Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

21 - 24 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,389 Posts
carbon fiber makes frames too stiff, aging riders complain ride too rought, then manufacturers make bigger tires, ride still too rought, but old riders not willing to go 2.3" mtb tires, so manufactuers put in elastomer gummy bear in frame to soften ride, and not gummy bear shock absober is breaking.... it's like we're going in circle.. good selling strategy for manufacturers, time to sell the bike this bike has flaws..and get a steel or ti bike.
So true. Plastic does not last, period. It goes brittle and cracks. Steel alloys last forever. Just put some kind of rust repellant in the main tubes when servicing the threaded BB, and it will last forever. Rear tire pumps up water into the seat tube riding in the rain. I've seen guys turn the bikes upside down and watch the road grime pour out of the bottom brackets. Old cheap, low grade "high tensile" steel bikes rusted at the joints from bad brazing and poor painting. CRMO is so dense, it doesn't quickly rust.

Well, beefing up the tires just makes the bike heavier, less responsive, harder to climb, and that can ruin the experience. So yeah, old guys prefer to skate along on 25s or the nice lightweight 28s tires, absorb shocks without giving up road feel, perfectly tuned to that old high modulus steel road bike that won't start to let you down at mile 70 of a century. I think steel uniquely establishes an intimate feedback loop with the rider. Flex the frame and it springs back quickly and faithfully to the next round. Bike disappears beneath the rider, becomes an extension of his body, responds faithfully to his wishes. On a good day, that's what it's all about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,740 Posts
So true. Plastic does not last, period. It goes brittle and cracks. Steel alloys last forever. Just put some kind of rust repellant in the main tubes when servicing the threaded BB, and it will last forever. Rear tire pumps up water into the seat tube riding in the rain. I've seen guys turn the bikes upside down and watch the road grime pour out of the bottom brackets. Old cheap, low grade "high tensile" steel bikes rusted at the joints from bad brazing and poor painting. CRMO is so dense, it doesn't quickly rust.

Well, beefing up the tires just makes the bike heavier, less responsive, harder to climb, and that can ruin the experience. So yeah, old guys prefer to skate along on 25s or the nice lightweight 28s tires, absorb shocks without giving up road feel, perfectly tuned to that old high modulus steel road bike that won't start to let you down at mile 70 of a century. I think steel uniquely establishes an intimate feedback loop with the rider. Flex the frame and it springs back quickly and faithfully to the next round. Bike disappears beneath the rider, becomes an extension of his body, responds faithfully to his wishes. On a good day, that's what it's all about.
I know a lot of people read you out as an old timer and a retrogrouch, but I see the light. You're in socal, so am I, and we've all seen all the latest and greatest carbon bikes from the riders here. And I agree with you, metal frames still rider better than carbon ones. My metal frames are modern ti and stainless, compared to top end carbon it they weigh 1 lb more, big f'ing deal I'm not racing when I ride them. I used to have all these lightweight carbon frames from the big brands Specialized, Pinarello, Cdale, got rid of them all except for one that I use for racing. Everything else is either ti or stainless now. And no i'm not somebody in his 60s, or 50s, or even 40s yet. I like expensive toys and bling out bikes, and riding a quality ti or stainless bike underneath you feel like riding a Rolls Royceeeee
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Hi, I have a Specialized Roubaix 2017and have 2 questions please.
1) is there a noticeable difference in speed performance in the bike with the different springs, I.e is there a loss of power conversion when using softer springs?
2) my stem boot is torn and replacements are hard to come by, any suggestions for an alternative please?
Thanks
I have a 2020 Roubaix Expert with the Gen 2 hydraulic future shock. I do not notice a tremendous difference in power when I have it adjusted from softest to hardest setting. It’s never fully locked out. I tend to keep it set pretty firm unless the roads are extremely rough. I will say on a test ride of lower level Roubaix with the spring based future shock I did not care for the softness when standing but it may have had the softest spring from the factory.

The rubber boots are the weak link in the system for me. I split two in 5000 miles last year and probably will have another at about 2000 miles pretty soon. I picked up a couple of spare smooth boots in anticipation of this. I did see a post on FB Roubaix group of a owner using a piece of inner tube 1-3/4 or 1-7/8 I think and a zip tie at the top as a substitute, it looked good. Of note I’m not certain this will work on your Gen 1 shock as it doesn’t have the smooth boot.
 
21 - 24 of 24 Posts
Top