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I am nearly 2 years on my Dura-ace mech, so for me to chnage to something, it will have to be a total upgrade, Di2, hydro discs (which ownt be too far away i guess)

I am runnign the BB7's and i agree that the TRP Hyrd look good, and will more than likely replace the BB7's in the near future and then i will wait until the inital teething issues for the Di2 Hydro to go away and upgrade the whole thing
 

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For me, the riding I do and the terrain in which I do it, there's not much reason to be an early adopter. For me, give them a few generations to solve some issues, work out the bugs, make the solution more integrated and elegant, and re-assess. Of course, by then the rim-centric technologies may well have found some advances, too...
 

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When road riding I've NEVER been in a position where I felt I needed more/better braking power than I have with standard Ultegra or similar brakes.

And if I'm ever in that position the my first question would be should I be on something other than a light aggressive road bike.

Personally I think they are a solution to a problem that doesn't exist on the road. I totally get it for other types of riding but for road bikes on pavement I'll pass on hydraulics.
 

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Personally ... I think it's great, but more than that I like that they designed a hydraulic rim brake as well so people have options with their road bikes.

If you live in a "Wetter" area ... you will quickly learn to appreciate disc brakes when the weather turns bad in the fall and winter. In the summer, there isn't a whole lot of difference though ... which is where options become important.

Hydraulic brakes are the future of cycling ... whether they be disc brakes or rim brakes and this is a great first step in that direction. I think there will be a flurry of advancements over the next 3-5 years, then things will level off. So if you can wait ..,. hold off a few years until things settle down, if not ... be an early adopter and enjoy the new toys :)
 

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While I have not noted anything lately from LZinn taking him off a position of road disk's not necessary, I agree with many above, it will come and it will be standard. I will move to all at about the time a new frame and set up is a birthday present...what...3 years or so?!

That said, riding here in Front Range, Golden, Boulder with some of the best twists and turns going downhill, including road gravel, freeze-thaw cracks and some anger placed tacks (yup...some crazies still think a tack in tire at 50mph is funny) as well as late or early season Montezuma or Mt Evans surprise snowfalls...I'm like Jay Strongbow's post eariler; I've never needed anything other than my DA 7900 clamper's (onto FC 404's with Zipp cork) at 173 Lbs.

Certainly, outside of the very, very interesting new hood grip positioning I felt recently on the new SRAM, I see NO value in hydro assisted rim brakes...ever...
 

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For me, the riding I do and the terrain in which I do it, there's not much reason to be an early adopter. For me, give them a few generations to solve some issues, work out the bugs, make the solution more integrated and elegant, and re-assess. Of course, by then the rim-centric technologies may well have found some advances, too...
+1 ...

You know they say never say never but I do not see how a rim can be improved. It works for most of us except for the unfortunate few, so I cannot see a drive to improve something that has worked sufficiently well. Costs taken into account.
 

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When road riding I've NEVER been in a position where I felt I needed more/better braking power than I have with standard Ultegra or similar brakes.

And if I'm ever in that position the my first question would be should I be on something other than a light aggressive road bike.

Personally I think they are a solution to a problem that doesn't exist on the road. I totally get it for other types of riding but for road bikes on pavement I'll pass on hydraulics.
I agree that most caliper brakes have the power to lock both wheels. However, hydros offer must less effort to engage, like one finger. This can reduce hand fatigue on long decents. The "feel" or modulation of the brake is much better.

Hydro discs have their issues for sure, but I'd say they are an improvement to braking, not really solving a problem.
 

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I can see disc brakes leading to advancements in rim aerodynamics. The heat, dimensions, and forces generated by rim brakes have been a limiting factor until now.
I agree that this could be interesting to say the least. I don't have carbon clinchers because I love my long decents around here. I don't want to worry about my tires blowing off.
 

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I get the comments on the story and some of the comments here. Some have been riding 30 years and never seen this blow out problem. Some suggest riders in over their heads. Like Don, I also do much riding in the mountains and I have never seen the problem either. Doesn't mean it doesn't happen. How long have carbon clinchers been popular? And the more popular they become I am guessing we may hear more of the problem? I know there are video's on steephill. Certainly Levi's Gran Fondo made an issue out of tires/rims failing last year with their warning against using carbon clinchers. That resulted in multipage coverage by the mag's.

Will carbon clinchers be safer if using hydro disc's? I have no clue and don't plan on switching anytime soon. I do think the demand for carbon clincher's is rising and my perception is there are those that believe the best way to make them safer is going disk. Is this hype or sales speak? Again I have no clue.
 

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I'm all for this improvement to braking.

Unfortuneatly, you have to buy the whole group it appears. Oh, and you need a new frame too. That pretty much means new bike.

There will also be someone with the "great idea" (eye roll) to use a stupid lite rotor with the wrong pads to save weight. Then, on that decent, his/her brakes overheat and boil the fluid. Luckily, hydros recover from that quickly. I'm sure we will see a post ranting how crappy hydros are...................... Nevermind it was "user error"
 

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I LOVE hydraulics on my mountain bike and would never go back.

Hydraulic discs might make sense on a road bike, but might be outweighed by aero concerns. Time will tell.

Hydraulic discs on cyclocross will probably take off like crazy.... if only cyclocross ever takes off! ;-)

Hydraulic rim calipers? That's harder to guess. I imagine the feel really will be improved, so road bikes may go that way, at least at the Red/Force end of the SRAM-equipped bikes. How many people here know that there was a very brief phase of hydraulic rim brakes in the MTB world? But what they lacked was performance in the rain and mud, and I think that is a bigger issue for a MTB than a road bike.

What I really like is that SRAM actually came through with a hydraulic system that weighs less than their cable-actuated brakes. That is impressive.

At a minimum, the new "bull horns" on the SRAM bikes are going to become a highly visible status symbol.
 

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Not really sure how much this pertains to this thread, but i have a MTB with disk brakes which I use for the road. the other day while climbing a hill, I boke a spoke and the broken end wedged in between the disk and the pad locking up the wheel. almost catastorphic. with conventional brakes this will never happen. not sure if this has even happened to any one ever. just a thought.
 

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Hydraulic Road Discs: A solution to a problem that I don't have.
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Not really sure how much this pertains to this thread, but i have a MTB with disk brakes which I use for the road. the other day while climbing a hill, I boke a spoke and the broken end wedged in between the disk and the pad locking up the wheel. almost catastorphic. with conventional brakes this will never happen. not sure if this has even happened to any one ever. just a thought.
Sometimes crap happens...

Last year on a group ride we were doing some sprint training when a pedal got caught in the front wheel of a rider, it took out a couple of spokes and his wheel went really out of true ... it warped so bad it got stuck in the front brake, which locked up and threw him over the bars breaking his collar bone.

That wouldn't have happened if he was using disc brakes.

In another incident ... When I belonged to a former club, during one of the group rides a stick was kicked up by one of the bikes ... it ended up going through the spokes of the front wheel of another rider, locked up on the fork, threw the rider over the bars and he died shortly thereafter.

Crap happens and it doesn't take disc brakes to make it happen ... just a thought.
 

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I think that unless the UCI makes drastic changes to their own wheel safety rules disc brakes will only become the norm for those commuters and riders who for some reason are unable to brake with standard caliper brakes.
Disc rotors and mass start road events where people are racing in very close proximity to each other at relatively high speeds is a disaster waiting to happen.
Hydraulic rim calipers I simply cannot see the point in at all. Hydraulic rim brakes have been out for years and outside of trials have never caught on.
 
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