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had it in the ear before
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Reading lots of info online about growing a vegetable garden in Florida and one thing i've noticed on numerous sites is an interval between plowing and planting, most recommend a span of 3 weeks. I am very impatient and want to plant the seeds now but I've only tilled the ground 2 days ago and mixed in compost at that time. What will happen if I don't wait the suggested 3 weeks to plant? We are getting good soaking rain this week and I want to take advantage.
 

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gutfiddle said:
Reading lots of info online about growing a vegetable garden in Florida and one thing i've noticed on numerous sites is an interval between plowing and planting, most recommend a span of 3 weeks. I am very impatient and want to plant the seeds now but I've only tilled the ground 2 days ago and mixed in compost at that time. What will happen if I don't wait the suggested 3 weeks to plant? We are getting good soaking rain this week and I want to take advantage.
Bugs and weeds.
 

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gutfiddle said:
Reading lots of info online about growing a vegetable garden in Florida and one thing i've noticed on numerous sites is an interval between plowing and planting, most recommend a span of 3 weeks. I am very impatient and want to plant the seeds now but I've only tilled the ground 2 days ago and mixed in compost at that time. What will happen if I don't wait the suggested 3 weeks to plant? We are getting good soaking rain this week and I want to take advantage.
I don't know nothin' about Florida dirt, but here in Nevada, the soil is very low in organics, fairly sandy. Water runs right through it and it's low in nutrients. Mixing in the amendments provides stuff to absorb and hold water so the plants can get at it, and waiting awhile before you plant lets the bacteria work and start breaking things down.
Having said that, I've planted right after tilling many times, probably more often than not, without much trouble. The bacterial breakdown takes nitrogen, so you might add a little extra fertilizer just in case.
At least that works at 5000 feet in the Sierra Nevada. I can't speak for the lowland Floridian muck, but if you call your county extension agent or ask at a nursery, they'll be able to tell you.
You get RAIN in your garden? Here in the West, we rarely see a drop between April and November. Everything, everything has to be irrigated a couple of times a week
 

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I say plant it!!! Don't give the weeds a chance to get a head start on you Vegetable plants.

600 acre farmer in California - But don't know nothing about Florida
 

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you don't need to wait, but if this is a newly prepared garden bed that was recently lawn, then waiting will allow you to get rid of the weeds and grass that will most likely spring back up before seeding.

whatever you decide to do, resist the urge to plant in the rain, or just before a long string of storms. new seeds are prone to rot if the soil is too saturated, and many others will be unearthed by the rain and ruined. a few days of soaking rain is great for established plants, not so much for seeds.
 

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had it in the ear before
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks for the tips! The soil on this sandy ridge has good drainage and i've mixed some compost and built my rows. Looks like a thunderstorm brewing this afternoon but tommorrow the chance for rain is small so maybe this evening i'll put my seeds in the ground. Fenced it off w/ chicken wire so the dogs will leave it alone but i'm gonna have to build a scarecrow cause the sunflowers will be too tempting for crows and squirrels, looking into on of those motion sensor sprinklers too. I'm planting cucumbers, roma tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, okra, pole beans, fordhook lima beans, eggplant, bell peppers, jalepeno peppers, crook neck squash, sunflowers along the backside of the plot, rosemary and basil. I'm planting the sweet pepper and hot pepper on opposing sides to hopefully avoid cross pollination and I might get a box of bees nearby to encourage pollenation. I can't wait to harvest some fresh cheap veggies!
 

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Sticky Valentine
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I want a garden :(

My grandpa had a vegetable garden when I was growing up, as well as a couple of fruit trees (apricot, plum, blood orange, lemon, fig, loquat). I always loved working in it when I was a kid and I've always wanted my own.


joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
JoeDaddio said:
I want a garden :(

My grandpa had a vegetable garden when I was growing up, as well as a couple of fruit trees (apricot, plum, blood orange, lemon, fig, loquat). I always loved working in it when I was a kid and I've always wanted my own.


joe
i've always wanted to grow my own too and fortunately my wife's house is on an acre of land which gives me plenty of room for a garden and inflatable pool and beatup truck and dog kennel. We also have a massive pink grapefruit tree that puts off good fruit if you mix it w/ vodka but citrus trees sure are a mess.
 

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Mehpic
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yes, but there is nothing quite like the smell of citrus on a warm night.

if you don't plant immediately, the benefit of leaving the soil worked but not planted is so that you have the time to pull any weeds
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
2cflyr said:
yes, but there is nothing quite like the smell of citrus on a warm night.

if you don't plant immediately, the benefit of leaving the soil worked but not planted is so that you have the time to pull any weeds
the orange blossoms are very nice right now.

i see what you mean about the weeds, i just pulled a bunch while forming the rows.
 

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Call Chuck Bailey and ask him..... he knows a little about farming in FL. If that fails, call the County Extension office in Polk County and ask to speak to a Master Gardener, they are voluteers who answer these sorts of questions all the time. Good Luck with your garden and hope the Veggies don't glow in the dark from growing in that rich Mulberry soil.
 

