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Hi, I'm looking at a powermeter.
I have two bikes and was looking at the powertap P1 as they are easy to change from bike to bike.
However, for the price of the P1, I could get two stages powermeters for each bike.
The question is, which one(s) to go to.

On stages I see two problems.

1) it only measures on leg - is this such of an issue? Not sure what do to if I found one legs generates 52% and the other 48%.

2)reand on 2015 forums lots of problems with water, lack of conectivity, bad data, batteries runing out took quickly – have these been solved?

On the P1

1) it adds much more weight

2) Is much more expensive.

What is your view?

Thank you
 

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I own several PowerTap hubs. They've been pretty set and forget but I have had to have bearings replaced on two over the years. The Saris/PT people/customer service were great in dealing with those. I do change wheels from bike to bike. The PT wheel dish allows for 10 or 11 speed use and maybe? for Shimano or Campy use too. That's worked out well for me because I have older ten speed groups on bikes and newer 11 speed bikes. The ten speeds are all slowly being retired as cool new stuff is released so this is looking less important.

I'm looking forward to Shimano's new power meter. I expect it'll replace all the PT hubs as I replace groups and frames in the next few years.

If I hadn't already owned the PTs , I might have gone with a Stages at some point.
 

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".... if I found one legs generates 51% and the other 48%."
In that case you would want to check for the engine which generates only 1% of the total power.
 

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With the Stages, if that's the only power standard you're training with, you're fine. A Stages can vary from other power meters, depending on many variables not the least of which is L/R imbalances. It also can not be a linear difference, where you can just add 20W or something to your indicated power and have a rough guess. But if Stages is your sole system, it works about as well as any of them.

I have 5 power meters on various bikes. 2 SRMs and 3 Quarqs. They generally read very closely in various ranges in a semi-controlled environment (trainer). I used to have a Stages, and it did not track with the Quarqs at all. Most of this was due to my own L/R leg imbalance.

I used to have a Powertap as well, but found losing power when I wasn't using that particular wheel (training or racing) to be an issue for me. I wanted the data. My Powertap was on a heavy, high spoke count (32), training wheel. Durable as hell, but not a race wheel by any stretch of the imagination.

When I only had one Quarq, I swapped it from bike to bike. When I had two, I swapped them less often. Now I only swap power meters when I build up or tear down bikes.

A Stages is easy to swap from bike to bike, especially if the pedals match. No matter which wheels you use, you have power. The company has made great strides since the product was first introduced, so it can be considered a fairly mature product. Do I consider them as precise as my Quarqs and SRMs? Nope, but they work well enough for the vast majority of riders out there that will actually use them as intended.

Lots of options out there, so check out DC Rainmakers reviews and do your own research as well. The market has exploded in the last few years.
 

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I have a Stages PM. No issues with water, battery life etc.

Has the Stages PM tracked my power accordingly for mountains, flats, group rides, etc? Yes.

Have I successfully used my Stages PM to do workout plans and track progress? Yes.

Would I buy another Stages PM? Yes.

Would I recommend a Stages PM to a friend? Yes.

Is my left leg stronger than my right or vice-versa? I don' know. Some will say that if precision is important a Stages is a poor choice. Some will say that Stages is merely a guesstimate, and that my/yours true wattage potential will be either understated or overstated. Maybe this last part is important if you want to bring out the FTP measuring stick while at the local watering hole.
 

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If you want portability with a low price, check out the P1S pedals, which only records in the left pedal and is much cheaper. I just picked these up with a 20% discount. Works great so far, I'm not all that crazy in training that I need to measure both legs individually.

I would have gotten a stages if they made one for Specialized Carbon cranks. About the only crank they don't make a unit for. I was also looking at power2max, but I didn't want to lose it if I got a new bike and it was a few hundred more that I didn't want to spend.
 

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Agree with AlaskaMike. If Stages will be your only pm, then it probably is ok. However if you ever utilize any other type meter, the comparison between results can be significantly different, messing up training zones. I used a Stages for 2 years with no issues. But it was my only pm and I used it for both out door rides and trainer workouts. When I bought a Kickr trainer, things got problematic. Stages and Kickr were significantly different. Turned out I have some variability in leg strength. I switched to Powertap C1. It is extremely close to the Kickr reading.

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
 

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I have a pair of Powertap 1's for sale. They have less that 200 miles on them. I got them about a year ago and then tore my Achilles tendon a month after that. I am just now back on the bike but I am having to use Speedplays for the extra float. PM me and I can give you my phone number and we can text out a deal.

Powertap 1 - RoadBikeREVIEW.Com
 

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Neither - Check out BePro Favero. Pedal based. I've had the single side one for a few months now and really like it. 500 euros for the single side. Fairly easy to switch between bikes.

IMO single versus dual side meter isn't that important as you need reproducibility of data rather than <2-3% accuracy, unless of course you're using different meters amongst multiple bikes.
 

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How about getting the Powertap C1 chainrings for both bikes? They don't cost too much more than the Stages.
 

