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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Due to a lack of flexibility (despite daily foam roller and stretching for the last 2 years) and disproportionately long legs, I have a lot of spacers on my steerer tube (the maximum recommended by Cannondale). I'm wondering if it could be a good idea to get rid of a few spacers and use a riser handlebar to compensate, like this one :

https://www.specialized.com/ca/en/components/sworks-hover-carbon-handlebars/118173

I think it might improve the stiffness of the front end and make the whole thing a bit safer, by reducing the stress on the steerer. The bars don't look great, but so does a tower of spacers.

What do you guys think of this idea? It would be a permanent solution, as I would have to cut the steerer (can't run spacers above the stem).
 

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Huge in Japan
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Presuming that this is not a condition that can be remedied through a bike fit over all but a malady that handlebar geometry can address then you shouldn't have to go carbon. Velo Orange has a handlebar that explores this and no doubt others do as well but honestly if you have body flexibility/mobility issues to mitigate here it is probably not going to be solved by handlebars but if it is in fact something that can be remedied by bars then look around, you don't have to go carbon (unless you want to).
 

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I don't think you would change the stress on the steerer tube by very much. The lever arm distances would be the same, your changing the location of the stress. But then if you cut off your stem, I would think you are increasing the stress at that location.

Some steerer tubes require a top spacer over the stem.
 

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As long as you are not exceeding the spacer stack outlined by the manufacturer I'd keep them in and stay with the bar and stem you have. But then I also wear socks with sandals..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Presuming that this is not a condition that can be remedied through a bike fit over all but a malady that handlebar geometry can address then you shouldn't have to go carbon. Velo Orange has a handlebar that explores this and no doubt others do as well but honestly if you have body flexibility/mobility issues to mitigate here it is probably not going to be solved by handlebars but if it is in fact something that can be remedied by bars then look around, you don't have to go carbon (unless you want to).
Carbon is not the point here. In fact, I made a copy paste mistake, I wanted to point to the alloy version. I don't want carbon handlebars
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't think you would change the stress on the steerer tube by very much. The lever arm distances would be the same, your changing the location of the stress. But then if you cut off your stem, I would think you are increasing the stress at that location.

Some steerer tubes require a top spacer over the stem.
Good point about the lever arm distance . But I'm wondering if the different shape could disperse some of the force. And the stress on the steerer would indeed be moved, but in a place where it's stiffer and more robust, since it would be closer to the fork.
Cannondale have a different system, they especially state in theirs manuals that you can't have a spacer above the stem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
As long as you are not exceeding the spacer stack outlined by the manufacturer I'd keep them in and stay with the bar and stem you have. But then I also wear socks with sandals..
That would probably be the best thing to do. I guess the manufacturer protects itself more than not and consider the heavier, more powerful rider when they give a max stack recommandation. Since I'm only 140 lbs, I guess I'm pretty far from the actual material limit.
 

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Huge in Japan
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Carbon is not the point here. In fact, I made a copy paste mistake, I wanted to point to the alloy version. I don't want carbon handlebars
Ok good to know, I was thinking that you were inclined toward that bar specifically. None the less as we both know there are riser style options out there, and speaking strictly in terms of aesthetics I personally like the looks of a riser over spacers. But this is just me, it's simply a matter of taste. I do not believe that you will experience a different feel nor compromise the integrity of the joint by running a stack of spacers that does the same as a riser. Base your decision on what you think looks best.
 

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Due to a lack of flexibility (despite daily foam roller and stretching for the last 2 years) and disproportionately long legs, I have a lot of spacers on my steerer tube (the maximum recommended by Cannondale). I'm wondering if it could be a good idea to get rid of a few spacers and use a riser handlebar to compensate, like this one :

https://www.specialized.com/ca/en/components/sworks-hover-carbon-handlebars/118173

I think it might improve the stiffness of the front end and make the whole thing a bit safer, by reducing the stress on the steerer. The bars don't look great, but so does a tower of spacers.

What do you guys think of this idea? It would be a permanent solution, as I would have to cut the steerer (can't run spacers above the stem).
You dont say what stem you are using but the simplest option IMO is a stem with more rise
 
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