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Forever a Student
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

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I have Ultegra Di2 and I love it, the SRAM system seems very sound as well. The price is more than $1600, it was around $2800 from the US pricing I saw in an article.
 

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Forever a Student
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Discussion Starter #3
$1660 is the minimum upgrade cost. That's just the levers and mechs. A full group will indeed be about $3K. $1660 does not include anything additional, meaning no buttons or extra anything. Just front mech, rear mech, charger, levers and batteries.


The levers are quite a bit smaller. The ergonomics are much different. I think this will be a polarizing group. Some are going to love it and some just won't be able to deal with it's uniqueness.
 

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A wheelist
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Did I miss something here? Everything I've read says that Sram have re-thought the shifting using a clean slate - something that Campagnolo and Shimano didn't do.

I guess the shift levers only push inwards towards the center line of the bike. So why didn't they rig them so that a push to the left makes the chain move left and a push to the right makes the chain move right?

As far as I can figure out, the opposite actually happens. Why?

From the column "Sram e-Tap, shifting finally makes sense" -

SRAM's eTap: Shifting finally makes sense - VeloNews.com

- we get this contradiction -

"Press the right button for a harder gear, the left button for an easier gear".
 

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A wheelist
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One of the articles said they had been working on the idea for 5 years - and your post was in 2012. Probably they had already taken out the patent by then.
 

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Should have added a "tounge in cheek" emoji next to my "patent" comment. My point 3 years ago was - wireless was just the obvious next step in shifting, since everything else in the world was going wireless.
 

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Interested but, will wait for the B model and get reports from friends who have to have the latest and greatest. Main concern for me is battery issues. 2032's for the shifters and rechargeable's for the fd/rd just seems like a bit much for me as someone who likes to KISS.
 

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Yes, interesting. Will follow the development and refinement.

In the meantime, I'll stick with DA9000 mechanical.
 

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Did I miss something here? Everything I've read says that Sram have re-thought the shifting using a clean slate - something that Campagnolo and Shimano didn't do.

I guess the shift levers only push inwards towards the center line of the bike. So why didn't they rig them so that a push to the left makes the chain move left and a push to the right makes the chain move right?

As far as I can figure out, the opposite actually happens. Why?

From the column "Sram e-Tap, shifting finally makes sense" -

SRAM's eTap: Shifting finally makes sense - VeloNews.com

- we get this contradiction -

"Press the right button for a harder gear, the left button for an easier gear".
To shift the FD requires pushing both buttons. That rules out simultaneously shifting both derailleurs.
Also if riding on the top of the bars you can't reach down with just one hand to shift the FD.
 

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A wheelist
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Should have added a "tounge in cheek" emoji next to my "patent" comment. My point 3 years ago was - wireless was just the obvious next step in shifting, since everything else in the world was going wireless.
Yep I've done that too - "Huh why didn't *I* think of that and patent it!"
 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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I have never used anything wireless that works 100% of the time. I'd like to try it for sure, but I can't shake the suspicion that it won't shift right when I need it most.
 

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Forever a Student
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Discussion Starter #14
To shift the FD requires pushing both buttons. That rules out simultaneously shifting both derailleurs.
Also if riding on the top of the bars you can't reach down with just one hand to shift the FD.
This is the deal breaker.

I will shift the front and rear mech together no less than 10 times every single ride.

This groupset will not sell much at all where I live. The inability to shift front and rear at the same time is a straight deal breaker.

If the roads aren't super pitchy, not so much of a problem. But when they're constantly pitchy, this is a HUGE problem. Hyperglide shifting is what makes Shimano my favorite. It works flawlessly. One chainring and three gears in the back without missing even half a beat. Impossible on this system. You'd have to stop pedaling, shift the front, shift the back, then pedal again. No thanks, not going to work around here.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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15,321 Posts
Did I miss something here? Everything I've read says that Sram have re-thought the shifting using a clean slate - something that Campagnolo and Shimano didn't do.

I guess the shift levers only push inwards towards the center line of the bike. So why didn't they rig them so that a push to the left makes the chain move left and a push to the right makes the chain move right?

As far as I can figure out, the opposite actually happens. Why?

From the column "Sram e-Tap, shifting finally makes sense" -

SRAM's eTap: Shifting finally makes sense - VeloNews.com

- we get this contradiction -

"Press the right button for a harder gear, the left button for an easier gear".
How is that a contradiction? It's exactly how it works. I know some are complaining about not being able to simul-shift front and rear, something that I honestly have never done on purpose. Ever. And it's definitely not flat where I live/ride. I know some people love to do it, and they'll most likely not look at e-tap, but they're in the minority as far as I can tell. I've worked with and ridden this stuff and it works. Very easy to set up. Very easy to adjust. It will be very interesting to see how the riding public takes to it.
 

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Crank Addict
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I'm diehard DA9000 mechanical... and this group interests me. Its as if they've taken all of the things that I don't like about Di2 or EPS and addressed them. That being said, I won't be an early adopter, I'll wait for others to street test.

My questions are... Would this work with a Shimano Crankset? if not, why? Will this bring down the price of the other electronic group sets?
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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I'm diehard DA9000 mechanical... and this group interests me. Its as if they've taken all of the things that I don't like about Di2 or EPS and addressed them. That being said, I won't be an early adopter, I'll wait for others to street test.

My questions are... Would this work with a Shimano Crankset? if not, why? Will this bring down the price of the other electronic group sets?
Chainring spacing is so close across the board I can't see why it wouldn't work. They're all almost exactly the same at this point.
 

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Crank Addict
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Chainring spacing is so close across the board I can't see why it wouldn't work. They're all almost exactly the same at this point.
Yes, that's what I would imagine, just don't have any practical experience to base it on. A good friend of mine is running Shimano Di2 with a SRAM RED crankset (for less weight, I think) and he has no issues. I know that many of the factory Spec Specialized bikes run Di2 with Specialized cranks (which are supposedly very similar to SRAM) without issue.... but if it works in one direction, it doesn't mean it has to work in the other...

As a mechanical DA user, I'd need FD, RD, Levers, charger and brakes, I suppose...
 

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How is that a contradiction? It's exactly how it works. I know some are complaining about not being able to simul-shift front and rear, something that I honestly have never done on purpose. Ever. And it's definitely not flat where I live/ride. I know some people love to do it, and they'll most likely not look at e-tap, but they're in the minority as far as I can tell. I've worked with and ridden this stuff and it works. Very easy to set up. Very easy to adjust. It will be very interesting to see how the riding public takes to it.
I do it on purpose when I'm on the trainer after an interval and nearly died. However, it's not a deal killer by any means. I would quickly adj to hitting both levers to drop the FD and then the right a couple of times to go up a couple of cogs.

There seems to be some in road cycling where if they can't have that thing they do .01% of the time, the deals off. They don't think that this new fangled thing might take 2 steps to do something, but makes 3 other tasks significantly better.
 
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