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Hi, I'm looking at a powermeter.
I have two bikes and was looking at the powertap P1 as they are easy to change from bike to bike.
However, for the price of the P1, I could get two stages powermeters for each bike.
The question is, which one(s) to go to.

On stages I see two problems.

1) it only measures on leg - is this such of an issue? Not sure what do to if I found one legs generates 52% and the other 48%.

2)reand on 2015 forums lots of problems with water, lack of conectivity, bad data, batteries runing out took quickly – have these been solved?

On the P1

1) it adds much more weight

2) Is much more expensive.

What is your view?

Thank you
Those issues with Stages existed mainly in their growing pain years, where consumers were beta testers. Today, with their new housing and battery door, none of those issues exist anymore. On the accuracy side, Stages is right there with the rest of the other players, because in this increasingly competitive market, if you're off too much more than your competitors, nobody is going to buy your product. On the data reproduce-ability, Stages are also right there with all the other players.

There are a few things that Stages (and all one-sided pm's) tend not to do well are:

- tend to respond slower with the first few seconds due to their one-sided nature; it takes a few revolutions for the Stages to start recording. This is not desirable for track racers since the first few seconds of power production is pretty important data for these folks.

- if you do a lot of constant quick surges in successions, then again, the Stages will be slow to respond due to its one-side nature. So your data will be very stochastic during these quick successive surges

- if you have an extreme right/left leg strength issues, then any one-side pm will not be able to show you the fidelity of a dual sided one. However, keep in mind that most normal people will have some leg strength discrepancy, and there isn't much training that they can do to solve it, the human body is not a perfectly 50/50 symmetry like we want. I think some experts on here such as Rchung has said that power delivery for most people tend to get 'unequal' when we're doing effort way below threshold or way above threshold. For threshold and sub-threshold power zones, power delivery is very equal sided for most people. So if you're normal, then there is no reason to think that you're legs are not generating just about equal power at sub- and threshold, which is what matters most for road endurance cycling

In general, for a person without some sort of right/left leg strength issue, who is looking to train more for the steady-state power delivery, then you don't need much data fidelity. What you need data reliability and reproduce ability, and you need equipment to last, and Stages have gotten this down, probably more so than any one-side power meter at this point.
 

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IMHO - In the current power meter market, Stages is costs too much for what it is.

Stages Ultegra: $580.

Quarq DZero alloy: crank based power meter (measures both legs) = $779. One can find 10% off of this price and may be able to find 20% off now.

Power2max Type S FSA Gossamer: $610 (measures both legs)

May be easier to switch cranks from one bike to another than switching pedals from one bike to another.

I think stages is no longer a good option for the $. If stages cost less ($250-$350), the trade-offs may be acceptable. But for $30 more dollars ($610 vs $580), you don't need to accept the trade-off.
 

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I have a Stages PM. No issues with water, battery life etc.

Has the Stages PM tracked my power accordingly for mountains, flats, group rides, etc? Yes.

Have I successfully used my Stages PM to do workout plans and track progress? Yes.

Would I buy another Stages PM? Yes.

Would I recommend a Stages PM to a friend? Yes.

Is my left leg stronger than my right or vice-versa? I don' know. Some will say that if precision is important a Stages is a poor choice. Some will say that Stages is merely a guesstimate, and that my/yours true wattage potential will be either understated or overstated. Maybe this last part is important if you want to bring out the FTP measuring stick while at the local watering hole.
me too. I like how it is easily swapped between my bikes too, keeping the cranks all shimano. It is very precise, highly respected power meter, and decent price with bluetooth (and ant+). It just doesn't measure the right leg.

if I didn't have Stages I would likely get a 4iiii which is about $400 installed on your crank arm Power Meters ? 4iiii Innovations

My wife has the garmin pedals power meter. they are pieces of shyt. horrible detestable frustrating power meter! But typical of Garmin unreliability (eg their head units! ugh) .
 

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I think some experts on here such as Rchung has said that power delivery for most people tend to get 'unequal' when we're doing effort way below threshold or way above threshold. For threshold and sub-threshold power zones, power delivery is very equal sided for most people. So if you're normal, then there is no reason to think that you're legs are not generating just about equal power at sub- and threshold, which is what matters most for road endurance cycling
Close, but not exactly. What you've written is too strong. What I've said is that for many people power tends to be *more* equal, not that it *is* equal near threshold. Whether that's good enough depends on the rider.

People have different strengths and weaknesses, just like power meters. Because they have different strengths and weaknesses, they'll have different needs from a power meter. Some of the things people do demand high quality data, some don't (you've mentioned sprint training as one example, but there are others). Many people just want to work on their FTP. That's not a very demanding application so almost any power meter currently on the market will satisfy that need. If you need to do something specific you'll probably find that not every power meter on the market is equally good at satisfying your particular need. I have pretty specific needs but I try never to assume that my needs are what everyone else needs to do.
 
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