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OK - so intellectually I think I can process the "short tap" vs "long tap" shifting, but my question is whether it is difficult to get used to the idea?

Moving to a road bike from a Trek hybrid where I'm used to pushing two different levers to upshift or downshift.

How does the 105 work? I believe it's one direction for up, the other for down?

Thanks in advance for putting up with a noob question that's probably well hashed out before - Ray
 

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105=brake lever push to shift up the cog/chain ring, second lever behind the brake to shift down.
SRAM=short click on lever behind the brake lever (equivalent to the secondary lever throw) to shift down, longer (equivalent to the 105 brake lever throw) to shift up.

I switched from Shimano to SRAM a few years ago and it took less than 5 miles to get used to it
 

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I tried the SRAM double tap system when I was test riding bikes. Just like you, I was coming from a Trek hybrid (2010 7.2 FX). I can see how it would be easy to get used to, but I just didn't like it. I feel that the regular Shimano system is more natural. Also, with the double tap you might go down a gear instead of up a gear.
 

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it's actually very easy to get used to double tap

there is a very distinct "click" or "snap" when you push it far enough to shift, if you push it farther than that you get a shift (or shifts) in the other direction

the break point between shifting up and down is very distinct, and you're not going to accidentally shift the wrong direction unless you're really really not paying attention

one nice thing about sram, no accidentally breaking slightly when you're shifting (with 105, if you're downshifting on the cassette, it's pretty easy to brake a bit as you're swinging the brake lever over)
 

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I had an ultegra bike and rival bike for a while, rode them interchangeably depending on my mood. I never had any trouble figuring out how to shift or moving between bikes - it quickly becomes a non-issue for most.

Personally I preferred the SRAM shifting, but lots of people prefer Shimano. YMMV - the only way to be sure is to test ride bikes with each.

JB
 

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Keep in mind it's not just the shifting that's different. The hoods are completely different. I love that my Force shifters are adjustable as well, where my 105s are not (both the brake and shift lever are independently adjustable for reach).
 

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During my test rides for my first road bike in almost 20 years, I rode about 10 bikes. The majority of them were 105 equipped, but I rode a couple with Ultegra, and one with Rival. Maybe it was setup-related, or the fact that the Ultegra and Rival bikes were higher end, but I really preferred the way they felt to the 105 bikes. I ended up with Rival on my road bike, and I really, really enjoy the way it works. Double tap is no problem whatsoever.
 

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heffergm said:
Keep in mind it's not just the shifting that's different. The hoods are completely different. I love that my Force shifters are adjustable as well, where my 105s are not (both the brake and shift lever are independently adjustable for reach).

Good points. The adjustable levers are nice, but not really necessary for me. I prefer the Ultegra hoods, but it's a really close thing - there's nothing wrong for me with the way the SRAM hoods are shaped. If you have really small hands, I suspect the adjustable levers and smaller hoods will make SRAM a better choice.

JB
 

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jonathanb said:
Good points. The adjustable levers are nice, but not really necessary for me. I prefer the Ultegra hoods, but it's a really close thing - there's nothing wrong for me with the way the SRAM hoods are shaped. If you have really small hands, I suspect the adjustable levers and smaller hoods will make SRAM a better choice.

JB
Meh. I've got large hands (I'm pretty small in general but wear a L glove) and I still like the SRAM hoods tons better than the 105's. They're thicker, protrude less and because I tend to ride back a bit on the flats rather than fully in the hoods all the time, I love the adjustable levers... I can shift without moving my hands.
 

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deviousalex said:
Also, with the double tap you might go down a gear instead of up a gear.
With the shimano you might grab a hand full of brake and crash your bike.

If you do either of these, there's a good chance you probably shouldn't be riding.
 

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heffergm said:
Keep in mind it's not just the shifting that's different. The hoods are completely different. I love that my Force shifters are adjustable as well, where my 105s are not (both the brake and shift lever are independently adjustable for reach).
Did you ride the new 105's or the old ones? I know the new 105 the hoods are more ergonomic (i.e. more Sram like) and I think I read somewhere that they include shims to adjust the reach of the levers.

When I was testing ride bikes, I did try the new Ultegra vs the old 105 and hood shapes do made a difference. I found the more ergonomic shape of the Ultegra felt a lot better.

Eventually I ended up with Sram Rival because of the double tap and the fixed brake lever. Also, cost and weight when enter the equation, Rival lighter and cheaper than Ultegra. The only on complaint (and is a minor one) is the Sram drivetrains is be nosier then Shimano’s.
 

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BadWolf said:
Did you ride the new 105's or the old ones? I know the new 105 the hoods are more ergonomic (i.e. more Sram like) and I think I read somewhere that they include shims to adjust the reach of the levers.

When I was testing ride bikes, I did try the new Ultegra vs the old 105 and hood shapes do made a difference. I found the more ergonomic shape of the Ultegra felt a lot better.

Eventually I ended up with Sram Rival because of the double tap and the fixed brake lever. Also, cost and weight when enter the equation, Rival lighter and cheaper than Ultegra. The only on complaint (and is a minor one) is the Sram drivetrains is be nosier then Shimano’s.
My 105 is a 2010 model. As for noise, my new Force is quiet, if not quieter than the 105.
 

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sa7nt said:
With the shimano you might grab a hand full of brake and crash your bike.

If you do either of these, there's a good chance you probably shouldn't be riding.
^This

But be warned, if you go sram you may never go back to anything else! :D
 

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I have bikes with both Shimano and Sram groups and don't really prefer one over the other by a big margin. Shifting either is easy to get used to and works well.

It's probably more difficult switching back and forth between the two shifting methods, than it would be to just ride one or the other consistently.

Sram shifts "crisply" or "snappier", while Shimano is probably "smoother" or "clickier", for lack of better descriptions.

Sram's road levers are considerably lighter than anything Shimano offers. Partly I think this is because by using one lever to effect both up and down shifts, they can be smaller with fewer parts. But Sram also uses a lot more carbon fiber parts... at least in their top three model lines. Shimano 105 lever set is claimed to weigh 490 grams. In comparison, Sram Apex claimed weight is 344 grams, Rival is 320, Force is 303 and Red is 280. I'm not a weight weenie who swaps out steel bolts for titanium to save half a gram... but any time you can drop close to 200 grams it's something to think about.

In proper adjustment and with a well lubricated chain, I don't find either to be noisier than the other, or quicker/more positively shifting. Some folks prefer to use a Shimano cassette and chain on their otherwise all-Sram bike. Me, I've got just the opposite on one bike... Ultegra 6600 except for Sram chainrings (1070), chain (1090R) and cassette (1070). Hey, what can I say? It runs quietly and shifts great!

I do think Shimano are a little more tolerant of mis-adjustment. Sram needs to be set up and dialed in a little more carefully. I notice this the most at the front derailleur where it can be tricky to get cable tension right on Sram. An easy solution is simply to add an in-line adjuster to the FD cable.

But hey, if you are used to a trigger and thumb shifting method, maybe you should be looking at Campy! :)
 
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