational riders with flat pedals where the pedal is in the arch of your foot (it should be around the ball of your foot).

Go to Nashbar, Performance, or REI and look into one of their name brand touring shoes. They will be low cost, have a stiff sole (making it easier to pedal), and will typically have a good walking sole on them. Almost all of them out on the market have cut-outs where you can eventually upgrade to clipless.

If you go this route, and when you are ready for them, clipless will be much easier. With the touring shoes, you'll be better off with eggbeaters or a shimano pedal/cleat combo. Look, Time, Speedplay are all better (in my opinion) for road riding, but are not all that great for walking in.

Enjoy your new bike! Get out and ride! Oh, and make sure you have a good helmet. Is your head worth the $30 investment or the $100 investment?
 

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KonaMan said:
I would stick with what you have for now, maybe look into some toe clips. There are toe clips out there that do not require the use of a strap, but what they will do is give you some slight leverage, and more importantly, put your foot in a better position. I quite often see beginner or recreational riders with flat pedals where the pedal is in the arch of your foot (it should be around the ball of your foot).

Go to Nashbar, Performance, or REI and look into one of their name brand touring shoes. They will be low cost, have a stiff sole (making it easier to pedal), and will typically have a good walking sole on them. Almost all of them out on the market have cut-outs where you can eventually upgrade to clipless.

If you go this route, and when you are ready for them, clipless will be much easier. With the touring shoes, you'll be better off with eggbeaters or a shimano pedal/cleat combo. Look, Time, Speedplay are all better (in my opinion) for road riding, but are not all that great for walking in.

Enjoy your new bike! Get out and ride! Oh, and make sure you have a good helmet. Is your head worth the $30 investment or the $100 investment?
I agree with everything except the helmet statement. I firmly believe that a helmet should be worn on ALL rides. I always wear one. But in a previous lifetime I must have been from Missouri, the show me state. When statements are made like a $100 helmet will protect better than a $30 helmet, the words, "prove it", immediately flash into my mind. As good as helmets are, most of the higher end stuff is about style & colors. Any helmet that is Snell approved should be fine. Make sure it fits correctly, and is light & comfy. Anything else is just bling.
 

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Mr. Versatile said:
I agree with everything except the helmet statement. I firmly believe that a helmet should be worn on ALL rides. I always wear one. But in a previous lifetime I must have been from Missouri, the show me state. When statements are made like a $100 helmet will protect better than a $30 helmet, the words, "prove it", immediately flash into my mind. As good as helmets are, most of the higher end stuff is about style & colors. Any helmet that is Snell approved should be fine. Make sure it fits correctly, and is light & comfy. Anything else is just bling.
A more expensive helmet will have a better fit in almost all cases. The adjustability and comfort make it better to have. Better ventilation means you won't overheat. I know one beginner rider locally that refused until she got a more expensive helmet that provided better ventilation, the low end ones cuased her to overheat and get migranes. So she'd just take it off and carry it with her. Therefore, the $30 helmet that she didn't like to wear was not protecting her one bit vs. the more expensive one that fit, and cooled her better.
 

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I think about correcting spelling here with some wisenheimer remark and then realize that English is a secondary language for about half the members in this forum.

Like the woman in Paris swearing at the drivers in traffic, calling them "pigs" -- Couchons! Couchons! *LMAO*
 

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False assumption.

I think about correcting spelling here with some wisenheimer remark and then realize that English is a secondary language for about half the members in this forum.
I 'm not entirely clear on what a secondary language is, but English is my second language and I've never had any problems spelling. But I've worked with native English speakers who proudly and cheerfully admitted that they couldn't spell "cat" and proved it many times over. The assumption foreign-born = bad speller doesn't hold water. Then again, what does it matter in the grand scheme of things? I was a lot faster on the bike when I didn't know how to spell "derailleur" than I am now. :)

The problem I'm still having is understanding slang and idiomatic usage, especially if it's from way before my time here in the US. I had to look up "wisenheimer." :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks!!

Well, just to let you all know I was born and raised in the USA and the spelling error was well, a brainfart. I didn't even realize I did it until I started reading my replies. And then it still took me a few to get it. I actually laughed pretty hard and I can just imagine how much of a "newbie" I am really looking like now. But hey, it's cool, thanks for the cycling advice and the spelling advice! But in the end as long as I get cycling advice, that's all that really matters.
 

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jessica47201 said:
Well, just to let you all know I was born and raised in the USA and the spelling error was well, a brainfart. I didn't even realize I did it until I started reading my replies. And then it still took me a few to get it. I actually laughed pretty hard and I can just imagine how much of a "newbie" I am really looking like now. But hey, it's cool, thanks for the cycling advice and the spelling advice! But in the end as long as I get cycling advice, that's all that really matters.
Jess what's your geographical region? There are often swap meets and you can pick up something used cheaper. I started riding again a few years ago and almost immediatly went to clipless, I love them and found some shoes that are comfy for walking and riding(see avatar). If you decide you want to try them used might be the way to go until you know what you want. If you do, pick the pedal that goes with your style of riding; for road riding check out speedplays for ease of use clipping in and out and for touring or commuting check out spds for ease of walking. Good luck.
 

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jessica47201 said:
Ok, I'm a newbie and was wondering should I just keep the stock petals on my 2006 trek 1000 or should start my new life of cycling with some clip petals. My worry is since I haven't been on a bike in a long time, I might not be able to have smooth entry/exit with clip petals. Any advice would be great!!
I also recommend going clipless. It is a much more efficient way to pedal. It is one of those things that once you do it, you cannot believe you got along without it.
When I first did it, I practiced getting in and out for a couple of hours before I went on the road.
First, if you buy clipless pedals, have your LBS adjust them to they are fairly easy to get in and out off. Any good pedal can be adjusted to accomplish that.
Second, practice ingress and egress, as they say at NASA. If you have a trainer, great. Put your bike in the trainer and practice getting in and out of the pedals.
Now, I got my pedals before I got my trainer, so here's what I did - I took my bike outside and put it by the garage. I got on the bike and leaned up against the building, so I couldn't fall. I then practiced getting in and out of the pedals until it felt comfortable and I could do it fairly quickly.
I then rode to a nearby school parking lot (it was a weekend) and rode around in circles clicking in, clicking out, until I felt competent. Only then did I head out on the road. It took some time, but once I was actually riding, I had no problems. I also made it a point to click in and out every chance I had for the first couple of weeks. After a while, it becomes second nature.
And, yes, get a very good helmet. Neurosurgery is a lot more expensive than any helmet.
 

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I strongly believe that:
a. you should always wear a helmet while riding
b. you should get Look clipless pedals

Look pedals are very easy to learn to use. Sure there is a learning curve but it's not steep.
I've seen more people fall because of failure to unclip when using Shimano SPDs (about 85%). It doesn't take a year to appreciate the benefits of riding with clipless pedals. I you vege out and don't pay attention, then you shouldn't be biking because you create a hazard for yourself and others. But since I trust that you do no such thing, getting in/out of clipless pedals becomes second nature. These are much easier to use than straps.

happy riding.
 
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