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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I finally completed one of my goals this past Sunday, which was to do a solo Century ride. I brought a CamelBak full of H20, Gels, Cliff Bars, sandwich, and two bottles of Gatorade. Made sure I was well hydrated and I ate accordingly. On my Garmin, it reads 5,900 feet of climbing and 6:15 of ride time. All-in-all, I felt good.

Today (Wednesday) was the first time back on the bike, and I felt like I was swimming against the tide. I was off 1.5-2mph on my daily 16 mile loop, and it just felt weird. I even checked twice to see if my brakes were rubbing. Lungs and heart rate were fine, but the legs didn't have much at all. But... my legs are not sore at all, so it's a bit strange.

Any ideas on what I may have done wrong to screw up my body in the short term. 46 year old male, ride 4-6 times per week, very healthy, blah, blah blah...

Thanks for the advice
 

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I would say this is probably pretty normal... I often feel very tired/weak when lifting weights (not exactly the same thing as cycling, but you get the idea) even as long as three days after the last session.

Give ride again in a day or so and see how you feel.
 

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Welcome to "old age".... :D (I'm 45, I feel your pain)

You'll be fine, just take it easy for a bit.

Today (Wednesday) was the first time back on the bike, and I felt like I was swimming against the tide. I was off 1.5-2mph on my daily 16 mile loop, and it just felt weird. I even checked twice to see if my brakes were rubbing. Lungs and heart rate were fine, but the legs didn't have much at all. But... my legs are not sore at all, so it's a bit strange.
 

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I rode a century on Sunday (Strava challenge) It was a brutally windy day and I did a fair amount of climbing too. One of the worst rides I've ever done. I was just fried at the end. Here it is Thursday, I got on the trainer and had nothing. I bailed after 45 min. Its amazing how long it can take to recover (I'm 52).
 

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Eating and testosterone

After a long ride your body has undergone a lot of stress. Your red blood cells may be depleted. Psychologically you may perceive that you are "tired". However, the stress has probably also raised your testosterone level to new highs. Be careful not to satiate yourself with food at this point; you will become satiated and your testosterone levels will drop. Instead, only eat what you can kill on the road with your bicycle: squirrels and cats are your bread and butter, small yapping dogs trying to catch you going up a steep grade make a good hamburger, if you are lucky, and hungry enough, you may be able to score a wild boar which has just gorged meal on wild truffles.
 

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After looking at this thread, I went to my spreadsheet to see exactly how I was affected after big rides. I found that in 2011, my 1st full year of cycling, I typically rode about 1 mph slower than my average after big rides. In 2012, I trained specifically to do a 2 day event. There was no drop-off in my performance when riding shortly after an event.

You can train your body to be able to ride consistently at a particular level for multiple days if that is your goal.
 

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Lots of good posts here.
 
First things first: Congrats on your century ride. That is a milestone many never make. Riding a century ride takes commitment, desire, determination and some conditioning. A time of 6 hours 15 minutes is not too shabby either.
 
I am 52, and an avid long distance rider (hence my screen name 'oldermileeater' - a name given to me by some fellow cycling friends). It's difficult for anyone to give an accurate thought with the info given. How long have you been riding? Are you relatively new at it, or back at it after some time away from it (yes some people start at a later age or get back into it after a long hiatus)? You mentioned a solo century being a 'goal', so I am assuming this is either your first century, or at least you do not have many to your credit. how many miles in your 4 to 6 rides per week? What do you do annually? The questions can go on and on, and no two bodies are the same. So what works for someone else may not work for you.
 
Me? In 2012, I logged 14,500 miles. Loads of centuries, over a dozen double centuries, and three triple centuries (the doubles and triples were all within a 24 hour time span). The bulk of my miles naturally being from spring through fall. My total for 2013 so far is just over 2,500 miles (as of today - March 12). I finally did my first century of this year a month ago, and so far, have done at least 1 per week. Today was 135 miles. Tomorrow will maybe be 20 or 30 (light day/recovery day). The magic word is 'recovery'. Depending on how 'seasoned' you are, you may have needed an extra day or two. One thing that works for me is something I already mentioned - a light day (or two, or three) for recovery. I do find that if I stay off the bike for several days after a double century, I need a day or two to get my average speed back up. I do better with light riding days after what is for me a long one. Even after my triple centuries, I rode at least an hour the following day. In my opinion, you are keeping the muscles awake (so to speak), but not really tearing yourself down. But that's only my opinion, and it does work for me. A couple of hours is a light day for me. Maybe a half hour or an hour will work for you. Some riders have days they do not ride at all, but I have found if I do not ride after a long endurance ride, I need a little time to 'wake my muscles up'. I do far better with light days after a long ride. I have to admit it also depends on what you are riding. My bike is NOt state-of-the-art by any means. It's a retro steel frame road bike, and the only thing that comes up to state-of-the-art are my wheel sets (which in some ways also play a role in performance). My bike weighs in at 27 pounds as it sits now, so what works for me with what I am riding now may not work for me if I am on aluminum or carbon fiber. Then there are other things like rest, nutrition, attitude, weather (wind can be a big day breaker) - there are many things that can hinder your performance and you not realize it.
 
Over-all, I agree what you are experiencing is pretty normal. took me a good while to 'fine tune' myself and find my balance point. See what happens if you either ride a bit sooner or a bit later after your next long ride. Maybe as with me, light riding days may work after a long ride, and until your next. On hydration: Make sure you do not OVER-HYDRATE (yes this is possible).
 
