Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
https://info.silca.cc/silca-professional-pressure-calculator

Enter your name and email address on the right to be able to use the calculator as intended.

This should be an interesting Spring for me as my newest bike came with 32mm tires... way wider than anything I've ever ridden on a road bike. Using the calculator, it's suggesting a tire pressure that is almost half what I typically used on my other bikes with 25mm tires. It's going to feel like I'm riding on marshmallows! :D

 

Attachments

·
Cycling Addict
Joined
·
4,940 Posts
Vittoria used to have a pressure calculator on their website. You would input your weight, which one of their tires you use and what the expected road surface is. You never needed to give them any other information. Now, however, it is an app that you need to install on your phone. Marketing greed wins out every time...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,498 Posts
I've ridden my new 28's on wide rims, rear tire was a little soft on the ride, just a little. Thought I'd check the pressure when I got done with the ride. .... 42psi. I run 55/60r when I 'pump them up'!!!!
 

·
Never Give Up!
Joined
·
1,216 Posts
I don't need another email... however it's a little off, suggesting I ride the following

Rear Tire Pressure (PSI): 90

Front Tire Pressure (PSI): 88

I'm about 132lbs
plus bike/gear 17lbs

I typically ride at...

Rear Tire Pressure (PSI): 80

Front Tire Pressure (PSI): 75
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,052 Posts
You also may want to change pressures depending on use case. I tend to run relatively high pressure on my commuter for flat prevention. The bike would ride nicer at lower pressure, but I really hate dealing with a flat in the morning when I'm trying to get to a meeting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
721 Posts
The truth is that the bigger the tire the lower the pressure you need. I run 50 lbs with 38c tires. Any more and they would be bone jarring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
You'll be happy to know that, without a calculator, I have been riding my perfect tire pressure for a number of years now. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
That’s why this thread is useless. Without rim ID dimensions, tire width and weight rider /bike, tire width it’s crap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,439 Posts
You'll be happy to know that, without a calculator, I have been riding my perfect tire pressure for a number of years now.
Oh come on! You have to have these calculations (and an expensive digital pressure gauge) in order to be a real cyclist. And even though your tires might lose 1 psi per day, you have to check the pressure every day to keep the number EXACTLY where the calculator says. Otherwise, chaos awaits. You've been warned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,164 Posts
Is the calculator really meant for commuting and riding around town? Or, just sport/fitness/training riding? I know Silca and their owner did LOTS of serious research on PSIs for cobbled classic road races, which is great...but I'm just commuting;)

I have always gone with a thumb-squeeze test on my commuter and tend to run lower pressures for comfort and since I've ridden lots of cross, so am used to lower pressures.

Ran the Pro version of the calculator, suggested 48 rear/45.5 front. I used a pressure gauge on my commuter wheels (38 mm Panaracer GravelKings w/tubes on older Mavic Open Pro rims probably 19 mm width) and the pressure I had them at, which felt great, was right around 30! Upper 40s feels way to hard/harsh for me.

This is a commuter bike with a rack, pannier, etc and I ride almost all on a rails-to-trails, so not a lot of bad pavement or (too much) glass. I'm 150 pounds, on most commutes carry a notebook, some light food, a spare wind jacket, so not much added weight.
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
12,607 Posts
No, I don't think I need daily emails from Silca.
^^^This!!!!!.^^^

Dorkypants used to have a fairly decent tire pressure calculator and you didn't have to sign up for SPAM to see it. Apparently the site has been taken down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,333 Posts
^^^This!!!!!.^^^

Dorkypants used to have a fairly decent tire pressure calculator and you didn't have to sign up for SPAM to see it. Apparently the site has been taken down.
What! 😲 That sucks.

The site still exists. But the URL takes you to a googledocs spreadsheet. Looks like a work in progress and not functional.

Have no fear..... web.archive.org to the rescue!
The most recent snapshot was Nov 11. Can't tell when the site went down but the archive is functional.
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
12,607 Posts
Oh come on! You have to have these calculations (and an expensive digital pressure gauge) in order to be a real cyclist. And even though your tires might lose 1 psi per day, you have to check the pressure every day to keep the number EXACTLY where the calculator says. Otherwise, chaos awaits. You've been warned.
Not to mention that this is all a waste unless you use an ultrasonic cleaner for your chain after every ride.
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
12,607 Posts
Have no fear..... web.archive.org to the rescue!
The most recent snapshot was Nov 11. Can't tell when the site went down but the archive is functional.
Cool. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
848 Posts
Tire pressure calculators are rarely (probably never) right.

Use them to get a starting point and work from there. Experiment with different tires and different pressures. Casings make big difference how a tire feels, especially when cornering. Lower is generally better, until you get to the point where you can feel the sidewall collapsing.

Jan Heine wrote a pretty good article in Bicycle Quartely that discusses this.

You tire pressure will vary depending on your system weight, the tire you are using, and the terrain you are riding on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
what if ur out of the saddle a lot redistributing ur weight onto an angled front wheel sprinting or climbing? Could be a lot of time and could greatly change the rolling resistance of the tire

Are tires with more pressure less likely to puncture?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Makes sense. Someone above said otherwise.
I tend to run relatively high pressure on my commuter for flat prevention. The bike would ride nicer at lower pressure, but I really hate dealing with a flat in the morning when I'm trying to get to a meeting.
I feel like I get a lot more flats when it’s wet. Lubing up the glass or drips of rain bumping glass shards into a nice upward point maybe. Maybe just my mind
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top