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What the what???
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey folks,

What started out as a review of the 2009 Scott Speedster S30 I purchased last year has grown to include a number of different contributors with a variety of different models of Scott road bike. So, I thought it would be beneficial to start a new thread to reflect that expansion. If you've got a Scott road bike and your looking to share your experience, ask questions, post pics...this is a place for you.
 

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What the what???
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
As if I needed a reason...

to love my wife.

My Speedster has been up on blocks awaiting some new tires to replace the Hutchinson Equinox tires that came standard with the bike. My wife decided an early Father's Day present was in order. I found a really good deal on some 25c Michelin Krylions for $39.

But wait, there's more! The Ritchey adjustable stem I've had on the bike had done its job. I knew I needed a high angle stem. I had been looking at a Bontrager stem with a 40 degree angle that came in white and was hoping to maybe get it at Christmas. My wife knew I wanted it and ordered it without telling me. So, Christmas came early for me this year.

I put both the tires and the stem on the bike and managed to get in a 53 mile ride yesterday. The ubiquitous pic in front of the garage door is included below.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Tires and stem

The Krylions are 25s. From a number of threads I've read around here about 23s vs. 25s I was hopeful that the 25s would make for a smoother ride. I wouldn't have expected to make as drastic a change as it seems to have, though. They not only smooth out the feel of small bumps and uneven payment, they smooth out the sound as well.

The stem is a Bontrager Race (105mm 40 degree). It comes pretty close to matching the angle and reach I had achieved with the Ritchey adjustable stem. If anything, it seems to have elevated the bars a little higher and brought them back a bit more than the Ritchey. My position on the bike is, therefore, more upright (saddle is level, bar tops are level, and the saddle is almost level with the bars) and the drops are more comfortable for longer stretches. More on that as I get some more miles in on the bike.

With the possible exception of a saddle at some point, these recent changes to the bike mark the last changes I plan to make unless something on the bike fails. Therefore, it might be a good time to do a quick recap of the changes I have made from the original 2009 Speedster S30.

Brake pads: Kool Stop salmon
Tires: Michelin Krylion 25c
Tubes: Michelin AirStop
Seat Post: Sette APX zero setback
Cages: Bontrager composite
Computer: Cateye Micro Wireless
Stem: Bontrager Race 105mm 40 degree
Bar Tape: Profile Design
Pedals: VP Beartraps
Saddle: Terry Cite Y
Crankset: SRAM GXP
FD Cable: Jagwire Basic
 

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In addition to being brilliant ladies our wives may have a great deal in common (with possible exception of my wife's taste in men, for which I am grateful). I still remember her encouragement to buy the Addict last year, despite my not having a job at the time. :eek:

It was a wise choice that I could not make by myself. Your new stem appears to be a similarly excellent choice! :thumbsup:



By the way, in this view you can see the gray and black version of the WTB Laser V Team saddle that I find so comfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. Twenty-one years and she still surprises me.

That saddle does look comfortable and, of course, the rest of your bike looks fantastic.
 

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Opus51569 said:
Aside from the tires and saddle, have you made any other changes to it?
Not much. A significantly quieter, smoother shifting, Dura-Ace chain replaced the SRAM original when it wore out. A carbon seat post with an easier-to-adjust, two-bolt clamp helped perfect saddle placement. You already know about that trick with your new post. :cool:

I tried a set of amazingly responsive Neuvation Aero wheels with Continental Supersonic tires that ended up on my wife’s bike. She says she won’t give them back. I’m too heavy for those racing tires anyway . . . so, a set of Mavic Ksyrium Elite wheels from Craig’s List replaced the heavier Ksyrium Equipe originals for me. They are "so not aero" but I haven’t won any lottery drawings . . . they will do. :D

Thanks for asking and reminding me how lucky I am. :thumbsup:
 

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TucsonMTB said:
Aw, shucks . . . Thanks! :blush2:
Hey why don't you two go out on a date or something!

Both bikes look great but what is up with that ****** stem? Do you have a bad back or something?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just more comfortable with the bars and saddle at roughly the same height. If you have a pic of your Scott, feel free to post it up. I promise not to say anything complimentary, for fear of it being misinterpreted...
 

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Haha, I see. I ride occasionally with an older lady who has a stem setup like that, and let me tell you, somedays it's all I can do to keep up with her on 20mph rides, her stamina just doesn't give out. But anyway, no pic of my bike will be on this thread, I'm a bike snob, I ride a Look, and yes, it does actually garner some glances when I pull into the popular bikers rest stop, aka the local Starbucks. But there might be a picture in my future, my wife might be the owner of a Scott CR-1 by the end of the year. She's going to try out an Orbea and a Pinarello very soon, but I think that price will lead her to the Scott.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Then I will keep an eye out for a pic and ride reports if she decides to go with the CR-1, though I have to admit Orbeas and Pinarellos are tough competition. For me it was an easier decision since I knew I was going the aluminum route and had a pretty limited budget.
 

