Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,808 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's a partial quote from the cyclingnews.com story on the release of the Spanish doping report: "The names at the centre of the affair, which is being treated as a crime against public health, as Spain hasn't got its anti-doping law in place yet . . . ."

Why should the absence of a law against doping interfere with a doping investigation, when you can just "treat" it as a crime against public health? Well, I haven't read the applicable statutes, so I won't make assumptions, but boy is that a strange statement to make in a news story and leave unexplained. Curiouser and curiouser.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
I didn't read anywhere that it was "interfering" with the investigation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,808 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, that's sorta my point. Doesn't it seem a little strange that Spain is conducting a criminal investigation into doping when it doesn't have an anti-doping law? If they're going to treat it as a crime against public health, the criminal would seem to be the persons providing the treatment that threatens public health, not the members of the public--i.e., the riders--getting the treatment. As I say, I don't know the laws under which the police are proceeding, but if the crime being investigated here is a crime against public health, it seems like a fair question to ask why from all appearances the riders, rather than just the doctors and other treatment providers/procurers, are being targeted.
 

·
Call me a Fred
Joined
·
17,025 Posts
harlond said:
Well, that's sorta my point. Doesn't it seem a little strange that Spain is conducting a criminal investigation into doping when it doesn't have an anti-doping law? If they're going to treat it as a crime against public health, the criminal would seem to be the persons providing the treatment that threatens public health, not the members of the public--i.e., the riders--getting the treatment. As I say, I don't know the laws under which the police are proceeding, but if the crime being investigated here is a crime against public health, it seems like a fair question to ask why from all appearances the riders, rather than just the doctors and other treatment providers/procurers, are being targeted.
Riders have not been arrested, just doctors and/or staff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
You can't prove the Doctors were a hazard to public health unless you can prove they dispensed harmful drugs or harmful treatment to their patients. So the riders are the evidence - if they can prove that riders were given harmful drugs/treatment, they can prove thier case against the Doctors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,808 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ChilliConCarnage said:
You can't prove the Doctors were a hazard to public health unless you can prove they dispensed harmful drugs or harmful treatment to their patients. So the riders are the evidence - if they can prove that riders were given harmful drugs/treatment, they can prove thier case against the Doctors.
And what part of that requires the Spanish authorities to help ruin the careers of their witnesses? You don't see that as a somewhat odd aspect of the criminal investigation into a crime against public health?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
harlond said:
And what part of that requires the Spanish authorities to help ruin the careers of their witnesses? You don't see that as a somewhat odd aspect of the criminal investigation into a crime against public health?
Well, I think this case certainly differs from a typical "crime against public health" in that the patients are also participants, they understand and know the health risks involved and search out the Doctor to receive the treatment, making them complicit in the illegal activity. A typical "crime against public health" might refer to a case such as a water treatment plant that knowingly dispenses improperly treated water to an unknowing public. It's the same mindset in the U.S. war against drugs - the drug abuser is sentenced as severely (or more severly in some cases) as the drug seller.

But I think there is also the feeling that with the doping laws coming, since these athletes are using these treatments to cheat, there is no concern for the affect on their careers - or, rather, that it is implicitly hoped that their careers will be affected in lieu of legal punishment, or until such legal punishment can be metted out.

Ethically speaking, I would agree with that. If somebody is cheating, just because there is no specific ant-doping law on the books yet doesn't mean that I would go out of my way to help protect the career of the cheater.

My hope is that this does turn out to be a big affair, that any rider who can be proven to have availed themselves of this service gets their two year suspension, and that it creates a negative reinforcement against doping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
The worst aspect of cheating, in my opinion, is not the competitive inequality, but the fact that a clean rider can't win without suspicion. Just imagine if Lance was absolutely clean - never doped in his entire carer just as he claims - it's all the cheaters in the peloton that have ruined the reputation of the sport, and by extension, it's champion. So in the public's opinion it doesn't matter if he cheated or not, but that he was the leader of a dirty sport.

Cheaters suck. If it were not for the hazy science that make up the current doping test regimen, I would be all for a lifetime ban on any and all cheaters that were caught.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top