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TheHeadlessThompsonGunner
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
...teaching English for the Fed. The place I have to stay, with my girlfriend (fiancée, maybe), is basically next-door to Bon Marché, so chances are it's going to be teaching English to real brats. But I don't really care: it's a job working for socialists, and it's not going to go anywhere any time soon.

But it'll mean leaving beautiful, totally unrealistic Boulder, CO, to live in a ginourmous city where I don't really speak the language. And no more working, care-free, in bike shops and blowing all my money on beer and bicycles, either. And I'm going to apply for law schools in the fall, which might be made much more difficult by the distance. What's to do? Go for the experience - and obviously leave my bike behind - or stay in a place I've come to like in the decade I've lived there (excepting some years in Calgary and, most recently, four semesters in Montréal just to be sure I didn't hate Boulder at all) and stick with the care-free thing?
 

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Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
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Applesauce said:
...teaching English for the Fed. The place I have to stay, with my girlfriend (fiancée, maybe), is basically next-door to Bon Marché, so chances are it's going to be teaching English to real brats. But I don't really care: it's a job working for socialists, and it's not going to go anywhere any time soon.

But it'll mean leaving beautiful, totally unrealistic Boulder, CO, to live in a ginourmous city where I don't really speak the language. And no more working, care-free, in bike shops and blowing all my money on beer and bicycles, either. And I'm going to apply for law schools in the fall, which might be made much more difficult by the distance. What's to do? Go for the experience - and obviously leave my bike behind - or stay in a place I've come to like in the decade I've lived there (excepting some years in Calgary and, most recently, four semesters in Montréal just to be sure I didn't hate Boulder at all) and stick with the care-free thing?
You'll never regret trying it. You may spend the rest of your life wondering "what if?" if you don't go. Even hard/unpleasant experiences are worthwhile, IMO.

Don't die wondering.
 

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Fat'r + Slow'r than TMB
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It would be a no brainer if there weren't so many French people there.
 

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trying to HTFU...
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jupiterrn said:
It would be a no brainer if there weren't so many French people there.
that's what the Quebeqois say. ;-)

at least the riding opportunities will be primo...
 

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Paris IS AWESOME and I have never been treated so well as the couple times I have been in Paris. NOTHING wrong with the French as they are now very friendly to Americans and the city if PHENOMENAL. Don't listen to people that went there 10-15 years ago and say that everyone is rude to Americans. EVERY single person I met there (even strangers on the street) were friendly, respectful, and VERY VERY helpful (one guy even walked my wife and I three blocks to make sure we made it to the entrance to the underground train). The city is immaculate. GO GO GO GO GO GO GO!!!!
 

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Twitterpated
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jupiterrn said:
It would be a no brainer if there weren't so many French people there.
Excuse me, that's freedom people.

I would answer this questions, but I'm trying to decide if I should claim my $30 million lottery winnings.
 

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TheHeadlessThompsonGunner
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
MCF said:
Paris IS AWESOME and I have never been treated so well as the couple times I have been in Paris. NOTHING wrong with the French as they are now very friendly to Americans and the city if PHENOMENAL. Don't listen to people that went there 10-15 years ago and say that everyone is rude to Americans. EVERY single person I met there (even strangers on the street) were friendly, respectful, and VERY VERY helpful (one guy even walked my wife and I three blocks to make sure we made it to the entrance to the underground train). The city is immaculate. GO GO GO GO GO GO GO!!!!
Oh, I've been to Paris, and I like it. And I'm marrying (I hope...) into the French, so I can't say as I have any real problems with them. They're great, in fact. I'm just unsure of going to live in another freaking gigantic city... I've come to love the five-minutes-away mountains of Boulder. (And for the record, in all the ways Americans hate French people, people in Boulder are much, much worse than people in Paris.)
 

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TheHeadlessThompsonGunner
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
cwg_at_opc said:
that's what the Quebeqois say. ;-)
Have you ever been to Québec? They're the smuggest, snobbiest people I ever met - and they have no reason for either! They're socially ill-equipped and don't have anything that the rest of the world might envy, save asbestos mines and a two-bit revolutionary movement that's clinging to a colonial, settler-state culture that never existed, even in ye olde colonial times.
 

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How long do you have to go for? If less than a year, just go and enjoy.

Crepes, there just thin pancakes!!
 

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Devoid of all flim-flam
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Grab it. Do it. Don't delay.
 

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TheHeadlessThompsonGunner
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
terry b said:
You don't speak French but you're going to work in Paris teaching English?
Generally when one teaches a foreign language, that person speaks (and teaches) that foreign language. Any good language course, in fact, is monolingual. And I didn't write that I had no French - I said don't really. (Je le lis et je l'écris bien, en fait, mais je ne le parle pas bien...) Part of the motivation is to get more comfortable speaking French, for sure.

Another thing: I'll be sharing 21.5 sq. m.
 

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Take the job. A year in Paris will give you an international perspective that few Americans will ever have. That perspective could be valuable in your future employment. And Paris will be fun too.

TT
 

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eminence grease
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I asked because I've just gone through this as a student, in China.

The language school we contract to provide training to expats has a big corps of 20-something young women who are purported to be bilingual. Well, that's a bit of a stretch and in my experience what happens is that the process breaks down the moment that the student cannot rely on their native language to clear up a point of learning. The teacher sits there and stares with a dumb look on their face, the student gets frustrated and the learning process ends.

I'd argue that any good language course is not monolingual, rather that it's monolingual with at least a reasonable bilinguality when things get sticky. Rosetta Stone is a prime example of this, not a lick of English in a Mandarin course and the 200 or so people we're trying to get spun up for their assignment are walking away from it in droves.

Sorry I misinterpreted your statement "I don't really speak the language.
 

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TheHeadlessThompsonGunner
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
terry b said:
Sorry I misinterpreted your statement "I don't really speak the language.
No worries. And you're right on "points of learning." (And Rosetta Stone!) But I have grammar on my side: my English grammar is great (and historically, too: my Anglo-Saxon and middle Englishes are passable, with the latter borderline advanced, and I know all about where all the Frenchness of English originates from); and I've practically memorized Byrne and Churchill's (basically definitive) French-English grammar.

I am worried about my spoken French. I'm still WAY too self conscious about it. If things get ugly, I guess, I'll defer to Spanish, of which most of these students will probably have at least a cursory knowledge.
 

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Applesauce said:
.... And I'm going to apply for law schools in the fall, which might be made much more difficult by the distance.
It should not be any harder applying to law school if you spend a year in Paris than if you spent a year elsewhere. If you have not taken the LSAT yet, you can take it in Paris in September or December.

Everyone person that I know who has spent a year or two living in a foreign country has benefitted from it. Sometimes living in a different place can be difficult and it may not always be fun, but I don't think that you will regret it.

Bon chance.
 
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