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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can handle most repairs/adjustments on the bike, but have tried to support the local shops (and save myself some time) so had them do some major tune-ups in the past, but I'm over it. The derailleurs work, but are never perfectly adjusted, they always use way too much cable housing, and sometimes they don't even tighten everything.

It's about time to tackle 2 items that have scared me - hub and headset service/overhaul. I really don't want to go back to the shop to get them done - if they can't adjust the derailleurs right, what are the odds they'll take the time to clean out and regrease my campy hubs properly?

Is it really that hard to do this stuff? Or should I trust it to one of the shops?
 

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It's not hard. You can do it, if you have any mechanical aptitude at all. The Park Tool site is a good place to go for clear and detailed explanations.
 

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Hubs aren't that hard, in particular if they're Campy hubs, in which case you can get all the instructions you need from their website. Headsets are trivial for maintenance, plus, they really don't need much of it, unless you ride in the rain a lot. Replacing a headset, on the other hand, can be tricky if you have no tools for it. If you have the tools, as others have said, it's not hard either.
 

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Cup-and-cone hubs can be a little tricky. It's not hard and Park Tool's site explains it really well (also check youtube, some great videos). You just have to have a little patience till you get it right.

Headsets are a breeze. Unless as Pirx mentioned you're replacing it. But with the right tools it's pretty simple too.

I don't see hubs or headsets any more difficult than getting your derailleurs set up right.
 

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Cup-and-cone hubs can be a little tricky.
Which reminds me: You have to be a bit careful, and be mindful of the kind of hubs you have. Zipps, for example, use (or at least used to use) purely radial bearings (not conical ones) that are supposed to have a bit of play when they're not under load. Just as always, getting the manufacturer's instructions is a god idea. An idea, incidentally, that many shop mechanics don't seem to grasp, which is why I do all my wrenching myself, in particular since I have those "exotic" Campy components...
 

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If your hubs &/or headset use cartridge bearings, then you'll need to replace with new ones, as they're not really meant to be "serviced"... if you can't find which particular ones yours takes online, it'll be stamped on edge of the cartridge, once you pull it apart. You might find the proper ones at a local bearing supply place, or order them from place like Enduro bearings.

Like others said, the park tool repair blog or Sheldon Brown's pages are very helpful.
 

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this is a myth about cartridge bearings. They can be serviced and doing so will extend their service life. Cleaning them will remove contaminants and repacking them sufficiently with good quality grease will make them more resistant to contaminants. Some, such as many ceramic bottom brackets, have recommended service schedules for doing so.

Workshop: Servicing Your Bearings - BikeRadar

If your hubs &/or headset use cartridge bearings, then you'll need to replace with new ones, as they're not really meant to be "serviced"... if you can't find which particular ones yours takes online, it'll be stamped on edge of the cartridge, once you pull it apart. You might find the proper ones at a local bearing supply place, or order them from place like Enduro bearings.

Like others said, the park tool repair blog or Sheldon Brown's pages are very helpful.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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If your hubs &/or headset use cartridge bearings, then you'll need to replace with new ones, as they're not really meant to be "serviced"... if you can't find which particular ones yours takes online, it'll be stamped on edge of the cartridge, once you pull it apart. You might find the proper ones at a local bearing supply place, or order them from place like Enduro bearings.

Like others said, the park tool repair blog or Sheldon Brown's pages are very helpful.
wrong...as stevesbike also posted you can definitely service them and it does make them last longer. especially if you've waste...ermmm, i mean spent a bunch of money on ceramics.
for me, i will run regular steel bearings and clean/lube them a couple of times then replace them. that ends up being a lot of miles for very few $$$.
 

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I can handle most repairs/adjustments on the bike, but have tried to support the local shops (and save myself some time) so had them do some major tune-ups in the past, but I'm over it. The derailleurs work, but are never perfectly adjusted, they always use way too much cable housing, and sometimes they don't even tighten everything.

It's about time to tackle 2 items that have scared me - hub and headset service/overhaul. I really don't want to go back to the shop to get them done - if they can't adjust the derailleurs right, what are the odds they'll take the time to clean out and regrease my campy hubs properly?