Again, congrats on the solo century. Long distance riding gets in the blood.
 

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Oldermileeater,

I must say, I am NOT 52, I am NOT riding a 27 lb behemoth, and I do NOT ride anywhere near 14,500 miles in a year. I'm going into my 3rd full season of cycling, and I am closing in on 10,000 miles. In other words, YOU ROCK!:9:
 

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Oldermileeater,

I must say, I am NOT 52, I am NOT riding a 27 lb behemoth, and I do NOT ride anywhere near 14,500 miles in a year. I'm going into my 3rd full season of cycling, and I am closing in on 10,000 miles. In other words, YOU ROCK!:9:

I appreciate that. I do have to say that the miles come from way too much time on my hands (I have been among the ranks of the unemployed for quite some time). I have enjoyed cycling on and off for 40 years, and always been a distance rider. Old retro steel aside, if I did not have the time I have, I would not have done anywhere near 14,500 miles in 2012. That is my best total, but am well on track to beating that this year. Many kudos to you. I assume you do not have the time I do, yet are near 10,000 miles going into your 3rd season. For someone with a life other than cycling, that is great riding. When I am back to work, I am sure I'll be back down to 4,000 - 5,000 mile years. That's what I was doing before becoming unemployed.
 

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give your self a break you just rode 100 miles!! I'm 43 and just did my 1st metric and my legs are still sore 2 days after, i want to ride my normal uphill route today but I think I'm gonna scratch that thought and just read some bike magazines instead..maybe just 7 miles with 600ft elevation..maybe..i need a nap..
 

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It's been near two months since my last post on the forum here, mainly because I have been living on the bicycle. I plan on posting a few things in 'general discussion' - not to brag, but to try to encourage / motivate. Since becoming unemployed a few years ago, my miles have been going up and up. I am 52 (as mentioned earlier), so age is not always a barrier. I suppose it helps to be about, or little more than the same weight as an N.F.L. Cheerleader, never smoked, and been active your whole life to ride big miles routinely on the bike. So for those who may be in this category, don't think you can't ride big with some intense years behind you (yes it does take some time). Since mid May, I have been averaging 100+ miles each day (some days little more than 60 - 70 miles, other days well over 100 miles with some double and triple centuries thrown in). I am in the Piedmont region of South Central Virginia (between Roanoke and Lynchburg), so it's constant hills, and to boot, I am riding a very retro 27 pound steel frame Road Bike. My 100+ mile days are all in the 17 - 18 MPH average. June was a big month with 3,500 total miles for that month, and I beat my personal best for my fastest 1,000 miles. It was 5 days, it is now 3 1/2 days and I made 1,125 miles within the 96 hour time frame. I also closed out June with 10,700 miles since January 1st, so 20,000 miles for 2013 seems doable. A couple of years ago, if someone were to tell me I'd ride 20k miles in a year, I would have laughed that off (2011 was a 12,000 mile year and 2012 was 14,500 total miles). Anyway, I mentioned more than I really wanted to here. All this will be repeated in more detail when I post in the 'general discussion' part of this forum (or if I see a more appropriate area for long distance / endurance riding, I'll post there). I not only want to encourage and motivate, but I am open to questions about how I do it (how I attack the rides - etc.). Until the weather starts getting really cold, I will probably be on here for limited times since I have all this TIME on my hands, I am spending it on the bicycle while waiting for a job. This week, I plan to leave on my fourth 450 mile (one way) ride to New York City (visiting friends in Philly and New York), so I'll be gone a week or two on that. But I will answer any inquiries ASAP.

I was asked by a member some time ago if I was "addicted" to cycling. I said not necessarily. Maybe I am. I just know I enjoy riding, and the health benefits if one rides correctly are hard to beat.
 

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give your self a break you just rode 100 miles!! I'm 43 and just did my 1st metric and my legs are still sore 2 days after, i want to ride my normal uphill route today but I think I'm gonna scratch that thought and just read some bike magazines instead..maybe just 7 miles with 600ft elevation..maybe..i need a nap..
I did my second metric yesterday (first of this year) and my a$$ hurts... my legs are fatigued, but don't hurt.

I'm not sure if its the bibs I was wearing, my seat, or both, but there's no way I'm sitting on a bicycle today!
 

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Man, I'm so jealous of the time you have to ride.
I am assuming you meant me. Actually riding is all I have. I am jealous of those with JOBS. Until I get a job (ROFL - lot's of luck in this hick middle of no where area), I will continue to ride all day every (nice) day. It's only for my satisfaction. I am not a pro, nor do I compete, so I suppose many would ask 'why so many miles / so much riding?'. ESCAPE would be the answer I guess. Maybe someday I can get on a big ride for charity, or get on something where older endurance riders are sought after - who knows.

Reading through this (and similar) threads is why I will eventually post a new thread on big riding, and how I manage it where fatigue and pain (especially saddle pain) are concerned. I'll probably just do the new thread here (Endurance Riding) - not General Discussions. I am leaving on another 450 mile (one way) ride this week (maybe thursday morning). If I have not done the new thread by then, I'll do it when I get back.

For now, I suppose my shortest answer to the how I do it is I just ignore little fatigues and pains and keep riding day after day. After a while, it's all the same and does not get worse. Sure, certain days I will be slower after a big ride day, but that is normal for just about anyone.
 
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