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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a new one. I recently put a new chain on my bike and it skipped in my first training race. I thought that it was just a rookie move of new chain with older cassetted and so replaced the cassette and small inner chainring too. Also, did new cable and housing for rear derailleur. Still had skipping. Now, this was driving me crazy. Then, when riding today, I realized that it only skips when on the big ring and it is skipping on the big ring - not on the cassette.

I've heard of rings getting worn out but I think it's only a year old. It's a FSA super - or whatever some of their expensive rings are called. I guess I'll have to replace it but it seems odd to me that this would happen. The chain is a KMC and I run campy 10. I keep wondering whether I may have assembled the chain incorrectly but I don't think so. I really did some hard stomping on the small chainring but it never skipped at all.

Any advice appreciated. I sprinted hard in the big ring all through last season and it was not until the new chain went on that the chain skips on the big ring in the most dangerous way - the chain sometimes just flies right off the big ring.
 

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Boobies!
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Also check your chainline--should be specs with your crank. New stiffer chain may be pointing to misalignment...
D
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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paredown said:
Also check your chainline--should be specs with your crank. New stiffer chain may be pointing to misalignment...
D
it's pretty odd to have chainline problems w/ modern drivetrains. it's possible the frame is not aligned correctly, but it's weird that it would coincide w/ putting new drivetrain parts on. without seeing the bike and putting it up in a stand it's really hard to diagnose problems like these.
 

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If the chainring's teeth are worn, they will look like a shark's dorsal fin. If it is only a year old, it probably isn't worn yet. A big ring will usually last at least 5-10K miles, sometimes much more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Resolved - New Big chainring

Thanks for your replies. I put a new big chainring on it and problem solved. It's possible that the ring had two seasons on it and not one. And, perhaps that was 10k-12k in miles. Although, I mainly train in the small ring so I'm still surprised that it was toast.

I've been riding a long time but I suppose it's always good to relearn the lesson to chains often. Otherwise the cassetted and chainrings will get trashed.
 

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Maintaining the big ring

ridewt said:
It's possible that the ring had two seasons on it and not one. And, perhaps that was 10k-12k in miles. Although, I mainly train in the small ring so I'm still surprised that it was toast.

I've been riding a long time but I suppose it's always good to relearn the lesson to [change] chains often. Otherwise the cassetted and chainrings will get trashed.
If your chainring only lasted 10-12k miles, with you mainly riding in the small ring, then you were either running a very soft chainring, letting your chain get very dirty so that it applied some serious "grinding paste" action to the chainring, or letting your chain get REALLY elongated before changing it. I got about 65k miles out of my last Campy Record large chainring, and I ride in the big ring almost exclusively (it's mostly flat here, and the hills aren't that steep).
 
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