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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. I'm going to be purchasing a Moots vamoots in the near future. I'm not particularly rich, so this frame is a huge investment for me. I really want to get the sizing right. I am 6' 1" (maybe 6' .75") with a 34" inseam and average length arms (for my height). When I went to the bike store, the salesman originally had me on a 59cm with a 110 mm stem, but then reconsidered and stated I should get the 57.5cm with a 120mm stem. Does the 57.5 seem reasonable or should I go for the 59 cm? Thanks so much for your help.

Here are the specs for the two frames:
http://www.moots.com/#/product/bicycles/road_+_cross/vamoots/
 

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info...

In this case, either size can be made to fit the same, but the smaller size has a 15mm shorter head tube. That means that you will need that much more spacer or a different stem angle to make up the difference.

The decision on which would produce the best setup depends on your actual saddle height and the amount of saddle to handlebar drop that you can tolerate. If you're inexperienced, it's likely that the amount of drop that you can tolerate will increase over time. The larger frame might seem like the best choice now, but might not later.

I you post an actual saddle height, from the center of the BB to the top of the saddle, measured along the centerline of the seat tube, more accurate advice can be given. I wouldn't give advice based on your 34 inch inseam, because a lot of people don't post an accurate cycling inseam. An accurate saddle height is what's needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I measured the saddle height on my mountain bike (my road bike was stolen- old and didn't really fit anyway) and it was 76.5cm (~30 inches) from the center of the bottom bracket to the top of the saddle. Thanks again for the help.
 

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eminence grease
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I'm 5'11" with a 33.75" inseam and I am perfectly comfortable on a 57 Vamoots. I also have a 57 Psychlo. I ride with a 75.5 saddle height.

But I'm not you, I have my arms and my preferred way of riding.

I agree with C40, you can make either one fit. Once you get beyond top tube length and stem choice, it really boils down to head tube length and how many spacers you may or may not need to achieve the drop you want. I always build around a 15-16 headtube, as it gives me the drop I need with very few spacers. Too long, and you may never get as low as you want. Too short and you use a mess of spacers. I would concentrate on that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
He Terry,
Thanks... Just a quick question or two- being that my saddle is 1 cm higher than yours, how many spacers do you use with a 16 cm head tube (I'm guessing I'll need one cm more) Also what size stem are you running and what angle? I'm planning on running a 120 with a 10 degree upward angle (does that sound reasonable).
 

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cps1 said:
He Terry,
Thanks... Just a quick question or two- being that my saddle is 1 cm higher than yours, how many spacers do you use with a 16 cm head tube (I'm guessing I'll need one cm more) Also what size stem are you running and what angle? I'm planning on running a 120 with a 10 degree upward angle (does that sound reasonable).
I run one, 5mm spacer and 120 stem which I believe is a 6 degree - it's Moots'.
 

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cps1 said:
He Terry,
Thanks... Just a quick question or two- being that my saddle is 1 cm higher than yours, how many spacers do you use with a 16 cm head tube (I'm guessing I'll need one cm more) Also what size stem are you running and what angle? I'm planning on running a 120 with a 10 degree upward angle (does that sound reasonable).
Unfortunately, this is one you'll probably have to guess by intuition. The effective difference between the two frame/stem combinations is small, but there is a difference, and one will definitely work better for you- in other words, simply switching out a stem is not a wash. If I were the salesman, and didn't know you well, I'd probably err on the larger frame- more people , especially non-racers tend to complain about bars too low than too high, the larger frame would be more typical of the "average" person of your height (that's without knowing any more details of course). Unless your riding style is frequent competitive group rides/races/aggressive riding you are more likely to be more comfortable with your bars set a couple of cms higher, which can be done more easily with higher options on the larger frame. I cringe when I look at the various setups on group rides- even masters racers who should know better (or maybe in denial that they don't like to bend as much as they used to :cryin: ), with about a mile of stacked up spacers because the frame's too damn small (ie short headtubes). Take a look next time you see a bunch of "serious" riders. If you want to get low and fast, well ride the drops, that's what they're there for- so many riders rarely use them because they are too low for most people to comfortably stay there very long. You can always get deeper drops on the larger frame if you really want to get down and boogie, but shallow bars are much more commonly preferred than deep drop bars, meaning that few people have a problem getting low enough, even for road racing. You're considering a 10deg rise on your stem- if you've tried the position on the smaller frame that needs a 10deg stem then all the more reason to consider the larger frame with a more typical (for road) 0-6deg stem. The difference of 5 degrees of rise is approximately 1cm in bar height. Of course, this is all conjecture without seeing you on the bikes. Even then, you need a good long ride for the small differences to come out. I have several road bikes varying between 56-58cm in "size" , all set up with shorter or longer stems to end up at the same distance between the seat and the bars, and consistent bar height. They all feel pretty much identical until I'm in a hard fast race, or I've got more than 4 hours in the saddle. At those points, where my limits are being felt, one bike or another is preferable, the difference between "identical" setups is definitely discernable. But most of us tend to get dialed in to what we're used to, so don't get too obsessed with the decision. The problem sounds like you don't already have a road bike as a first point of reference to start from, so it's pretty hard to get it dialed exactly with the first bike- always a risk with buying a high end bike without some previous experience. Anyway, unless your arms are disproportionately short for your height, I'd probably go with the larger frame. Paying for a second opinion and getting fit by another (experienced) fitter might be good insurance. Cheers- you'll love the Moots, that would be my first choice in a new Ti road bike-
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Quickly- I made a mistake about the stem. It's ten degrees but pointed down pointed down. The head tube is 16 cm, so with a few cm of riser I have 0 drop. I think I'm going to go with the smaller frame. I had it sized by wrench science (not online, actually went to the store) and that is what they recommended. Thanks again to all who responded, appreciate it.
 
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