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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
One of the bikes that I am considering buying is a Salsa Casseroll Single. I Plan to use my new bike for everything from daily riding for fitness, maybe a event ride (50 miles or so) and commuting to work twice a week. The commute, which I now do on a Specialized Crosstrail, is about 13 miles each way on flat rural roads with a wide shoulder.
Would I be better off to buy a touring bike with gears like a Kona Sutra, or would the SS make sense for this.
I know I don't want to get a lightweight racing bike. My back isn't great and I don't want aggressive geometry.
Thanks for your help.
I don't know a lot about single speed., but I am intrigued.
 

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duh...
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do you shift a lot w/ that spec, or is it often windy? might want the gears if so... but a casseroll can be turned into geared if you want, it has der hanger. 1x9/10/whatever might be an option for you
 

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Militant commuter
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I commute on SS and fixed-gear bikes...in addition to geared bikes. For the conditions you describe, an SS makes sense from a simplicity standpoint, and you'll get a good workout if the wind is blowing.

Like FTF mentioned, a Casseroll can be easily converted to a geared machine if you decide you need to start hauling lots of cargo or want more versatility. IMO, the Casseroll frame is one of the best off-the-shelf choices to base a commuter bike around!
 

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Still waiting......
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I commute 35 miles each way over rolling terrain on a Casseroll. The only time it's sucked is when the wind gets cranking.

I like the SS as a commuter as cleaning and maintenance are very simple.

This is my first SS bike, and I got the salsa because it can be converted to a geared bike very easily, but that's not going to happen.
 

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SilverStar said:
I commute on SS and fixed-gear bikes........
All fixed gear are single speed but not all single speed are fixed gear. Right?

I think some wheels have a fixed gear on one side and a single speed (on a freewheel) for the opposite side. So you can flip flop the hub.

I'd think the freewheel would be great when you had a tailwind and some downhill. :D
 

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I commute on a fixed gear, and find it's no harder than when I used to do it on a geared bike.
I even take a hillier route home to avoid afternoon traffic.
 

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I do all my commuting on a single speed. My commute is a little shorter at about 8 miles each way, but it has a couple of climbs each way that keep it interesting, and I do it five days a week. As long as the hills and/or wind aren't too bad on your commute, I think single speed makes for the ideal commuting machine. Simple, low maintenance, relatively cheap. Go for it.
 

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lonesomesteve said:
I do all my commuting on a single speed. My commute is a little shorter at about 8 miles each way, but it has a couple of climbs each way that keep it interesting, and I do it five days a week. As long as the hills and/or wind aren't too bad on your commute, I think single speed makes for the ideal commuting machine. Simple, low maintenance, relatively cheap. Go for it.
I concur. My commute is even shorter and dead flat. I occasionally ride the fixie or my geared bikes if I want to do some maintenance. But my dedicated SS commuter is the weapon of choice.:thumbsup:
 

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Militant commuter
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Not all...

Not all fixed-gears are singlespeed...particularly if you run a "Dingle" cog or one of the Sturmey-Archer 2/3-speed fixed hubs (converted AW or stock ASC)...

That's clouding the issue, though -- for flattish commutes, nothing beats an SS for simplicity!
 

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Caseroll

I built up a Salsa for exactly this purpose and am very pleased. Good ride for an inexpensive frameset, and I love the look of the straight blade fork. I ride it fixed with 48/16 gearing, although I do have a freewheel on the back I have never used it - my commute is around 14 miles each way - with a couple of easy hills depending on the route. Moderate hills are actually easier on a fixed rig - of course results will vary.

I run 28 tires with fenders, do not think anything much larger will fit with the fenders in place.
I also use the rig for the ocassional sloppy winter weekend ride.
 

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I have a Casseroll SS and commute and Burley haul in flattish Denver. I have done several 50 mile days with the bike, including hills. My lower back is jacked up and I have no issues on this frame, I think it is a great bike.
 

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I'm commuting on a SS to work each day, about 20 miles RT, with some hills, and I love it. At first I truly missed the gears, but I appreciated the effort, and after a few weeks it is fun.
 
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