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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a Specialized Hardrock GX for $60, its in pretty good condition but currently not riding. I was thinking about making it a single speed and putting some slicks on there. Ill use it mainly for commuting, about 10 miles each way. My questions are how much would this cost me? Is it something i could do myself or would i best off taking it to my local bike shop? Im fairly new at this and have little to no clue. But I dont want to be ripped off. I really like the looks of the bike and the idea of a low maintenance bike and ive heard decent things about the bike as well. Just looking to get a general picture if not more.

Any help and advice is greatly appreciated.


Thank You.
 

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Steve Zissou said:
I recently bought a Specialized Hardrock GX for $60, its in pretty good condition but currently not riding. I was thinking about making it a single speed and putting some slicks on there. Ill use it mainly for commuting, about 10 miles each way. My questions are how much would this cost me? Is it something i could do myself or would i best off taking it to my local bike shop? Im fairly new at this and have little to no clue. But I dont want to be ripped off. I really like the looks of the bike and the idea of a low maintenance bike and ive heard decent things about the bike as well. Just looking to get a general picture if not more.

Any help and advice is greatly appreciated.


Thank You.

With the single speed conversion kit from Nashbar or Performance bike and some short stack chainring bolt(allows one ring up from), you can spend as little as $30-$35 for the conversion.
 

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huvia ja hyötyä
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You'll need to be able to remove the rear cassette (is the bike new enough to use cassette cogs) and the extra chainrings. Adding a new chainring and chain would also be a good idea if the current parts are worn.
 

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I converted my old Hardrock to single speed and rode it all fall, while I built up my fixed gear. It's a pretty heavy bike to commute on, but it's bulletproof.

The conversion is pretty easy, but you may need to buy some tools as well as the single-speed kit. Cassette remover and chain whip spring to mind.
 

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I SS'd a Hardrock. It was fun. Here's what you need: a freewheel remover; chain whip; wrench for freewheel remover; BMX freewheel; short chainring bolts; allen key to remove old chainring bolts and install new bolts; may need new chain. I'd imagine you could get this all done at a shop for, say, fifty bucks if you didn't want to do it yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sounds like a great project.
Id like to try this on a bike im not so reliant at the moment.
I think ill take it to my shop and hopefully the guy will have the patience to educate me a bit or perhaps ill have him do it.

But please tell me more, i might just get the courage to try it myself.
 

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It really isn't all that complicated, assuming you have a cassette hub and the chainrings are bolted onto the cranks (not riveted or otherwise permanently fixed).

When I did my conversion, I did not have the tools for removing the cassette and chainrings, so I took the bike to the shop, after removing derailers, cables and shifters.

When putting it together, you need to set up the rear cog and spacers so that the chain runs in a straight line, not side to side. Then you have chain length and tensioning. Chain length depends on how long your seat stays are and what chainring and cog you have. I had to use a half link in the chain to get chain length close enough for the tensioner that I am using.
 
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