Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a LeMond Zurich last Dec., with a stock Bontrager saddle. The bike is smooth as can be, but rides over 30 miles produce a sore butt. Sore butt seems to happen regardless of the bibs. To date I have ridden 2004 DeMarchi Contour, Assos FI.13, and some Performance Ultra and Elite bibs.

So I have $200 bucks to spend to try and get a less sore butt. I have been thinking about a Fizik Aliante saddle($199), or some new bibs, Castelli Y, Demarchi Contour plus PRO, maybe some Girodana. Problem of course is there are no guarantees either will fix the problem.

I am inclined to get the saddle, as I have some nice shorts and my butt still hurts. I am curious though. If the choice was yours, do you get the saddle or the shorts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
saddle, you already have some nice bibs. (assos, demarchi)

edit - i have a lemond tourmalet, got sore butt in rides over 25 miles with the stock bonti saddle. got a used slr xp (after trying one for 15 miles it was way more comfy) and haven't had a sore butt since. when i first got the saddle my nicest bibs are my team kit, made by louis garneau. most the time its pi attack (2 pairs). for indoor trainer i use a cheap pair of sugoi. i got a pair of castelli y from my dad (he wore them once, didnt fit him) and those things are amazing. ive been rotating them (castelli) in the pi and the team kit, and no problems at all. i ride about 150 miles a week, but i have exams next week and this week has been awful weather, so im down to about 2 or 3 rides of 30 or so miles. cant wait for summer when i can ride daily, im shooting for 200 miles a week by the end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Try a new saddle. The worlds best shorts/bibs will not fix a saddle that does not fit you. If the saddle fits, you can be comfy all day with average quality shorts. Unfortunately, it is very hard to say what saddle will work for you. Once you find the right one, make sure that no one gets their hands on it without prying it from your cold, dead fingers. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
AlexCad5 said:
Aliante or Carbon Arione should do the trick.
I have an Arione and think it is perfect for thinner, regular riders who like hill climbing. I would not recommend it for beginners or wide bodies.

Different saddles will fit different rear ends differently. Specialized dealers have some tools that help you to measure your rear end and those are worth a try. Another good method is to try sitting on all your friends' bikes and see what saddle feels the best to your rear end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
What I think

I did a search on this and other forums and read carefully every bit of advice I could find. First thing I learned is that you can make a lot of expensive mistakes if you do not apply clear logic and great care / patience in trying out each saddle and taking time to set it up. Second thing is don't listen to anyones opinion that a particular brand / model is the greatest : - it probably is for their butt (but) that dosen't mean it will do for you.
Two things matter most : What shape saddle suits you (example round or flat, one with /without a dip in the middle) and the width.
After those two points personal preference for the degree of "hardness" or padding of the saddle will probably take third consideration point. You'll see that most riders agree that a softer or more padded saddle will be comfortable for short spins but surprisingly its the opposite the further you ride. I saw one manufacturers site that they will say some of their range of saddles best suit riders doing up to X amount of miles per annum.
You will find many ideas as to how to measure your sit bones - double over a good towel and place it on a flat surface and then sit on it and then measure centre to centre the indents left in the towel from your sit bones. I personally put some play dough between two sheets of paper and sat on that - you get the idea. As long as you can shop for your saddle armed with the width and shape you require you won't make as many mistakes most of us did.
When you do try a saddle take your time setting it up and try and use a post with two bolts - this allows micro adjustment of tilt. If you haven't already realised - tilt angle affects saddles in a big way and tiny adjustments nose up or down really affect comfort.
Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,643 Posts
Longer stem.

Reach forward a little more and take some weight off your butt. It worked for me and now I can ride with almost any saddle and with any shorts that don't pinch. Get yourself balanced well on the bike and, magically, comfort happens.
 

·
Windrider (Stubborn)
Joined
·
22,029 Posts
Great response here.....

comsense said:
I did a search on this and other forums and read carefully every bit of advice I could find. First thing I learned is that you can make a lot of expensive mistakes if you do not apply clear logic and great care / patience in trying out each saddle and taking time to set it up. Second thing is don't listen to anyones opinion that a particular brand / model is the greatest : - it probably is for their butt (but) that dosen't mean it will do for you.
Two things matter most : What shape saddle suits you (example round or flat, one with /without a dip in the middle) and the width.
After those two points personal preference for the degree of "hardness" or padding of the saddle will probably take third consideration point. You'll see that most riders agree that a softer or more padded saddle will be comfortable for short spins but surprisingly its the opposite the further you ride. I saw one manufacturers site that they will say some of their range of saddles best suit riders doing up to X amount of miles per annum.
You will find many ideas as to how to measure your sit bones - double over a good towel and place it on a flat surface and then sit on it and then measure centre to centre the indents left in the towel from your sit bones. I personally put some play dough between two sheets of paper and sat on that - you get the idea. As long as you can shop for your saddle armed with the width and shape you require you won't make as many mistakes most of us did.
When you do try a saddle take your time setting it up and try and use a post with two bolts - this allows micro adjustment of tilt. If you haven't already realised - tilt angle affects saddles in a big way and tiny adjustments nose up or down really affect comfort.
Good luck.
A few years ago, I went on the quest for the perfect saddle. I went through about 10 saddles before I found what worked for me.

A few other thoughts:

- In your case, it's not the shorts. (based on the shorts you've tried
- Once you get a saddle, tilt does matter. Play a little bit.
- I always knew within 2-3 rides if it was going to work for me.
- Find an LBS with a "saddle basket" Most good LBS's have a basket or box of used seats that they let you borrow and return to try different seats......but if you do, at least buy one from that LBS in the end.
- Once you find one that works, buy more than one and put the extras away......as soon as you find one that works, it will be discontinued.

Len
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
Further to that most good LBSs will have something like a 30 day exchange policy on saddles or at least some sort of exchange period so if yours doesn't then try another.

Also remember some saddles come in different widths so make sure you get the right width to fit your sit bones, I was actually surprised that I was in the wider end of the spectrum (well for performance saddles at least at 143mm).
 

·
T.R., conservationist
Joined
·
239 Posts
Pinch

rusa1586 said:
Reach forward a little more and take some weight off your butt. It worked for me and now I can ride with almost any saddle and with any shorts that don't pinch. Get yourself balanced well on the bike and, magically, comfort happens.
I get the "pinch," too. What causes and what fixes?
Thanks,
Jerry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Don't think that because it's expensive that it will be comfortable. I learned that. I currently ride a WTB Speed V Comp on my Allez Sport. I know it's a mountain bike saddle but it's almost the same shape and length of the saddle that came on the bike. For my butt it's very comfortable. You can get one mail order for about thirty dollars which includes shipping. I am not saying it will work for you, just that saddles don't have to be expensive to be comfortable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
620 Posts
Try a Koobi...

...I'm short and wide, but I don't think it matters. I couldn't hack Selle Italia, Selle San Marco, or Bontrager. I have Koobi AU Enduro Gels on both road bikes (Litespeed Tuscany, Trek 5000) and they're great and have been since mile 1. If you have questions, call Koobi, and they'll work with you.

www.koobi.com
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top