Is it really that hard to do this stuff? Or should I trust it to one of the shops?
I hear ya, I dropped mine off for some easy cheesy stuff I did not have time to do. Bar tape, rear wheel truing, lube and check/adjust derailleurs. Well I get the bike back and head home on it, shifted to large chain ring when I tried to drop back to small one no go they had too much tension on the cable. I also wandered what else felt funny on the way home and noticed the rear tire looked low I checked the pressure it was only @40lbs and I always line any writing on a tire up with the valve stem and now it is on the opposite side. So I had to make time to redo most of what they were paid to do, but the bar wrap job was great. It all boils down to attention to detail or the lack of. Maybe a someone that works at a shop can answer this question: Doe the attention to detail vary with the value of the bike ? If so I better stick with doing my own work on my cheap ride. :D
 

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I hear ya, I dropped mine off for some easy cheesy stuff I did not have time to do. Bar tape, rear wheel truing, lube and check/adjust derailleurs. Well I get the bike back and head home on it, shifted to large chain ring when I tried to drop back to small one no go they had too much tension on the cable. I also wandered what else felt funny on the way home and noticed the rear tire looked low I checked the pressure it was only @40lbs and I always line any writing on a tire up with the valve stem and now it is on the opposite side. So I had to make time to redo most of what they were paid to do, but the bar wrap job was great. It all boils down to attention to detail or the lack of. Maybe a someone that works at a shop can answer this question: Doe the attention to detail vary with the value of the bike ? If so I better stick with doing my own work on my cheap ride. :D
I've been working in shops for the last fifteen years and hearing about the stuff you described gets my goat. That's basic, first year knowledge that I drill into anyone I train.

Working in a bike shop has never been a high paying gig. Unless that changes it will never really attract the motivated, detail obsessed people that do quality work.
 

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mea culpa, mea culpa! Thanks for clarifying my ill advised post. I knew I should've put a caveat in my post regarding cartridge bearings:mad2: Got busy at work & didn't get a chance to come back to it. It can be difficult to service them w/o ruining seals, but I haven't messed with any cart. bearings in ~10 yrs... on a bike anyway. Don't get me started on boat trailer bearings, I deal with those at work too often. :thumbsup:
 

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Working in a bike shop has never been a high paying gig. Unless that changes it will never really attract the motivated, detail obsessed people that do quality work.
Even when you have someone who is quality focused, many customers cannot understand the time (and therefore cost) associated with quality work. I know I would never pay a shop to do the detail work I do on bikes.
 

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Hubs are easy. It's a great winter project requiring a couple of cone wrenches, (note, normally front and rear hubs use different sized wrenches.)
Then you will need a pair of correct size box wrenches, hardware store variety. These you will need normally different sizes for front and rear. These handle the lock nuts. Or outer nuts.
When you overhaul a hub you only loosen one side. That way you don't loose your refrence point.
Clean everything super nice and clean and relube. I also rebuild each time with grade 25 ball bearings.
Reassemble. And when you are done spin in your fingers. If it feels rough, then you need to back off you adjustment
If it feels good then put it in the bike and clamp down the quick release.. Now grab the wheel and see if it moves side to side. If it doesn't then you are good. If it moves you need to take it out and adjust it tighter. Repeat previous steps and you are good.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all the replies. I do have one shop close where the guys are all nice, but the wrenches are young and the shop is mostly mountain bikes and only does Shimano/SRAM. They said they could do my Campy Eurus hubs, but the guy didn't sound that confident about it, so I'm hesitant to let them open it up. On the plus side they did say it would only cost $25 per wheel.

I watched this video from Campy: CAMPAGNOLO 2006 2009 SHAMAL EURUS ZONDA HYPERON BORA NEUTRON COMPLETE HUB OVERHAUL - YouTube

But it looks like I'll need specialized tools. Do Campy's instructions make it seem harder than it is?
 

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Aww that's some easy stuff there. You need Allen keys and a small flat head screwdriver.
That speciality tool was to replace the races. In my years of bikes, if you relube once a year and replace bearings you almost never have to replace races.
So take that tool out if it it's a really easy job. Interesting campy is using bearings in cages, that's very old school. But it's apparent that popping these off, and overhauling is what they are all about.
Also you just need new bearings, you can pop the old bearings out of the cage, and replace with fresh balls. Lol lol lol

Totally doable.

Bill
 
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