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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings! New to the forum. New to Road Bikes, too. Definitely not new to MTB riding and wrenching. I just bought a Specialized Roubaix Elite SL2 to get me started in this road bike endeavor and it's shod in new Conti Gatorskins. Using it as an endurance builder to supplement my 2-3 day a week MTB trail riding here on the Central Coast of CA.

It's all about tubeless on the mtb front. I'm not knowledgeable on that aspect of road wheels, yet but I was considering utilizing a sealant product in my road tubes to help guard against the inevitable puncture. At least the small ones. I was wondering if this is a common practice among riders on the road? I've been beta-testing a new Slime product for the MTB market since November and will likely use that as my sealant but I also sport Orangeseal in some of my applications. Curious to know what others are doing...or NOT doing and why?
 

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Greetings! New to the forum. New to Road Bikes, too. Definitely not new to MTB riding and wrenching. I just bought a Specialized Roubaix Elite SL2 to get me started in this road bike endeavor and it's shod in new Conti Gatorskins. Using it as an endurance builder to supplement my 2-3 day a week MTB trail riding here on the Central Coast of CA.

It's all about tubeless on the mtb front. I'm not knowledgeable on that aspect of road wheels, yet but I was considering utilizing a sealant product in my road tubes to help guard against the inevitable puncture. At least the small ones. I was wondering if this is a common practice among riders on the road? I've been beta-testing a new Slime product for the MTB market since November and will likely use that as my sealant but I also sport Orangeseal in some of my applications. Curious to know what others are doing...or NOT doing and why?
I use sealant in tubes for specific applications. When I do, I always use glycol based sealants like Flat Attack or Specialized so they don't dry out or rot the tube out. Effective on small punctures.
 

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A group of us tried Slime to thwart goat head thorns in tubed road tires. It kinda worked a little, but not well enough to continue to use. Stan's or Bontrager sealant in tubeless setups definitely works.
 

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Just use tubes alone. From what I understand in certain areas because of thorns there are 'special' needs but otherwise just tubes are fine. At the risk if jinxing myself; I haven't have a flat in over 10k miles and I use light race tires and ride in the city a lot.
 

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I've never heard of anyone using sealant in tubes on the road. I've never heard of anyone using on MTB tubes either. Tubeless yes, but not in tubes. Sounds like a giant PITA.
Flat's aren't that big of a deal.
Well Slowtwitch did an extensive test on using sealant in tubed tires. Sealant Test - Part 1 - Slowtwitch.com

Slime also makes a tube made with sealant in it...in a 700 size.

Yes, sealant in tubes is used by some, but not me. I go tubeless.

I believe sealants are only marginally effective on road tubes for 2 reasons:

1.) The tubes are much thinner than the casing of a tubeless tire, thus there is a shorter "canal" of the puncture through the material for the sealant to grab onto to form a seal.

2.) The tube does not have any reinforcing cords to prevent to puncture from elastically enlarging when it forms. An inflated tube, like a balloon, whats to pull away from the point of puncture as the structure is in tension. With a tire, the relatively non elastic cords hold the rubber close together.
 

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Shortly after starting serious road riding 6 years ago, I was complaining of flats and was told by an experienced roadie to put 1 ounce of Stans No-Tubes in each inner tube and have been doing it ever since on my bike and my wife's. Went about 9k miles without a flat. Changed bikes and before I replaced the tubes and added Stans to it, I went out for a ride and flatted on the first ride with the new bike. I have continued to use Stans. Have gotten a few flats, but very few. One was a screw puncture that nothing would stop. I don't see a downside to it's use. I do replace the tubes every year - if nothing else it keeps me in practice for changing tubes should I need it on the road for myself or to help others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Shortly after starting serious road riding 6 years ago, I was complaining of flats and was told by an experienced roadie to put 1 ounce of Stans No-Tubes in each inner tube and have been doing it ever since on my bike and my wife's. Went about 9k miles without a flat. Changed bikes and before I replaced the tubes and added Stans to it, I went out for a ride and flatted on the first ride with the new bike. I have continued to use Stans. Have gotten a few flats, but very few. One was a screw puncture that nothing would stop. I don't see a downside to it's use. I do replace the tubes every year - if nothing else it keeps me in practice for changing tubes should I need it on the road for myself or to help others.
That seems to me a prudent approach. I just went in and bought a bunch of new tubes from Art's, all with removable cores, and when my wheels come back from the shop in the morning, I'm going to change out the tubes and add some sealant and give it a go. Fixing flats in tubes isn't that tough but if there's something that might prevent a flat from happening in the first place, why not use it? Goat heads are the prevalent offender on my local roadways in the rural riding areas. 3 years ago after my surgery and during recovery I started on a flat-bar road bike as I was getting into mtb. I had several goat head experiences but got off the road all together so never went further with the sealant issue. As I get more in to this, no doubt I'll be upgrading my wheels and will likely go tubeless.
 
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