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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it just me (I doubt it), or has anyone else ever noticed that their sit bones never line up anywhere close to the actual padding in shorts? Why would I want extra padding in the center of the short anyway, where it could just add to the material that pushes into the nerves and arteries?

I've been biking for about thirty years now and I have never had a pair of shorts with good padding that is actually located under the sit bones. I always wear out, and sit hardest, on the edge of the pads. As far as I know, manufacturers use one pad size for all their short sizes, so I don't know how most people could possibly get a good pad placement.

Does anyone have a pair of shorts with an amazing pad that fits any better?

Here's a pic of the spot where my sit bones always hit on the shorts. (where my thumb is)

Comfort Joint Black Active pants
 

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Maybe try some different brands/models of shorts? I don't that problem. Different shorts have different shapes of chamois.
 

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I have experienced this. For me, unfortunately, it's particularly challenging with some of the the higher end brands. I shredded two Assos Cento chamois' because they just hit me in the wrong place (fit was fine).

The older Assos Mille fits me fine, as does the pair of Rapha I have. Oddly, I have a few pairs of less expensive bibs of various brands (performance, nashbar, novara, etc...) and the chamois pad is fine. The problem I usually have with these cheaper brands is the chamois doesn't work well in the thigh crease area and I end up chaffing with them.

The lesson I learned is, to try them on (if at all possible), or buy them from a retailer with a generous return policy.
 

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......the chamois doesn't work well in the thigh crease area and I end up chaffing with them.
This is the problem I am having right now. Strangely, I have been riding over 20K miles without ever having this problem which just cropped up last month. I lost a little weight which may have something to do with it.......maybe.
 

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This is the problem I am having right now. Strangely, I have been riding over 20K miles without ever having this problem which just cropped up last month. I lost a little weight which may have something to do with it.......maybe.
Weight loss, or muscle loss in the thighs could cause the shorts to ride up into your thigh crease. This definitely happened in my case. It's was drove me to looking at higher quality bibs. They (generally) seem to have better quality grips in the thighs, and seems to have a more snug fit.
 

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Weight loss, or muscle loss in the thighs could cause the shorts to ride up into your thigh crease. This definitely happened in my case. It's was drove me to looking at higher quality bibs. They (generally) seem to have better quality grips in the thighs, and seems to have a more snug fit.

I've been doing a ton of riding, so while I lost a little weight recently, I doubt I lost any muscle mass in my thighs.

I've been using Pearl Isumi Elite and Elite Inner-Cool shorts for quite some time without problems. A medium on my still feels quite snug with no bunching, and I really have to do the shake and dance after putting them on to get everything in the right place.
 

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I've been doing a ton of riding, so while I lost a little weight recently, I doubt I lost any muscle mass in my thighs.

I've been using Pearl Isumi Elite and Elite Inner-Cool shorts for quite some time without problems. A medium on my still feels quite snug with no bunching, and I really have to do the shake and dance after putting them on to get everything in the right place.
I've ridden 7500 miles this year so far. My most ever. I've lost about 5lbs on the scale, but I'm definitely leaner, and my legs are a little thinner than at the start of the year. It's definitely noticeable on some of my bibs.
 

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It's brand/body shape specific. I've had some where my sit bones were all the way on the very back end of the pad. And others where they're right where they're supposed to be. Sometimes even the same brand but different models.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Too bad there's not some calculation to be able to order shorts with a correctly located pad the first time.
 

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Ya, I've always mail-ordered my shorts, which is probably not the nest way to buy shorts.
well, I guess it depends. I've never had any trouble with it; maybe I've just been lucky. I've used Performance house-brand shorts for the last 25 years without any issues.

What brand/model are those shorts? That looks like a weirdly-shaped pad IME. Here's a shot of a pair of Performance Elite shorts from a similar angle.
Product Black Grey
 

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Like with ALL clothing. You're taking a big risk if you don't try it on before you buy.

Do you know of a store that lets you try on bike shorts? This would be like allowing people to try on underwear which I doubt any stores will allow.
 

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Do you know of a store that lets you try on bike shorts? This would be like allowing people to try on underwear which I doubt any stores will allow.
Any/all of them.
Leave your undies on. Really no different than trying on a swimsuit.
How do you know that the shorts you bought online weren't returned by someone else because they didn't fit?

The Gross Truth About Trying On A New Swimsuit | Huffington Post
Even though the risk is remote, there are some simple ways to minimize the risk of contact during a swimsuit shopping spree.
1.Wear protection. Because swimsuit liners can be easily removed and are often worn by more than one person, Tierno recommends keeping your underwear on when trying them on. Then, be sure to wash that pair of undies when you get home.
2.Wash your suit. Buying a new swimsuit that’s been tried on by others is very much like buying used clothing from a thrift store in terms of germs, says Tierno. Pop your new suit in the washing machine before heading to the beach. Soapy water will dislodge the germs that may otherwise make you sick. Even for men, who may be less likely to try on trunks in the dressing room, washing is still key. The articles often come from foreign countries and have been contaminated, not only by dirty hands, but by germ-ridden machinery.
3.Hit the sink. It’s not only about cleaning the swimsuit — cleaning yourself is just as vital when it comes to trying on swimwear. “Hand washing is the single most important thing to do to protect yourself after handling dirty items,” Tierno tells The Huffington Post. “So don’t go to eat directly after buying your swimsuit.”
 

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yes, I've had that issue.
When I first started riding I bought shorts a bit to big not realizing they work better when really really tight.
Not always perfect center not that I get them super tight but good enough.
I don't know if the pad is different size in the smaller shorts or not but it's definitely better positioned for me. yes, I'm talking about a compare of same brand same model in different sizes.
 

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Any/all of them.
Leave your undies on. Really no different than trying on a swimsuit.
How do you know that the shorts you bought online weren't returned by someone else because they didn't fit?

The Gross Truth About Trying On A New Swimsuit | Huffington Post
Even though the risk is remote, there are some simple ways to minimize the risk of contact during a swimsuit shopping spree.
1.Wear protection. Because swimsuit liners can be easily removed and are often worn by more than one person, Tierno recommends keeping your underwear on when trying them on. Then, be sure to wash that pair of undies when you get home.
2.Wash your suit. Buying a new swimsuit that’s been tried on by others is very much like buying used clothing from a thrift store in terms of germs, says Tierno. Pop your new suit in the washing machine before heading to the beach. Soapy water will dislodge the germs that may otherwise make you sick. Even for men, who may be less likely to try on trunks in the dressing room, washing is still key. The articles often come from foreign countries and have been contaminated, not only by dirty hands, but by germ-ridden machinery.
3.Hit the sink. It’s not only about cleaning the swimsuit — cleaning yourself is just as vital when it comes to trying on swimwear. “Hand washing is the single most important thing to do to protect yourself after handling dirty items,” Tierno tells The Huffington Post. “So don’t go to eat directly after buying your swimsuit.”


Hmmm. Wearing liners before trying on bike shorts, swim suits, etc., has one minor flaw - the garment will appear to fit tighter! Remember the infamous OJ Simpson glove scene and the satirical Seinfeld episode with the woman trying on her bra over her clothing?

And I wash ALL clothing before I wear it. Not because I'm afraid of germs, but because new clothing is treated with all kinds of chemicals including formaldehyde.
 
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