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Hi, I have a Specialized Roubaix 2017and have 2 questions please.
1) is there a noticeable difference in speed performance in the bike with the different springs, I.e is there a loss of power conversion when using softer springs?
2) my stem boot is torn and replacements are hard to come by, any suggestions for an alternative please?
Thanks
 

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Hi, I have a Specialized Roubaix 2017and have 2 questions please.
1) is there a noticeable difference in speed performance in the bike with the different springs, I.e is there a loss of power conversion when using softer springs?
2) my stem boot is torn and replacements are hard to come by, any suggestions for an alternative please?
Thanks
Well, I've always gone by the materials in the frame to be the main shock absorption, but I'd guess a springier elastomer might steal some energy on the heaviest downstrokes, but what do I know?

If you can't find a replacement stem boot, maybe replace the whole stem? Easy to install and relatively cheap.
 

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Well, I've always gone by the materials in the frame to be the main shock absorption.............
Really? I've always used my tires as the main shock absorption.
 
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Well, I've always gone by the materials in the frame to be the main shock absorption... but what do I know?
In this case, you know something that is completely wrong.... Unless you are riding a bike frame made of soft rubber...
 

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In this case, you know something that is completely wrong.... Unless you are riding a bike frame made of soft rubber...
Ok, ok. You're thinking is stuck in the box.

I'm referring to timeless butted steel, 1" diameter tubing, 1 and 1/8" down tubes. Road buzz that makes it past the tires gets dutifully absorbed along those nice, skinny tubes. You finish the century wrists and butt still in reasonably good shape.

Remember how everyone complained when Cannondale came out with these aluminum frames with ugly fat tubing so they wouldn't eventually crack from too little "modulus of elasticity?" Probably not.

Notice how frame builders are going from these funky elastomers at the seat post junction to skinnier and skinner tubing, principally the seat stays, but also the top tube and down tube? That's to soak up vibes and give a comfortable ride. Amazing. They're all doing it! Pencil skinny seat stays don't lose structural integrity like elastomers are doing. I've always felt the bumps more harshly on a fat tubed bike than on a skinny tubed bike. The skinnier the tire, the more obvious that becomes. Carbon builders have been trying to solve that problem for 30 years, and steel still has market share. Why is that?

Big bumps get handled very well with the arms and legs if you're doing it right. Froome will probably tell you nobody needs shock absorbers on a light weight road bike. Yes, the tires are the first line of defense, but the frame makes a big difference noticeable after an afternoon in the saddle.
 

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Ok, ok. You're [sic] thinking is stuck in the box.

...Yes, the tires are the first line of defense, but the frame makes a big difference noticeable after an afternoon in the saddle.
OMG, just own your earlier misstatement, instead of trying to tell others why they're "stuck in the box."

The topic of the thread, and the original questions asked, aren't related to any steel fetish leanings you may have.🤨
 
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Well, excuse me. We're parsing future shocks, correct? I"m saying these elastomers so far haven't turned out to be as strong or reliable as the choice of frame tubing. Riders are apparently having problems with them. Finx can state his case arguing against my opinion, but he can't outright dismiss it, as "completely wrong." Those are fighting words, comrade!

;0
 

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Well, excuse me. We're parsing future shocks, correct? I"m saying these elastomers so far haven't turned out to be as strong or reliable as the choice of frame tubing. Riders are apparently having problems with them. Finx can state his case arguing against my opinion, but he can't outright dismiss it, as "completely wrong." Those are fighting words, comrade!

;0
Excuse noted, along with thread drift. Please stick to the topic.

You are completely wrong. "Stuck in the box," in your parlance.

Here are the questions asked by the OP:

1) is there a noticeable difference in speed performance in the bike with the different springs, I.e is there a loss of power conversion when using softer springs?

2) my stem boot is torn and replacements are hard to come by, any suggestions for an alternative please?

Post answers if you have any that aren't self-indulgent nostalgia trips of irrelevancy.🤔
 

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Excuse noted, along with thread drift. Please stick to the topic.

You are completely wrong. "Stuck in the box," in your parlance.

Here are the questions asked by the OP:

1) is there a noticeable difference in speed performance in the bike with the different springs, I.e is there a loss of power conversion when using softer springs?

2) my stem boot is torn and replacements are hard to come by, any suggestions for an alternative please?

Post answers if you have any that aren't self-indulgent nostalgia trips of irrelevancy.🤔
Alright, I did get stuck in a box! Is OP referring to a spring on the stem inside the head tube? Mountain bikers usually stiffen up their fork shocks on pavement for faster response. If the bike bounces up and down, I'd think that would detract from speed, unless you're technique is flawless.
 

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carbon fiber makes frames too stiff, aging riders complain ride too rought, then manufacturers make bigger tires, ride still too rought, but old riders not willing to go 2.3" mtb tires, so manufactuers put in elastomer gummy bear in frame to soften ride, and not gummy bear shock absober is breaking.... it's like we're going in circle.. good selling strategy for manufacturers, time to sell the bike this bike has flaws..and get a steel or ti bike.
 

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No way a steel or ti bike is going to have shock absorption as a specialized. Steel rusts, ti is expensive, they all have baggage.

as a side note: why does a 't' sound like an 's', is that english taught in school?
 

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Do drive a car? It has 'steel' springs. Even without dampening, a spring is better than a solid to the frame axle.
 

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Shocks are made of steel. Ever drive a car without any springs?
... anyway, what about an 's' sounding 't', how about that?
 

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After re-reading your post, it appears you are agreeing with me.
But, the suspension does not have to dampen to suppress shock. Dampening was only added after the wheels started oscillating off the ground, for ever!
 

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A spring isn't a damper. Did you ever drive a car with no shocks?
Or with totally worn shocks? Yes, it was like riding a horse.
 
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