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gutfiddle said:
I'm planting cucumbers, roma tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, okra, pole beans, fordhook lima beans, eggplant, bell peppers, jalepeno peppers, crook neck squash, sunflowers along the backside of the plot, rosemary and basil.
Dang - you're planting that all at once?? Here in the "maritime" PacNW I couldn't dream of putting in peppers or eggplant for a month or two, so I'll be starting them and a few herbs in the basement this weekend. The tomatoes I started indoors a couple months ago will go in the ground this weekend, but under a plastic tunnel, as well as some chitted seed potatoes. With no freezes in the forecast from now until our usual last freeze date of 4/15 I just removed the plastic tunnels over the lettuce, beets, chard, arugula, spinach, broccoli, snow peas, carrots & radishes. The asparagus seedlings remain under cover. The uncovered garlic over-wintered fine through several snows (except the Romanian Red, which is finally at least peeking out of the ground).

As for the 3 week rule, I'm not sure what that's about. There's no such rule of thumb around here that I've seen. I'd think that 3 weeks wouldn't be long enough for any weed seeds to necessarily sprout. They'll be sprouting all season long. The 3 weeks might relate to allowing any significant amounts of plant material that you tilled-in to break-down a bit before seeding... but absent that, I can't think of a reason to wait.
 

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Mehpic
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gutfiddle said:
the orange blossoms are very nice right now.

i see what you mean about the weeds, i just pulled a bunch while forming the rows.
i'm jealous about the blossom smell- growing up in orange county (ca) it was a definite sign of spring. not so much anymore- i don't think that there are any decent sized groves anymore.

when we plant veggies we usually till the soil, hit it with round up, and let it sit for about 3 weeks. that usually kills all the bad stuff off. at that point, we ammend again and plant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
cdhbrad said:
Call Chuck Bailey and ask him..... he knows a little about farming in FL. If that fails, call the County Extension office in Polk County and ask to speak to a Master Gardener, they are voluteers who answer these sorts of questions all the time. Good Luck with your garden and hope the Veggies don't glow in the dark from growing in that rich Mulberry soil.
whew boy Chuck is on my dad's poop list, he sprayed and killed a bunch of strawberry's dead on the vine w/out lettin him know. I didnt realize we had a "master gardener" but i'm gonna look him up and give him some competition:thumbsup:

a little radiation never hurt anybody, if the radon gas level is low enough to live on then it should be safe to grow food in the ground right:eek:
 

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PdxMark said:
Dang - you're planting that all at once?? Here in the "maritime" PacNW I couldn't dream of putting in peppers or eggplant for a month or two, so I'll be starting them and a few herbs in the basement this weekend. The tomatoes I started indoors a couple months ago will go in the ground this weekend, but under a plastic tunnel, as well as some chitted seed potatoes. With no freezes in the forecast from now until our usual last freeze date of 4/15 I just removed the plastic tunnels over the lettuce, beets, chard, arugula, spinach, broccoli, snow peas, carrots & radishes. The asparagus seedlings remain under cover. The uncovered garlic over-wintered fine through several snows (except the Romanian Red, which is finally at least peeking out of the ground).

As for the 3 week rule, I'm not sure what that's about. There's no such rule of thumb around here that I've seen. I'd think that 3 weeks wouldn't be long enough for any weed seeds to necessarily sprout. They'll be sprouting all season long. The 3 weeks might relate to allowing any significant amounts of plant material that you tilled-in to break-down a bit before seeding... but absent that, I can't think of a reason to wait.
i thought about starting the seeds inside and transplanting them after germination but the forecast for the next 10 days in high 80's w/ afternoon showers so they're all goin in the ground at once. I'm gonna try and stay on top of the weeds by getting the kids out there pulling them with me and they are gonna help me build a scarecrow tommorrow against their momma's will, she's scared of scarecrows:(
 

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Guess your Dad should have picked a few berries before Chuck decided to spray the vines. My father always had a garden when I was growing up and it never hurt me. Have fun with the garden.
 

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If you mulch between the rows, and under the plants as much as practical, your weeds will be significantly less of a problem. Be careful if mulching with fresh grass clippings, they can get hot enough to damage young plants.
It's been raining so much here that we have only been able to plant a few potatoes, peas and onions.
 

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Plant em if you got em.
 

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PdxMark said:
Dang - you're planting that all at once?? Here in the "maritime" PacNW I couldn't dream of putting in peppers or eggplant for a month or two...
What plant hardiness zone are you in?

I'm guessing gutfiddle is in zone 10a. My area was reclassified from 9a to 9b, thanks to climate changes. Our start of the season is quite a bit earlier than in more northern latitudes/zones.
 

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Gut, as for the "Spade or plow the plot at least three weeks before planting" ref. article, I believe they are coming from the situation where you need to let tilled manure and fertilizers break down instead of burning the young plants. Depending on the level of breakdown in the compost you used, you should be able to get away with planting this week if you didn't use too much fresh manure or any strong fertilizers.

We're putting in a few 8' x 24' kidney shaped beds in the sunny part of the yard that will mix fruit trees and bushes with some decorative annuals. While the yard is fairly large, we havta' make the beds run double duty since it is also our view and not just for produce. We'll also put in a partial shade tropical bed. I'll poast before and after pixxors in a few months.

Finally, those 2 years in FFA 30 years ago are startin' to pay off! LMAO
Actually, Mrs. Tig is the super green thumb, and I'm Emanuel Labor.
 
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