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Been a lurker her for a while... but felt compelled to post a picture of my new ride. :)



2010 CR1 Team with some hand built Deep V's laced to Ultegra hubs. Litterally just picked it up from the LBS an hour or so ago and haven't even had a chance to get out there with it yet. Lots of prep still to do... fit the bottle cages/cycling computer, etc. but I'm pumped.

This will be/is my first "real" dedicated road bike. Been a long time mountain biker that had to give it up because of a back injury (non-related). Sold the mt. bike and then purchased a Cannondale Bad Boy as a hybrid/fitness bike. Got completely borred with that in less than a year and sold it.

All winter long I had been itching to get back into cycling and I'm not sure what the straw that broke the camel's back was, but one day I just picked up the phone and made a fitting apt. Now a few short weeks later here I am. :D

Anyway.. Hello. I hope to learn a lot from everyone!
 

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FeydR said:
This will be/is my first "real" dedicated road bike. Been a long time mountain biker that had to give it up because of a back injury (non-related). Sold the mt. bike and then purchased a Cannondale Bad Boy as a hybrid/fitness bike. Got completely borred with that in less than a year and sold it.

Anyway.. Hello. I hope to learn a lot from everyone!
Nice! I predict good things for you. :D

Despite many years of old-school road riding, including USCF competition, 25 years ago; my transition to modern technology is similar to yours. 7 years of mountain biking exclusively here in Arizona tapered off abruptly when my wife broke both a tibia and her clavicle on a rocky descent. Skinny road tires on my Cannondale Scalpel followed, but you can only be dropped so many times running out of gears on your 44x12 top end before the "need" for a real road bike becomes overwhelming. :rolleyes: Luckily, that corresponded with great deals last year on closeout Scott's. Otherwise, I would be riding a much more modest bicycle.

Your CR1 Team looks like an awesome machine. No doubt we will be learning from you as well. :thumbsup:
 

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I'm most looking forward to just getting back into shape. The debilitation that hurting my back caused really took it's toll on my waistline, hence the beefy wheels.. LOL.

I don't know about learning from me since I'm a newb when it comes to anything with drop bars. As hardcore of a biker as I have always been I've never "clipped" into a bike before, so I think it's safe to assume that lesson 1 will be to not fall on my face at stoplights. haha.
 

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FeydR said:
As hardcore of a biker as I have always been I've never "clipped" into a bike before, so I think it's safe to assume that lesson 1 will be to not fall on my face at stoplights. haha.
You'll be a past master in no time. You might practice on the grass a little first, if you like. At least with the SPD cleats/pedals that my wife and I use, the natural rotation of your knee outward as you try to put a foot down will automatically unlatch the cleat.

Starting with the pedal tension set low and with a little silicone spray on the pedals, even my wife can get out reliably. You will be fine! :D

Oh, and we like SPD cleats/pedals because we have several pairs of easy-to-walk-in, mountain biking shoes including sandals that accept SPD cleats. When the temperatures exceed 100 degrees here, sandals are a must . . . for me anyway. :cool:
 

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woodys737 said:
2008 54 R4.
Elegant! :thumbsup:

On of my friends here would much more approve of the understated markings on your 2008 Addict R4 than he does of the "glaring yellow lettering", in his words, on my 2009.
 

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TucsonMTB said:
Starting with the pedal tension set low and with a little silicone spray on the pedals, even my wife can get out reliably. You will be fine! :D

Oh, and we like SPD cleats/pedals because we have several pairs of easy-to-walk-in, mountain biking shoes including sandals that accept SPD cleats. When the temperatures exceed 100 degrees here, sandals are a must . . . for me anyway. :cool:
I did get some practice in while I was getting fitted for the bike... the platform they were using for the fit had SPD pedals on the cranks. I ended up going that route for the CR1 and got some SIDI shoes that will allow a decent amount of mobility off the bike. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
FeydR said:
I'm most looking forward to just getting back into shape. The debilitation that hurting my back caused really took it's toll on my waistline, hence the beefy wheels.. LOL.

I don't know about learning from me since I'm a newb when it comes to anything with drop bars. As hardcore of a biker as I have always been I've never "clipped" into a bike before, so I think it's safe to assume that lesson 1 will be to not fall on my face at stoplights. haha.
A beautiful bike and a good choice to start with a fitting. It should help with the initial transition. Keep us posted with how it feels on the road.
 
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