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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at a used bike with a frame who by measurement provided from the seller, has a stand over height that is an inch higher than what I have for my existing bikes. The top tube bar will indeed hit "the boys," if not push them into my stomach region.

With that said, all other measurements for the frame are fine - top tube length is the same as my other bikes, as is the seat tube.

So the question is, except when standing at a traffic signal, how important is stand over height, or a lack of it - to riding the bike overall?

Thanks for the help.
 

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dd74 said:
I'm looking at a used bike with a frame who by measurement provided from the seller, has a stand over height that is an inch higher than what I have for my existing bikes. The top tube bar will indeed hit "the boys," if not push them into my stomach region.

With that said, all other measurements for the frame are fine - top tube length is the same as my other bikes, as is the seat tube.

So the question is, except when standing at a traffic signal, how important is stand over height, or a lack of it - to riding the bike overall?

Thanks for the help.


even when you're at a traffic signal, do you remove both feet from the pedals and stand there flatfooted? imo, standover is perhaps the least important geo consideration for a road bike
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
FatTireFred said:
even when you're at a traffic signal, do you remove both feet from the pedals and stand there flatfooted? imo, standover is perhaps the least important geo consideration for a road bike
Yes, least important is my feeling as well. And no, very rarely do I stand flatfooted on the pavement. In fact, I hate to disconnect from the cleats, so I find a lamppost or street signal to lean on (sometimes a car) if I can't track stand where I am.
 

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As long as the top tube height isn't dangerous ); I don't think it is that important. When I stop at a light I keep my right foot clipped in and touch my left toe to the pavement while leaning the bike a little. This way the top tube could be higher than what some would consider "comfortable".
 

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Standing over the bike doesn't make it "go". It's the fit on the bike that counts. If the reach and saddle to bar drop is what you want (given proper saddle height and position adjustment) I would think your good to "go". That said, if the "boys" become too familiar with the top tube, you'll be taking a 5 min. break. But hey, we all need a break from time to time anyway.
 

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For me, standover height is as safety thing. I want at least an inch between the top tube and my crotch when I'm standing over the frame with both feet on the ground.

If you plan your stops, you can use a telephone pole, fence, etc., or just plant one foot on the ground. In an unplanned emergency, though, that inch clearance could make the difference between just an adrenaline rush and serious injury. My $.02.
 

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my current racing bike which I bought off of ebay fits me great except the standover just brushes the boys when I'm in cleats and bibs. it has not been an issue at all.
 

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I think it's just an indicator (at least with level top tubes). Reach and fore/aft positioning are the keys. Odds are that if you can't straddle the bike, the reach is going to be too long and therefore the bike too large.
 

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That's the point

rcnute said:
I think it's just an indicator (at least with level top tubes). Reach and fore/aft positioning are the keys. Odds are that if you can't straddle the bike, the reach is going to be too long and therefore the bike too large.
+1 It would be a very unusual situation for somebody to fit well on a bike that was too tall for them to stand over. Either the bike has a very short top tube relative to seat tube length, or the rider is quite short in the legs and long in the torso. The usual way to deal with the latter problem is proper choice of seat tube angle and stem length,
 

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Scooper said:
For me, standover height is as safety thing. I want at least an inch between the top tube and my crotch when I'm standing over the frame with both feet on the ground.

If you plan your stops, you can use a telephone pole, fence, etc., or just plant one foot on the ground. In an unplanned emergency, though, that inch clearance could make the difference between just an adrenaline rush and serious injury. My $.02.
Eh, I'm taking these words to faith for the times I almost fell, it could make the difference.
 

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dd74 said:
I'm looking at a used bike with a frame who by measurement provided from the seller, has a stand over height that is an inch higher than what I have for my existing bikes. The top tube bar will indeed hit "the boys," if not push them into my stomach region.

With that said, all other measurements for the frame are fine - top tube length is the same as my other bikes, as is the seat tube.

So the question is, except when standing at a traffic signal, how important is stand over height, or a lack of it - to riding the bike overall?

Thanks for the help.
If the frame seat tube is the same as your current bike the extra height is coming from a higher B B or steeper seat tube angle or both. Nether of these may be what you want. Check it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks - interestingly, my other bike is a Colnago Super. I can't see how the seat tube would be any steeper and the BB any higher than on that bike. For all intent and purposes, the Super seems to be a crit bike.
 
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